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Charles Caron
New member
Username: Messenger91

Post Number: 6
Registered: 10-2007
Posted on Saturday, August 16, 2008 - 07:24 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sorry, the word should have been “compliment”. Dam word check..

Joe, sorry for not getting back and setting this straight.
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Charles Caron
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Username: Messenger91

Post Number: 5
Registered: 10-2007
Posted on Tuesday, June 03, 2008 - 06:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Joe,
Thanks, thats a complaint. Sure I'll send what I have.

Curtis,
I have had worked construction and done roofing before. I will say I thought those guy knew slate that I use to work for. Now I agree with Joe. Neanderthals! Skills and knowledge that should have been passed on didn’t and it shows. I suggest get his book read it, think about, reread it again and you should have digested enough to tackle a slate project. If not, you will know who not to hire.

As for my projects, I personal wanted to know more because I purchased a gambrel shingle victorian with massive slate roofs. Beautiful, unfortunately the pervious roofer used to do repair were to say the least Neanderthals.

I like doing the job right the first time.
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Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 282
Registered: 07-2006


Posted on Thursday, May 08, 2008 - 11:51 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Looks good Charles. Can you send me a before and after photo that's high resolution? I can maybe put it in the next Traditional Roofing Mag. Email to joe at josephjenkins.com.
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Kurtis Hord
Advanced Member
Username: Kwhord

Post Number: 46
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Thursday, May 01, 2008 - 09:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Nice Job! Charles are you a roofing contractor, or was this a DIY project on your own house?
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Charles Caron
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Username: Messenger91

Post Number: 4
Registered: 10-2007
Posted on Thursday, May 01, 2008 - 07:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

First, Thank You,Joe.
Thanks for the advice. I found three layers of valley under this one. Including the one that showed it being a closed valley at one time. Along with all the slate from the pitch change all tarred down. I tried to save as many as possible but they just kept breaking. So I ended up replacing the whole straight roof with new slate. Any way, it made it through the winter completely dry. It looks a lot better. except the slate color. I tried to fix that by harvisting some from the back but there are a different shade and the copper residue that washed down. If any one has any I belive them to be munson black please let me know. I will go back and replace these.
Well, again Thanks Joe
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Charles Caron
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Username: Messenger91

Post Number: 3
Registered: 10-2007
Posted on Monday, October 29, 2007 - 03:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Joe,
I was planning on bring the 12P slate down to the 8P. I also will do as you suggested with the 16x16 flashing. I did find it in the second addition. The info that i got was from copper.org(http://www.copper.org/applications/architecture/arch_dhb/flashings_copings/valle ys.html) I actually have both and was looking in the first before you mentioned that. Are there any good trade tricks to get the slate properly angled beside use an adjustable angle tool and a measuring tape? (faster method) Should I close up the 8P first, tight into the valley the run the 12 over? or just butt them to each other?
Sorry for so many questions. I just want to do this right the first time.
Thank you very much.
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Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 189
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Friday, October 26, 2007 - 01:34 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Charles - the size of your step flashing is limited by the size of your slate. The flashing can only be so big before you start puncturing it when applying the overlying slates. I have never heard of a 9" under each side step flashing on an 8" slate. You may want to consider using square step flashings installed as in a closed valley as shown in the Slate Roof Bible, 2nd edition. They are installed with the corners pointing up and down in the valley. I'm on the road right now and don't have an SRB in front of me to give you a page number (it should be in the valley chapter). When we install step flashing in closed valleys, we typically use 16" square, 20 ounce copper. You will probably have to bring the mansard side of the slate down to the valley center too, which means removing the slate from that side and replacing it as well.
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Charles Caron
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Username: Messenger91

Post Number: 2
Registered: 10-2007
Posted on Wednesday, October 24, 2007 - 12:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

First, Joe, Thank you for your input.

Following your advice I'm going to close the lower valley. I found that all the slates were tarred in at the tops and under from the just about the pitch change to the bottom of the 8 pitch. The slate is 14x8" (I plan to change them to 16x8" to get 3.5HL) with only 1.5 head lap curtainly. Would you suggest going out further out on the 8 pitch with the step flashing. The standard is called out at 9" under each side of the roof(slate) material for pitches over a 6 pitch. CDA standard. Should I be going with a 17x24 flash leaving 15" on the 8 pitch? My concern is snow/ ice daming it is northern facing. Picture were taken at 12pmish.
I realize that closing the lower valley in should solve this. Just looking for clarifiaction.

Thank you
-Newbie
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Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 187
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Tuesday, October 23, 2007 - 01:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

For repair, I would consider using a "W" valley on both sections. The lower section should be separate from the upper section and you will probably have to solder an extension on the top of the lower section that will extend underneath the upper section. Then run the upper section out over the lower one a couple inches.

If I had to do this from the start, such as when originally installing the roof, I'd consider running the slates on the lower section right up against the mansard and step flashing there (no valley), then having the upper valley extend out over the lower part of the roof a few inches so the only open flashing would be the upper valley (with a 6" exposure).
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Charles Caron
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Username: Messenger91

Post Number: 1
Registered: 10-2007
Posted on Monday, October 22, 2007 - 12:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I need to repair a roof at a valley and replace the valley at the same time.
Here's the problem: one roof is about an 8 pitch and the other is gambreled (8 then roughly 16). valley is about 16" open. At the top no problem it's where the steep slope of the gambrel meets and turns. The water runs down the 8 pitch then dumps down the 16, runs accross the valley right under the 8 pitch roof slate. Too make matters worse theres an eye brow window that directs water back to the turn.
I found that the roof from the turn is all tarred in. Broken shigle replacement in this area was done by a "tar-a-holic".

The orginal valley has a "v" crimp at the edge(trying to catch if water went under)and was set in the traditional rounde valley form.
I was thinking of using a "w" valley that is offset to the 8 pitch side to prevent this from happening giving it the normal round middle appearance.
Any suggestions?
I really don't want to tar them back in.Valleyvalley 2

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