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Lucerne96 (Lucerne96)
New member
Username: Lucerne96

Post Number: 9
Registered: 03-2011
Posted on Saturday, March 12, 2011 - 07:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The truth is that many American buildings aren't worth slate roofs as they aren't worth saving.
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Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 66
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Friday, February 27, 2009 - 10:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

OPn the other hand, they are lucky that they are still alive. Wow!
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Braymer (Braymer)
Senior Member
Username: Braymer

Post Number: 86
Registered: 09-2008
Posted on Friday, February 27, 2009 - 09:09 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yes its good to see the old timer shots, the nerve they had standing on those planks with nothing behind them..
It is refreshing to look over a town and see almost all natural roofs. There are still some small towns in the Northeast US like that (the ones close to the quarries or the trailines and waterways leading from them), but they are dwindling.
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Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 65
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Thursday, February 26, 2009 - 10:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

A lot of those pictures were from many years ago. I looked at some of the recent pictures and they are just as safety minded as we are now. A lot of mechanical lifts and such.
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Kwhord (Kwhord)
Senior Member
Username: Kwhord

Post Number: 173
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Thursday, February 26, 2009 - 09:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The thing I like most about those church shots from Europe is looking off into the town and seeing nothing but real buildings with real roofs too. They are not just reserved for mansions and important buildings.
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Braymer (Braymer)
Senior Member
Username: Braymer

Post Number: 85
Registered: 09-2008
Posted on Thursday, February 26, 2009 - 04:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Here is a post from 2006 titled
"Pics of slate roofs and towers i builded am from belgium my age 33"
http://users.telenet.be/NATUURLEIEN/

A nice group of many photos from atop churches and real big Jobs in Europe. I also saw what old school meant by using flashing between courses of nearly upside down slate applications on steeples/ turrets to keep them tight.
These guys also dont look tied into anything up on those wooden ladders on scaffolds. No OSHA in Belgium?. Good stuff.
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Old_school (Old_school)
Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 29
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Monday, January 19, 2009 - 08:57 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am glad it is helpful. There is no sense in re-inventing the wheel every time another slater starts working on a roof. I figured it out by myself, but I am sure that many others did the same thing years back.

We did a slate restoration on a building here in Kalamazoo, back about 17 years ago. The roof was originally installed in 1878, so it was about 114 years old at the time. When we took it apart, it was obvious what the original installers were thinking as they did their work. I hope that someday, in the distant future, someone says the same thing about my work.

We are not just working for people today, but for generations to come. Remember that!
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Braymer (Braymer)
Senior Member
Username: Braymer

Post Number: 55
Registered: 09-2008
Posted on Monday, January 19, 2009 - 08:37 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Mr Crookston, I will look for those posts/pictures. Great T.R. article by the way, good reference for rounded roofs.
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Old_school (Old_school)
Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 28
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Thursday, January 15, 2009 - 10:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The guy from Belguim posted a ton of pictures of how they did that roof. They are nailed and there is a lead sheet flashing lapped over the top of each course as it is applied. Those were pretty stout slates too, and the nails were into the rough sawn decking. I am sure that the lead acted as a "washer" to tie them all together as well as a flashing. You can't argue with their precision as far as the cutting at the corners is concerned. I am sure that they lay the slates out to get a good length at the corners and then adjust to the middle.
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Braymer (Braymer)
Senior Member
Username: Braymer

Post Number: 53
Registered: 09-2008
Posted on Thursday, January 15, 2009 - 12:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

OK. When nailing slates that are hanging almost upside down (at a negative slope on the bottom of a curved under steeple for instance), how are these nailed so the slate will not eventually come loose from gravity? I know 3 nails are usually used on a scalloped german pattern with side and head laps.
Is there a special nailing pattern for almost upside down applications to keep these tight?

Also, any hints on layouts for when courses get close to the hip/ ridge (corners) slates in old German Style applications?
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Eric Braymer
Advanced Member
Username: Braymer

Post Number: 47
Registered: 09-2008
Posted on Wednesday, December 31, 2008 - 03:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

In the back of the new Traditional Roofing Mag. , there was a guy from Germany you wrote to Joe J. offering photos and discussion on German/European slating methods and concepts. He suggested starting a discussion here on the message board soooooooooo......
I hope this guy sees this and offers his insights and photographs. (no name ws printed)
It is hard to find sources (books) for European patterns and methods. These would be great to see.

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