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Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 266
Registered: 07-2006


Posted on Friday, April 11, 2008 - 06:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You can now see soldering iron demonstration videos at our online store. There are also videos of other tools (cutters, hammer and stake). The list of videos is here: http://josephjenkins.com/store/pages.php?pageid=2
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Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 253
Registered: 07-2006


Posted on Monday, March 31, 2008 - 08:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The bar is touched to the tip and removed according to the amount of solder needed to flow. The 550 watt iron would probably be your best bet.
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AF
Junior Member
Username: Tonyeriepa

Post Number: 17
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Monday, March 31, 2008 - 01:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Joe ... I plan on doing it in summer when temps should be over 75. So you think the AB wouldn't have a problem heating up, for example, the joint where a flattened seam joins another flattened seam at right angles which can be as much as 6 layers thick for single-lock?
I'll bet the 550W would be better than the 300W?
Re temps, AB as you know gives you up to 1010F whereas I think the average plumbers torch gives you a 3500F flame temp ... much bigger risk for rosin paper ignition!
Looking at the most recent Traditional Roofing copper articles, and drawing a blank on my recollection of the June07 Field Conference: should the solder bar be touched to the soldering iron's tip in order to add more solder to the joint or instead dipped in the pool of solder close to/that trails the tip??
Thanks!
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Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 251
Registered: 07-2006


Posted on Sunday, March 30, 2008 - 08:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The electric irons work nicely out side. We're told they don't work so well in cold weather, but you can say that for most solder irons. We don't solder outside in cold weather, so we can't say from experience. We are using the electric irons a lot now, outside, and they're nice. We sell a lot of them. We have a deal going on through April 15th (2008) that anyone who purchases more than $200.00 worth of slate stuff on our store gets a free copy of the Slate Roof Bible. We just opened a new online store and this is a grand opening promotion.
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AF
Junior Member
Username: Tonyeriepa

Post Number: 16
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Saturday, March 29, 2008 - 02:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yes, the conduction-caused heating and potential smouldering/ignition has me worried .... I didn't have any rosin in my first mock-up which showed no wood scorching.
I might just have to get the Express or Sievert ... assuming of course that the temp they raise the copper to is less than an open flame would raise it to???
I gather that unless it's very warm out, the electric irons won't be able to get things hot enough.
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Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 247
Registered: 07-2006


Posted on Friday, March 28, 2008 - 07:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The flame doesn't have to contact the rosin paper to cause it to start smoldering underneath the metal. Heat conduction through the metal will be enough. Slate Affair is lucky - so far.
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Slate Affair Inc.
Senior Member
Username: Slate_man

Post Number: 214
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Friday, March 28, 2008 - 04:52 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Using wire solder (There is different size wire solder.) is fine to, we use that and 1/4x1/4 bar the most. The bigger bar like 1/4x1/2 are good for total flat.
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Slate Affair Inc.
Senior Member
Username: Slate_man

Post Number: 213
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Friday, March 28, 2008 - 04:49 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The propane torch may be a bigger flame them you need but i have installed roofs with the same torch it worked out fine. I do all most all soldering with a torch and have never started a fire.
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AF
Junior Member
Username: Tonyeriepa

Post Number: 15
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Thursday, March 27, 2008 - 09:33 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I want to do a small flat-lock-seam roof (low slope with a curve) over my back-door entryway using 14" or 18" 16oz roll copper. I plan to run the seams eave-parallel instead of using wall-to-eave (vertically oriented) standing seam.
Not having all the roof-soldering gear, but having copper pipe-sweating gear, I'm wondering what the downside is to using a standard plumbers kit and a "copper pipe sweating" approach to seal the joints: wire solder, flux paste, and a small propane torch! An advantage would be that by heating the uphill side of the 1" seam the most, a narrow bead of solder would be sucked into the seam which would make the soldering "strip" much narrower than normal and thus less visible and thus leaving a higher percentage of the copper roof as copper. That is, there would be less seaming visible.
Yes, there is the fire risk, but I was thinking that focusing the flame on the uphill edge of the horizontal joint might make it very hard for any flame to wrap around the joint to weasel its way down to the rosin paper substrate.
Any suggestions positive and negative would be welcome!
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Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 174
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Sunday, August 19, 2007 - 01:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"would 1 1/8" true X 6" or 8" tongue and groove atlantic white cedar be ok for the subroofing?"

That would make a great subroof.
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pieter prall
New member
Username: Pieter_prall

Post Number: 3
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Thursday, August 16, 2007 - 05:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Mr. Jenkins,

I just went to your store and looked a supplies and found answers to alot of my second set of questions.

Pieter Prall
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pieter prall
New member
Username: Pieter_prall

Post Number: 2
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Thursday, August 16, 2007 - 05:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Mr. Jenkins,

Thanks for the link to the workshop photos. I did not see them. The only photos I saw were from another workshop with a small sample section. Most of my questions have been answered by looking at the photos you just suggested.

What though is "ruby fluid"?

Does it have anything to do with the heated trough that I see being demonstrated for pre- tinning in one of the photos?

What should I be using for the subroofing?

The sequence mentions 1X12 rough hemlock. I was thinking about getting Atlantic White cedar to use for the soffits and trim: would 1 1/8" true X 6" or 8" tongue and groove atlantic white cedar be ok for the subroofing? Or should I use something else? I live in a deciduous woodland area and it's fairly shady and damp...55 inches a year here.

Thanks

Pieter Prall
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Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 172
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Thursday, August 16, 2007 - 03:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Pieter,

Have you looked at the photos of the SRCA conference where we did a flat-lock soldered copper workshop?

http://www.slateroofers.org/albums/Conferences/2007/index.htm
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pieter prall
New member
Username: Pieter_prall

Post Number: 1
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Wednesday, August 15, 2007 - 06:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I read the article on making flat-solder-seamed copper roof. It is basically quite informative; but taking it one step at a time; I need to ask folks of merit about the bending of the panels. 1: I cut the copper into rectangles, which in my case will be 18" X 24". 2: I cut each corner off at approximately a 45% angle to begin making the pan. 3: I bend two adjacent sides up 90% and the two opposing adjacent sides down 90%. OK!

My first two questions are:

(1): How wide should the bent (up or down) edge of the pan be? Should it be 3/4"; 1"; 1-1/4"; or some other measurement, all around the four sides of the pan?

(2) In practice would the width of the bent-edge of the pan vary from 16oz. to 20oz. copper?

This gets me to the point where I've made all of my roofing pans. My next question is about the tabs for attaching the pans to the roof:

(3)Are these tabs to be made of the same thickness material as the pans? How far apart should they be spaced on an 18" X 24" pan.

(4) What length and gauge nails should be used to tack down the tabs to the sub-roofing?

My next questions have to do with crimping, bending, and flattening the seams.

(5) What tools are used here?

(6) Just a good Mallet? Are crimping pliers needed? Any suggestions as to weight of hammer and width of crimping pliers? Is any other kind of flattening tool useful in flattening the seams?

Questions about soldering.

(7) Do you clean the metal edge to be soldered with any sort of solvent before fluxing the metal?

(8) Does one apply flux around the entire pan-edge to be soldiered? Does one pre-apply solder to the pan edges before fitting the tabs together and flattening them down to ensure that the joints are filled with solder?

(9) Or do you just let the heated solder flow into the seam?

Any suggestions will be appreciated. And my old farmhouse, which is surrounded by unappreciative suburban transplants, will be brought up a notch or two. I plan to start by experimenting on the decommissioned outhouse.

Thanks to all,

Pieter Prall

P.S. See my new bird guide-books on Amazon - The Easy Bird Guide - Eastern Region; and The Easy Bird Guide - Western Region; Globe Pequot Press.

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