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Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 274
Registered: 07-2006


Posted on Monday, April 28, 2008 - 10:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Coincidentally, I got the magazine in the mail today. The article was pretty well written, I thought, although the "mistakes" listed by the other roofers were a bit off base. One mistake listed was a lack of drip edge, however, the lack of a drip edge is standard for slate roofs. In other words, 99.9% of the time, metal drip edges are completely unnecessary on slate roofs. If you examine traditional slate roof systems, the ones that have lasted a century or more and are still going strong, you will find that they do not have metal drip edges.

Metal drip edges were invented to keep asphalt shingles from sagging over the edge of a roof. Traditional slate roofs do not require metal drip edges and very rarely had them. When they did have them, they were mostly for use as decorative trim. I write about this in Traditional Roofing (http://www.traditionalroofing.com/TR6_drip_edges.html).

This does not mean that metal drip edges are bad for slate roofs. They don't really hurt anything, and when a cant is formed into the drip edge, thereby eliminating the need for a wooden cant, they can be useful. But the lack of a drip edge is not a mistake at all, and anyone who thinks a metal drip edge is necessary on a standard slate roof would be the wrong person to be asking for slate roofing advice.

We actually sell copper drip edges with the cant built in to them for those contractors who want a drip edge. They can be seen at http://josephjenkins.com/store/product.php?productid=16198&cat=274&page=1
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David Spradlin
Member
Username: David_spradlin

Post Number: 27
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Monday, April 28, 2008 - 09:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I didn't think so. But 11 pages over they do a fairly indepth (comparitavely) "Q&A" article with representatives from EcoStar and DaVinci, both synthetic slate manufacturers. Frustrating but typical for these types of trade magazines. All this in an issue about "Green Roofing". Only one short, unresearched article on slate. The reason I asked about the HPDE interlayment is that they give a list of your top four mistakes when installing slate roofs, then they give a list of other "slaters" top mistakes, and one of them is "When using HDPE (high density polyethylene) interlayment, run lengths no longer than 10 feet to 15 feet and over-lap 1 foot to avoid buckling.". When I hear "interlay" anything, I think of shakes. And if they're interviewing "slaters" for a trade magazine article, that lay slate roofs like shakes, then theres something very wrong.
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Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 273
Registered: 07-2006


Posted on Monday, April 28, 2008 - 12:01 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I was *not* interviewed for the article, but I'm glad to hear they gave traditionalroofing.com a plug. I have not seen the article. There is *lots* of misinformation floating around out there about slate roofing, and a dearth of information about traditional methodologies.

I have no idea what HDPE underlayment is. Any time a roofer is emphasizing underlayment with slate roofs, their understanding of slate roof systems is questionable, in my humble opinion. I have worked on well over a thousand slate roofs and probably 95% of them had no functional underlayment (because they were so old). The lack of functional underlayment is typical with slate roof systems as the slate outlasts the underlayment by many decades. The underlayment is totally unnecessary for the proper functioning of a slate roof.

Most of the slate roofs that I have worked on that had functional underlayment were new ones I installed myself with 30 lb felt. When we installed the slate, we put hundreds if not thousands of puncture holes in the underlayment when we installed the slate. No water gets past the slate anyway if the roof is correctly installed, so the underlayment is obsolete once the slate and flashings are installed.

.
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David Spradlin
Member
Username: David_spradlin

Post Number: 25
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Saturday, April 26, 2008 - 12:35 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Joe, Did Michael Russo interview you for the "Slate: No rocket science required" article in the April issue of RSI? It seemed like he just skimmed through the SRB. They constantly promote all these new-fangled systems and hardly give traditional applications a passing knod. While they promote synthetics in almost every issue. Articles which are always full of misinformation about natural slate. They did give traditionalroofing.com a plug, but that magazine rubs me the wrong way. By the way, what is HDPE (high density polyethylene) interlayment?

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