Alternative to breaking out stucco to... Log Out | Topics | Search
Moderators | Register | Edit Profile

Slate Roof Central Message Board » Ice and Water Membrane, Plywood, and other Controversies » Alternative to breaking out stucco to replace a rusted flashing « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 1142
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Thursday, November 05, 2015 - 08:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

What you are dealing with there is a "Lack" of a kick-out flashing at the bottom of the roof. It allowed or even forced the water to run behind the stucco.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Brycenesbitt (Brycenesbitt)
Advanced Member
Username: Brycenesbitt

Post Number: 50
Registered: 08-2012
Posted on Thursday, November 05, 2015 - 12:56 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

And what 77 years of a flashing mistake can lead to:
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Brycenesbitt (Brycenesbitt)
Advanced Member
Username: Brycenesbitt

Post Number: 42
Registered: 08-2012
Posted on Thursday, October 22, 2015 - 03:59 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Update: at least 6 layers of past repairs removed (lead sheet, caulk, hot mop, tar, tar paper, bitchathane):



Note the wall top forms part part of the deck. The overhang is a separate piece of wood held up by fake rafter tails.

The old flashing is still needed as the "weep screed" for the stucco wall. A little 93% zinc "STOPS RUST Cold Galvanizing Compound Spray" will go on, for better or worse.


(Message edited by brycenesbitt on October 22, 2015)

(Message edited by brycenesbitt on October 22, 2015)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 1134
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Saturday, October 17, 2015 - 12:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Bryce, that is one reason I showed you the "stepped" counter-flashing, as you normally are not more than 12 to 14 inches long, and they will bend a bit to the wall. Depending on how the barrels of the tile lay against the wall, we also installed a secondary over flashing before we installed the termination counter-flashing, so that the water dumped into the "trough" of the tiles, about 5 inches away from the wall. The flashings have a 45 degree angle kick OUT from the wall, which you fill with caulk. This also takes up some of the unevenness in the stucco. We anchor the "J" flashing with nails at the outside lip which are just pressing down on the outside of the vertical leg so that they are just pressing down on the leg with the heads of the nails and not on the inside flat area. In your picture example, this nail would be between the vertical lines of the existing flashing and the new flashing as it were, and the nail head would be flush with the red line indicating the "new" flashing. It works well! You could either tear out the old flashing, or just beat it flat ind install the new system over the top. You can always call me if you like. It worked well for us and we have done many like that over the years. John Crookston
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Brycenesbitt (Brycenesbitt)
Intermediate Member
Username: Brycenesbitt

Post Number: 39
Registered: 08-2012
Posted on Saturday, October 17, 2015 - 12:34 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

For others reading this thread, here's a link to termination bar. It would surface mount to the stucco:
http://www.h-b.com/?main_page=product_info&products_id=48

Here's a picture of the existing flashing: as repaired by the school of "adding more layers of roofing, caulk, and sheets of lead always makes things better:

Note the nails through the flashing, which have of course pulled up.



In high resolution:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/10105026@N07/22236989352/in/dateposted-public/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/10105026@N07/22260265711/in/dateposted-public/

The new caulk ensures that the water dropped into the wall by the flashing can't dry.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Brycenesbitt (Brycenesbitt)
Intermediate Member
Username: Brycenesbitt

Post Number: 38
Registered: 08-2012
Posted on Thursday, October 15, 2015 - 12:19 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Interesting. The tradeoff with the termination bar would then be a series of holes in the stucco and whatever paper is left below.

This stucco is fairly undulating. Are there termination bars with a rubber edge that can deal with uneven surfaces?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 1132
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Wednesday, October 14, 2015 - 08:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Will it work? Yes. Is it the best and fastest way? No. You will have a hard time cutting into the stucco and you may cut through. I would just use a termination bar and fasten it. You are going to use caulk to seal it anyway and you can get more and better adhesion without cutting. I can forward you some pictures of how we did it on a large tile replacement job if you will email me. good luck!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Brycenesbitt (Brycenesbitt)
Intermediate Member
Username: Brycenesbitt

Post Number: 36
Registered: 08-2012
Posted on Tuesday, October 13, 2015 - 10:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have a 1938 home with a Spanish tile roof. The flashing at the stucco edges is galvanized steel, somewhat rusted and apparently original. The home is in a non-freezing zone.

The roof does not overtly leak, but there's evidence of past systemic moisture damage.





It's pretty clear this flashing just dumps water into the wall: there is no kickout. No amount of caulk will ever really fix this. I'll also bet the metal is more rusted behind the stucco than outside.

Bad kickout flashing on stucco

I'm loathe to hammer out the stucco and replace the flashing, thinking the paper below is already in poor condition, and the process could introduce additional problems. What about something like this, with a groove cut into the stucco, and the existing flashing left in place.



Is this done? Does it work out?

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Program Credits Administration