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Radford (Radford)
Junior Member
Username: Radford

Post Number: 11
Registered: 04-2009
Posted on Friday, May 22, 2009 - 12:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

braymer.a feather is a term for. means roughly you have had the chance to do something and learn from it but do it right.then your name is on it.the valleys have two types which look nearly the same over here swept and laced.mr. wilson said the stone slate/tile whatever was 100 year old plus.i have for two days been in yorkshire home as well as other places to stone roofs.l have some pages from a book that l will try to get to you via photo album they are our roofing history.you must read them!its where we come from. photo oak peg substitute
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Braymer (Braymer)
Senior Member
Username: Braymer

Post Number: 109
Registered: 09-2008
Posted on Wednesday, May 20, 2009 - 02:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yes- embedding them keeps them in place, but when a routine repair is in order, it turns into a complete replacement since they are all stuck together. That guy here does brilliant work, you should see the photos on his website (click on his username and follow links to his company website) There are not as many closed/swept valleys like that over here.

Eyam church is a great looking building. 1665 now that is some history! the Dutch didnt start coming up this way (Albany, NY) until around 1680 and we didnt see any slate roofs around here until after 1800.
Thanks Radford- I will follow more of your clues when I have time later.
and What is a good feather?
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Radford (Radford)
New member
Username: Radford

Post Number: 10
Registered: 04-2009
Posted on Tuesday, May 19, 2009 - 04:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

braymer.you are right mr wilsons is a real nice place to look around.he has the total history of roofing.some roofs like kelham hall will hang for over the 100year mark.i shall find out more for you on this.you know slate has a shelf life.the hole in the stone is for a oak peg.now we use a aluminium one that drops in behind the lath.batten.or as you say strap.i am learning!these stone roofs really do go for the century marks.i have only done one.the history of it was the last man to die of the bubonic or black death plague.look up eyam in derbyshire.a good feather that was.and i will say a diamond cutter was used. and at first and second course three of us lifted the stone into place.i think if you look up colleyweston roofs you may see the connection over there that alot of this sides ways of roofing have been used in your country or visa.colley is a roof from local stone on a smaller scale and is lime cement bedded this makes a roof that lasts.i have only a token of this work but it may come round.photos i can get but not mine.the connection to your side is the bedded slate on the forum. fair play to the slater.he used local materials or at hand and both sides of the pond brains.and close for now the clever dog has a brilliant story.ps. the crates contain stone ridges from china 14 pounds a foot they are spot on in every way.mr wilson had to have these imported.tony
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Braymer (Braymer)
Senior Member
Username: Braymer

Post Number: 108
Registered: 09-2008
Posted on Tuesday, May 19, 2009 - 09:22 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Radford -
I am envious of Mr Wilson at Bakewell. What a nice stock of old roofing he has..
How old are some of those slates would you guess?
That last photo in particular has the slates with the center hole for lath Pegs..
All I have is a huge pile of 100 year sea green and some purple, your tradition goes back so many more hundreds of years.
You also have a dog in some of those shots. I like that, my dog is too stupid to be up on the roof with me..
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Radford (Radford)
New member
Username: Radford

Post Number: 9
Registered: 04-2009
Posted on Friday, May 15, 2009 - 03:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

reclaim yard in uk.stone slate.handmade.etc photo picasa.
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Braymer (Braymer)
Senior Member
Username: Braymer

Post Number: 97
Registered: 09-2008
Posted on Thursday, April 30, 2009 - 08:53 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks, excellent flashing details in that brochure, . !. I looked for those stilleto hammers, but only found framing hammers -none for slating. They look nice - expensive but nice. Thanks again. E
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Radford (Radford)
New member
Username: Radford

Post Number: 7
Registered: 04-2009
Posted on Wednesday, April 29, 2009 - 04:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

braymer.stage set slate cutting. www.caldergroup.co.uk/media/calderGTLW.pdf will give you the best uk specs of all leadwork.will post slate details later as we use.photo is chinese slate.the green one is in a small dispute as per quarry!
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Radford (Radford)
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Username: Radford

Post Number: 6
Registered: 04-2009
Posted on Saturday, April 25, 2009 - 05:41 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

will do braymer.been bit busy this week seems like over here is shutting down.one of the best tools l have ever used is a stilleto ti15 titanium. use for a week you will throw away your estwing.which is the most widely used over here l only had this hammer 2 month it really is a leep forward.the ti14 may be ok to own choice.hammer is used for stripping.battening etc
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Braymer (Braymer)
Senior Member
Username: Braymer

Post Number: 95
Registered: 09-2008
Posted on Monday, April 20, 2009 - 03:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Tony, those are some great photos. Do you have any close-up photos of slate work (like those 1/2 inch slates), flashing details, or some of the tools you use?
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Radford (Radford)
New member
Username: Radford

Post Number: 5
Registered: 04-2009
Posted on Thursday, April 16, 2009 - 01:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

darley dale ex private school photo shows stripping.defra had to be there all the time to protect bats.took photo up a chimney stack.credit to others also on this roof.old school type newark and sherwood district council nottingham.slate man that is correct site.l am well pleased you over there taught me. to do it computing is hard for me!
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Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 122
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Thursday, April 16, 2009 - 11:33 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Wow Tony, very nice!
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Slate_man (Slate_man)
Senior Member
Username: Slate_man

Post Number: 397
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Thursday, April 16, 2009 - 06:32 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

http://picasaweb.google.com/radford.tony
This is what I found.
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Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 121
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Wednesday, April 15, 2009 - 08:34 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

What am I missing here?
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Kwhord (Kwhord)
Senior Member
Username: Kwhord

Post Number: 204
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Wednesday, April 15, 2009 - 07:12 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

What language is that?
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Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 120
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Tuesday, April 14, 2009 - 08:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

radford. Is there a site to go and look at the picture? Where on Picasa?
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Radford (Radford)
New member
Username: Radford

Post Number: 4
Registered: 04-2009
Posted on Tuesday, April 14, 2009 - 04:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

old school.slateman. kelham hall.tower to the left hardly in picture.done before main roof by another company and a good hand.90% of main building by us.new westmoorland random deminishing.inner wells with reclaimed.on picassa for public all.to view.this building has stock history and is well worth looking on the net.my uncle sadly not here was ordained here to be a vicar.many years ago.is the practice of using batten applied your side of pond.ps. whilst the main roof of kelham hall is ours please note the other areas have others names on them and l would like them to have the credit.next photo soon.
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Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 115
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Thursday, April 09, 2009 - 09:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We will look forward to your posts
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Radford (Radford)
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Username: Radford

Post Number: 3
Registered: 04-2009
Posted on Thursday, April 09, 2009 - 04:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

old school. braymer.info you gave spot on.thankyou.l am now waiting for picasa to download.and l intend to give an accompanying description with photo.these will only be those which l think are interesting.the rest could be boring.slateman.we are not so lucky with web sites as you are they are more to product info.ican say this the rules of roofing are the same for us and you.the good bit l think is the materials used and how they are used.l cannot wait to exchange info. its coming slowly.mr. jenkins we also adopt this your method.and when knife is at hand strike with the holer on the on reverse. holes.break and dress the slate.l do often take a slate at any length and take it from a 10 to 6 inch width and valley cut from head to tail 50% of slate raking.l think its which way suits us best.and how much we do it.the young ones kick up on somecuts but by the end of the job they love it
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Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 114
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Wednesday, April 08, 2009 - 07:34 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You see, I spelled Picasa with 2 s's
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Braymer (Braymer)
Senior Member
Username: Braymer

Post Number: 93
Registered: 09-2008
Posted on Wednesday, April 08, 2009 - 08:45 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

There are many free web sites that offer hosting of your photos, you load them up there and then just paste the link to that location here in the message board. Here is a good one - http://picasa.google.com/
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Slate_man (Slate_man)
Senior Member
Username: Slate_man

Post Number: 396
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Wednesday, April 08, 2009 - 05:26 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Radford do you have a web-site or any other site from over there with good info or pictures.
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Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 112
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Tuesday, April 07, 2009 - 09:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am in the same boat. I have set up an account on Picassa, but I haven't had the time to post any pictures on it yet. I guess I can post the pics and label them and then direct you guys to the site; instead of trying to post them on here. That is the thought anyway. I will try it soon.
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Radford (Radford)
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Username: Radford

Post Number: 2
Registered: 04-2009
Posted on Tuesday, April 07, 2009 - 02:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

thankyou a nice welcome.old school.braymer.of course l have photos l am trying to work out how to send them the size 5.24mb gave error of to bigger file.l shall get round it though.my intentions however is to provide you with as you asked for braymer an insight to roofing over here.and work l have done.advice would help.on file sending on this forum.
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Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 111
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Monday, April 06, 2009 - 08:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hey Radford, welcome to our world on this side of the pond. Good to have you.
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Braymer (Braymer)
Senior Member
Username: Braymer

Post Number: 91
Registered: 09-2008
Posted on Monday, April 06, 2009 - 04:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thank You Sir,
Some call that weather clipping here in the States, the bottom corner is trimmed off diagonally along the rake edge slates to minimize wind lift. Do you have any photos of your work in the UK? It would be good to see some photos of slate work from over there..
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Radford (Radford)
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Username: Radford

Post Number: 1
Registered: 04-2009
Posted on Monday, April 06, 2009 - 03:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

who ever.
a slate has dressed edges.and in most projects that l work on here in uk it is the normal practice to use a slate knife and anvil.please try to use these tools they give the slate a natural look.roofs are created in slate.l use at times slate over 1/2 thick welsh.burlington.and many more these are mostly heritage works.but the same applies to all my other projects.the benefit will be yours. a diamond cut is ok on the right application.try this on a slate roof verge.cut a corner off the slate by 2"sq a racking cut up the verge.this will allow rain to track down to the eaves and into the guttering.giving more protection to the verge.the cut on the slate is here called. a winchester cut.your aim to ask instead of anything may do is a possitive way to achieve a good result
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Stephen J Taran Jr.
Posted on Wednesday, December 01, 2004 - 05:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

In the slate quarries there has been a new type of slate trimmer made and used for the last 8 ears or so. it has a skill saw like blade that trims the slate and puts that rough edge on it. I am going to have the man that makes these machines make some thinner blades to go on to a skill saw for cutting valley slate,half slates ect. The whole reason for the new machines was to cut back on waste and broken slate. Being on both ends the quarry end and the roofing I feel this is a good idea and if it works maybe even a smaller blade for a battery operated saw. I WOULD LIKE SOME SLATE ROOFERS INPUT AND COMMENTS FIRST.
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admin
Posted on Friday, December 03, 2004 - 10:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Might be good for thicker slates, provided it leaves a beveled edge.
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Stephen Taran jr
Posted on Saturday, December 04, 2004 - 09:56 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

yes it will leave a beveled edge. that is what got me thinking about doing this, we did a restoration job on a heavy slate roof and all the vallys were cut with a diamond saw blade and left smooth edges. This blade will be the same type the quarrys use.
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admin
Posted on Sunday, December 05, 2004 - 05:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

A slate hammer and stake will cut valley slates on heavy slate roofs and also leave a beveled edge. A lot of roofing contractors don't know this or don't want to bother with this, so they use a diamond saw, which looks quite bad.
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slateworks
Posted on Sunday, December 05, 2004 - 07:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi, For heavy slate cutting,On the last roof I used a diamond blade in a 4.5" hand grinder,cut the slate 1/4" to 1/2"long than used a hammer & stake(trim slate on back side) to trim to the line,worked good..Worked with a roofer from Scotland this summer and he had a Slate knife worked good for cutting heavier slates,I would like to purchase one if someone has one available?..If I remember right is there a face cut valley called a Queen Ann's cut(Guillotine)? I have used this cut with a slate cutter on some valleys when using salvaged 1/4" slate,gives a slightly different look,but for the heavier slates the beveled edge is the way to go.I would like to see how the saw blade cuts,I would use one if it leaves a beveled edge.
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Stephen J Taran
Posted on Sunday, December 05, 2004 - 09:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Let me ask this How can you cut a nice straight line for a vally slate thick or thin slate with a hammer and stake?? This blade will leave the trimmed edge on the slate just like it came from the quarry.
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tmccdon
Posted on Sunday, December 05, 2004 - 10:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

i use a slate cutter on thin slates,slate stake on thicker slates,yes,it can be slow and tedious,however it makes nice bevel and most certainly can be made straight,on some projects architects have specified that all slate be cut using stake,joe probably covered technique in bible,mainly it takes practise,the blade is an interesting idea and would be useful if it works,i have not seen or heard of a knife for this purpose,maybe peter crawley will know,the only time we have cut slate on face and kept bevel edge down was when installing closed valleys, this leaves a nice sharp straight line on valley
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Peter
Posted on Monday, December 06, 2004 - 04:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi tmccdon,

I have a knife (somewhere) it is like a long hatchet with the handle offset to suit either the left or right handed slater.

Stanley still make them, I know because I had to buy one not too long ago when a knife belonging to a slater working for me went AWOL.

I prefer the hand cutter because there's less waste, the guillotine is a good tool but can be difficult with heavy slate.

We cut the slates from the back leaving the bevel as nice as the day the slate was quarried.

If you find yourself in a really tough spot and can't leave to look for tools a piece of angle iron and a hatchet will get you out trouble.

Just mark the back of the slate and with a good eye and confident strike you will cut the slate, the only problem is a lot of waste.

You have to start taking small sections from the waste side and work your way into the the line, the slate must be held on the iron within about one inch of each cut or it will shatter.

Do you guys ever find it's easier to do these things than to try and explain the process by writing it down ? :).

Regards,

Peter Crawley,

www.crawleyroofing.com
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Monday, December 06, 2004 - 06:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have a slate knife I picked up in England in a hardware store. Never use it because i use a cutter most of the time and a hammer and stake (or other straight edge) if the slate is thick. What Peter says is important - you work your way into the cut line by knocking away the excess slate with the hammer first rather than just trying to cut along the line through the middle of a piece of slate with a hammer and stake (which won't work). Slatework's method is also a good one - and we tend to use this method as well - cut the excess off with a diamond blade, then trim the edge with a slate hammer to produce the bevel.
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slateworks
Posted on Monday, December 06, 2004 - 07:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Peter,Yes chunks of slate were flying everywhere when he was showing me how to use the slate knife and stake a slate cutter is much neater.When I use the power grinder to trim slate it creates to much dust,I wear a dust mask for this job,and saftey glasses. Only use it when slate seem to be very hard and thick. Answer to your last ? Yes- Just ask Joe how long it took him to bring it all together. Take Care, Ron

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