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Walter Musson
Advanced Member
Username: Walter_musson

Post Number: 45
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Monday, March 10, 2008 - 09:41 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Kurtis,
Yes they do- a terne coated copper with no lead called Freedom Gray. Available in both 16 oz. and 20 oz.
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Kurtis Hord
Intermediate Member
Username: Kwhord

Post Number: 34
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Monday, March 10, 2008 - 08:44 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Revere makes a product similar to lead coated copper but without the environmental issues associated with lead.
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Slate Affair Inc.
Senior Member
Username: Slate_man

Post Number: 180
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Monday, March 10, 2008 - 06:20 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Here is a another link to the same site. http://www.copper.org/applications/architecture/faqs.html
About how lead coated copper dosn't exstend the life of copper. FAQ #21
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Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 229
Registered: 07-2006


Posted on Friday, February 29, 2008 - 07:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We did a restoration job on two college buildings side by side about the same age (1930s), one with regular copper and one with lead coated. They both had holes in the same places to the same degree, as if the lead had no real preservative effect. I have come to the conclusion that the lead provides more of a look or appearance than anything else. It eliminates the copper look altogether, which is what some architects want. We would rather not use lead coated copper because of the lead oxide leaching into the environment. We do use it once in a while, however.
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Slate Affair Inc.
Senior Member
Username: Slate_man

Post Number: 176
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Friday, February 29, 2008 - 05:55 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Well the main reason we us it is for masonary flashing. I have been told that different masonary element will eat up copper quicker then lead-coated copper. So lead coated is great for through flashing details. The other reason I would us it is becauce you can paint which I have done. I have replaced woodend object on hictorical roofs with lead coated replacments that are then painted to match. If you where to paint copper you will need to prime it first with a clear coat(The product slips my mind at the moment.) Also the lead coating protects the copper longer taking it longer to brack down the copper under it.
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Ward Hamilton
New member
Username: Olde_mohawk_masonry__historic_restoration

Post Number: 6
Registered: 04-2007


Posted on Thursday, February 28, 2008 - 09:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Can anyone substantiate the value of lead coating on copper? I always 'assumed' that the copper benefited from an added, protective layer (a la painted tin.) I read recently that the lead offers no added protection but, rather, was developed for different reasons:

"Lead-coated copper was developed and gained widespread use between the turn of the century and World War I. Its development was spurred by two principal desires: to provide a metal for roofing and flashing with the appearance and corrosion resistance of lead at a lower cost and with significantly less dead weight; and to provide a roofing and flashing material whose runoff stains would be compatible with white painted woodwork and light colored masonry, particularly the more porous materials including marble, limestone, mortar and concrete. Lead-coated copper fulfills the first objective and very nearly satisfies the second. The stains produced range from light to dark gray in color and resemble the natural atmospheric weathering of the masonry or paint." [http://www.copper.org/applications/architecture/finishes.html#top]

I also read once (but, darned if I'll ever remember where) that copper was coated with lead to disguise the material and deter theft.
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Jamison Lee
New member
Username: Jlee

Post Number: 2
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Sunday, February 24, 2008 - 10:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

the slope is 3 or 4 in 12.
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Slate Affair Inc.
Senior Member
Username: Slate_man

Post Number: 172
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Friday, February 22, 2008 - 04:37 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You could also go with lead coated copper. This can be soldered and the painted too.
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Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 223
Registered: 07-2006


Posted on Thursday, February 21, 2008 - 09:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

What's the slope? If the slope is too low, you should use soldered seams. You can paint copper and stainless.
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Jamison Lee
New member
Username: Jlee

Post Number: 1
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Thursday, February 21, 2008 - 06:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm restoring a 1923 house that had a slate roof and flat "tin" roof on the porches (painted red). I'm assuming it was terne steel. I've been trying to get quotes and info on replacing the now asphalt shingle coated roofs with something close to the original. The home is on the national register. When I say a flat roof, most people try to sell copper soldered-seam, however i'm not really interested the look of copper for this particular project. I suppose it could be painted, but I want red! A couple of salesman have told me to go with standing seam because it doesn't have to be painted every 5 years like flat metal. Doesn't the TCSII have a finish coat that doesn't have to be painted that often? How does it compare in price to copper - if the end goal is to have the red color? I suppopse i'd be willing to go with standing seam if the seams have a low profile. I'm told there is a cheaper kind of standing seam that snaps together and has exposed fasteners vs. panels that are crimped. Any words of wisdom on this? When I get a quote from a roofer, they tend to not give as much detail as I want - so i'm just trying to educate myself and know what i'm buying.

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