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Alan
Posted on Tuesday, April 26, 2005 - 05:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hello,

I am a homeowner and I am planning on replacing my current roof (asbestos) with a synthetic slate product (Lamarite). The roofer that I am working with has bid the project to have I/W shield installed on the entire roof. My current decking material appears to be butted 1x8's (house was built in 1941.

Should I be object to the install of the I/W shield, or recommend a different treatment?
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Anonymous
Posted on Tuesday, April 26, 2005 - 10:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

yes recommend 30# felt, maybe I/W on lower 3'. also why? synthetic slate? have you researched this? seems to me real slate is the best and is comparable in price to the synthetic slate. i mean you either want slate or you don't. seen LOTS of problems with fake slate. good luck
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alan
Posted on Tuesday, April 26, 2005 - 10:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Would like to have the genuine slate roof installed, but the cost is prohibitive. The synthetic slate is coming in at 1/2 to 2/3's the price of a slate roof. So - I compromise. Synthetic slate is better than asphalt/cedar/etc....

Can you explain why I don't want the I/W shield on the entire roof? He has quoted the install for I/W shield and 30# felt for the entire roof.

thanks
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TonyF, Erie PA
Posted on Wednesday, April 27, 2005 - 10:27 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Alan-
I was looking at getting the Canadian version (by Crowe; Authentic Roof 2000) but it would have cost almost $400/square delivered through a distributor. I ended up getting slate from VT for $250/square delivered, so I'm interested in knowing roughly what the per-square cost of the Tamko product is ... I've a smallish fill-in area to do that traps a lot of snow and abuts a low-slope roof so I'm concerned about damming and water sneaking up and under the slate under the wrong conditions (not that the Tamko synthetic would be free of that problem either).
Cheers,
Tony F
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alan
Posted on Wednesday, April 27, 2005 - 11:14 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Not sure of the exact cost of the product per square. My guess would be in the neighborhood of $275-$300.
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admin
Posted on Wednesday, April 27, 2005 - 12:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That price is comparable to natural slate bought direct from the quarry.

Joe
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Alan
Posted on Wednesday, April 27, 2005 - 12:34 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

True- but isn't the labor on a 'real' slate roof much more expensive?

All I know is that I have bids to replace my asbestos roof (18-20 SQ) with synthetic slate for 13k and it would cost 22k for a real slate application. I have received similar quotes from several roofers. At the end of the day I can't justify the extra 10K for the real slate.
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admin
Posted on Wednesday, April 27, 2005 - 12:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Regarding the IWS - here's the deal: we've been putting slate roofs on buildings for centuries. Slate requires no underlayment and many slate roofs - all barns for example - never had a square inch of underlayment. If an underlayment is to be used, the 30 lb felt underlayment has been proven to work fine. It will turn to dust eventually, but since slate roofs require no underlayment for proper functioning, it doesn't matter.

So the question is - if it ain't broke, why fix it? No one knows what the long term effects of seamless, self-stick, non breathing underlayment will be on slate roofs because it hasn't been used until recently. And why is it being used? Why would an expensive underlayment suddenly be necessary for a roof that has never required any underlayment in the first place, and never will? It's apparent to me that the IWS issue is one that has been promoted by asphalt shingle roofers, perhaps tile roofers, architects, roofers who are afraid their roof installation is going to leak, and others who don't understand how slate roofs work or don't know how to properly install them. Slate roofs have to be watertight for a century or two. The purpose of the underlayment is temporary. It is to keep the water out of the building until the slate is installed.

Put IWS all over your roof if you want to, but if you're putting natural slate over it, it's a waste of time and money and makes the roof surface slippery and therefore more dangerous to work on when installing the slate. Plus, it is not a "tried and proven" material on roofs that are expected to last a century or two - so use it at your own risk.

One problem with it is in repairing the roof in later years. Will the hardened, cracked, disintegrating IWS impede the use of a ripper under the slate 50 years later? I have already run into this problem. My ripper was getting hung up on some hardened, cracked, thick underlayment while trying to remove some step flashings that had been improperly installed. It was the self-adhering material - it had dried up and cracked under the heat of the slate and was creating a major pain in the butt when trying to properly repair the roof. The guy who had improperly installed the step flashings used the IWS underneath the flashings thinking it would stop the leaking that was sure to result from his poor workmanship. It didn't.

I find the almost religious fanaticism about IWS use on roofs to be extremely irritating and potentially disastrous for the slate roof restoration professionals of the future. We never use it and do not recommend it at any time on a steep slope slate roof.

We already know what works. Stick with it, or make known improvements, but don't go shooting in the dark with unnecessary, expensive materials because the company sales rep is laying on a smooth line of talk.

Joe Jenkins
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admin
Posted on Wednesday, April 27, 2005 - 12:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"At the end of the day I can't justify the extra 10K for the real slate."

There is an old saying: People who can't find the time or money to do something right the first time, always manage to find the time and money to do it over again.

But buyer beware... I have seen a number of new natural slate roofs improperly installed that are now in litigation. If the slate is installed properly, it's the best deal - hands down. But there are lots of roofers out there who don't really know what they're doing.

On the other hand, an architect emailed me photos of a fake slate roof that is ten years old - on an elaborate institution. The entire roof now already has to be replaced. But this time they're using natural slate. This is not uncommon.

Joe
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alan
Posted on Wednesday, April 27, 2005 - 02:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Joe- thanks for the feedback. Sure, in a perfect world I would go with slate. There is no doubt that it is a superior roofing product. That said, I don't have an extra 10K sitting around to dedicate to this project. Would you not agree that the Tamko Lamarite is a superior option to asphalt 30y shingles?
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slateworks
Posted on Wednesday, April 27, 2005 - 05:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It has not been on the Market or Exposed to the elements on a roof long enough to compare this products life expectancy to other proven Roofing materials,I do not know of any man made slate product that has lived up to it's so called Life expectancy__If you are trying to save $10,000 you should try to save some more money and Install a 40 or 50 year shingle- If you eliminate installing Ice & Water shield on the whole roof and do some negotiating you might be able to get a Slate roof for around $20,000 and as stated above as long as you are dealing with a good company having the real slate installed would be money well spent.
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Walter Musson
Posted on Thursday, April 28, 2005 - 05:55 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Alan,
The use of IWS over the whole roof is a bad idea because of concerns of having no breathability to your board deck.That would amount to putting a vapor barrier on the wrong side,it should be just under your ceiling surface.At $90 for just over two sq. it's also pricey.
If you live in a climate with ice damming problems then as someone suggested earlier use one course at the eaves to help with backup concerns.
As with any roof the quality of the mechanics doing the install plays a huge role in how that roof will perform.I'd check out your roofer further to judge his qualifications.His idea of doing your entire roof in IWS would send up a red flag if I were the customer.
It can't and shouldn't be expected to make up for a lack of quality in the install process.
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Walter Musson
Posted on Thursday, April 28, 2005 - 05:58 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Tony F
Have you considered using metal for your tie in.
Maybe standing seam or a locked panel application depending on it's complexity.
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Jim K in PA
Posted on Thursday, April 28, 2005 - 05:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Alan,

As another homeowner, I am going to toss my hat into the frey here. The synthetic slates should be installed in the same manner as natural slate. That is, nailed individually. The difference in method that most roofers use when installing the sythetic slate (limited to my own research) is they use their air powered stapler to install the plastic slate. You cannot do that with natural slate, and that results in much higher labor costs for the installation of natural slate due to increased skill and time requirements. Now, your synthetic slate will likely last quite a while, but will it last as long as the thin wire staples? Unlikely. In addition, the plastic slate will be attached too tightly to the roof deck due to the high pressure stapler, and will cup or deflect upward, creating a very unnatural appearance. The cupping and distortion will also compromise the function of the roof by allowing more wind blown moisture to get under the plastic. That is why you WILL NEED IWS under the plastic slates if the contractor installs them in that manner. I have personally looked at several plastic slate roofs that have shown the lifting of the lower edge. They were brand new and looked horrible (IMO).

The $10k "savings" is false economy. Honestly, if you cannot "do it right" by installing good quality natural slate in the proper way, you would be better off, IMO, waiting until you have the additional funds. If you must instal a roof right now, then install the cheapest asphalt roof you can find. The difference between what you would have spent on the plastic slate should be used to start a savings account into which you should contribute regularly over a 10-15 year period until you have enough to re-roof your house in natural slate.

This is just my perspective, limited to my own observations and not supported by many years of experience like Joe, Walter or Steve. I own a house that is nearly 200 years old with slate over most of it. I am re-roofing it all in slate myself this summer. If you are physically capable, you could do the same yourself with careful planning and some time invested in learning.

Best of luck with whatever choice you make.

Jim K in PA
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alan
Posted on Thursday, April 28, 2005 - 06:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thank you all for the feedback/input. From a purist perspective, I would agree that the long term merits of a natural slate roof are real. However, I have to be pratical given the following conditions:

-Roof needs to be replaced
-Asphalt replacement = ~10K
-Synthetic slate = 13-14K
-Natural slate = 22K

Given those options, my gut tells me that the synthetic slate is worth the extra 3-4K. Surely you would concede that the Tamko Lamarite (synthetic slate) is a superior roofing product when compared to 30yr asphalt, no? Again, I would love to have the natural slate roof, and I admire the craftsmanship associated with the install - but the juice isn't worth the squeeze.

I respect the need to protect your craft, but 'occasionally' one must be practical.
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Spencer P.
Posted on Thursday, April 28, 2005 - 08:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

In my opinion if you have to go thru all that trouble to I/W the whole roof for a fake product I would go with a high end 40-50yr. asphalt roof (they make some decent looking products "carriage house") and they (asphalt shingles) have more actual roofing time under their belt than this fake synthetic material. And they say even EPDM breaks down after 10yrs. and all you need is 3' max. of I/W along eves edge and you can 30# felt rest of roof. Why would anyone want a roof that the I/W (underlayment?) is their ACTUAL roof? Even in this day and age with all the knowledge available to homeowners about products you still have the silver (salesman) tongue devil. I've never seen a good fake slate roof--seen alot of them come off though, with still about 3/4 of the (um) warrenty left. And how can anyone call anything a superior roofing material that needs the underlayment to keep the water out? Just some questions. Spencer P.
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Jim K in PA
Posted on Friday, April 29, 2005 - 10:00 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Alan,

You said:
"Surely you would concede that the Tamko Lamarite (synthetic slate) is a superior roofing product when compared to 30yr asphalt, no?"

I would agree ONLY if the plastic slates were installed in a traditional manner, over your existing roof deck, and without the IWS. Copper nailed by hand, with copper valleys and copper ridge. That will certainly be superior to a cheap 20 or 30 year roof. However, if it is installed improperly, I am afraid the potential advantage that the plastic slate would have over 30 year asphalt stapled to the roof will evaporate if the plastic slates are stapled to the roof as well. Again, you are certainly in the best position to decide what is best for you, but I would inquire about the specific methods your contractor is going to use in the installation of the plastic slates. Compare these with the manufacturers recommendations, and how natural slate is installed.

Like I mentioned above, the difference between the plastic and natural slate is only in the materials, not the labor, if the proper methods of installation are followed. That is why I am cautioning you to be thorough in evaluating your options and the costs.

The terms "practical" and "purist" are subjective, so I will keep my definitions of those words to myself . . . ;~)

Keep us posted on what you decide and how it works out. I would love to see some pictures, too. Feel free to email me directly if you prefer.

Jim K in PA

P.S. - I am in no way trying to protect a trade, business or other economic interest, since I have none to protect! I have already obtained my salvaged Peach Bottom and VA Buckingham slates for my house and garage. Now I just need a few cases of copper nails, some copper sheet and time!

J.K.
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admin
Posted on Sunday, May 01, 2005 - 12:07 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Another option would be to install natural slate on your roof in sections over a period of a couple or a few years. We do this from time to time on residences when the cost of replacing the entire roof at once is prohibitive. We installed Spanish Franvisa slate on a house owned by an 85 year old lady several years back, for example. We installed it in 3 sections over three years. She has since died, but she left her house with a 100 year roof.

Joe Jenkins
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deanne niehaus
Posted on Monday, August 29, 2005 - 08:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dear Slate Roof Central Message Board,
This is a very interesting topic. We have a small chapel which is a replica of a chapel in Germany. Our chapel was built in 1976 with a slate roof. We had thought that there was hail damage to the roof because of missing slate, and places where the felt was showing through. We had two roofing companies look at the roof. Roofing Co. #1 estimated at 22K with IWS over the whole roof and would put on slate roof. (estimate April 2005)
Roofing Co. #2 estimated at 54K with IWS over the whole roof and put on slate roof with copper nails. (Estimate August 2005)

1. If I understand what's been said, this IWS would not be necessary on the whole roof. True?

2. We are in central Minnesota where there are not many slate roofs, so how do you know what to check on with a roofing company as to expertise in slate roof installation?

3. We were told by Roofing Company #2 that the plywood on the decking is not thick enough and needs to be removed and replaced with 3/4 inch plywood. It looks like to them that there is a "wave" in the slate rows because of the slate being too heavy. Also the orginal nails don't seem to be long enough because you couldn't see them sticking through from the inside of the roof.

Interested in some insight. It isn't like we need to replace the roof this minute (no leaking on the inside) but it seems in future it would need to be done? We have 3 chapels in Wisconsin that have never had roof work done on their slate roofs: being built in 1953, 1954, and 1964.

Thanks for your help! Deanne from MN
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admin
Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 - 12:08 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

1) If the roof has been constructed properly (adequate slope, etc.,) and if the slate is installed properly, IWS is not required at all. It was never used in the past on the millions of slate roofs installed in the U.S. and wasn't needed. There is no need for it now other than for the roofing industry to sell a product that is unnecessary, or for a roofing contractor to temporarily hide bad work.

2) That's a tough question. You probably don't have a lot of skilled slaters out there. Did you check the SRCA member list (http://www.slateroofers.org/members.htm)?

3) The roof decking should be at least 3/4" boards (not plywood) or 1" boards, even 1.5" boards. Why put a stone roof on a sub-standard wood deck? If you do it right, a new slate roof will last 150 years (much longer than IWS, and the decking needs to last at least as long). You can read more about slate roof installation mistakes at http://www.traditionalroofing.com/TR4_mistakes.html.

Joe Jenkins
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Anonymous
Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2005 - 10:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Deanne, I live in the Twin Cities metopolitan area and have visited with slate roof home owners as we are in the midst of installing a slate roof.

The info I have gathered so far: 1) Gerlock-French and Kaufmann Roofing are good places to start for Minnesota contractors. 2) This website has good, pertinent info, but can be limited at times. 3) Get a copy of the, "The Slate Roof Bible", and educate yourself. 4) Joe Jenkins is the man you want to contact regarding specifics - he's kind enough to give advice you can trust.

Hopefully this is somewhat helpful - good luck and I hope things turn out well for you.
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Deanne
Posted on Friday, September 02, 2005 - 11:47 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dear Anonymous,
Our chapel built in 1976 was roofed by Kaufmann Roofing in the Twin Cities. We have been in contact with them because of how our slate roof is right now. They didn't seem to offer much help. The slate we received from them is chalking on the southside and is also lifting at various places. I haven't checked the Gerlock-French company. Thanks for your insights.
Deanne
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Deanne N.
Posted on Sunday, September 04, 2005 - 11:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Back to the chapel problem:
1. How long a life does slate have if it is chalking? And why would it only chalk on the south side?

2. If slate has been broken along the bottom edge of the roof does that seem to imply ladders were leaning against the slate?

3. Along the edges - our chapel has an "umbrella back with 5 wedge segments. The small cut slate are starting to fall out and some felting is showing. The roof does not show leak marks inside. Is this to be a concern?

4. What would be some reasons for tile starting to lift?

Thanks. Your website here is wonderful. We were really helpless until we found this to bounce questions off. The whole website has been very useful.
Deanne
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Joe Jenkins (Admin)
Posted on Monday, September 05, 2005 - 01:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Are you sure you have a slate roof and not an asbestos tile roof or a fiber cement-shingle roof? If you have an actual slate roof, what kind of slate is it?

Joe Jenkins
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Deanne
Posted on Tuesday, September 06, 2005 - 04:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dear Joe,
We do have a slate roof. This is what the bid to our contractor says: "We would propose to install a 50# slaters felt over the entire roof and then install a cathedral gray. Copper step flashings and copper hip and ridge will also be installed. We will also install slate on the tower." I do not find documentation on what actually was installed. We contacted the company and their records only go back 25 years. It is definitely stone slate. All our chapels (180 around the world) have slate like the first one in Germany.
Deanne
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Joe Jenkins (Admin)
Posted on Thursday, September 08, 2005 - 10:14 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

To try to answer your questions:

1. The slate should be identified. If it is Cathedral Gray (PA slate), it should last a good while (century, perhaps). The south side always deteriorated faster than the north side in the northern hemisphere, due to heat exposure and solar.

2. Drip edge slates are broken sometimes by ladders but usually by incorrect gutter installations.

3. Any time slates are falling out and felt is showing, there is a cause for concern. The slates should be repaired.

4. Slate will start to lift, for example, beside a chimney when the roof has settled, but the chimney has not. The stationary chimney flashing will pull the slates up as the roof drops. In other cases, the slate may lift where a sheathing board is lifting (not very likely), or where the roof is sagging, which tends to happen on timber-frame buildings such as barns, and sometimes on old churches where the roof framing was underbuilt and a horizontal purliln (a horizontal beam that the rafters sit on about halfway up the roof) causes the center of the roof to jut out, thereby making the slates stick out, too.

Joe Jenkins
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john gardom
Posted on Thursday, September 15, 2005 - 12:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Where can I find reasonable Prices on slate about 22sq. 12" X 18"

Thanks John Pgh Pa
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Michael Bazikos
Posted on Thursday, September 15, 2005 - 01:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have a question. Considering that a southern exposure deteriorates faster than any other side of a house- would you get longer service out of your roof if you laid the thickest slates on the south side? This presumes you bought Vermont slates which don't seem to be available at the 'commercial standard' thickness anymore. As your average customer will get 3/16 to 3/8 slates, is there any benefit to sorting them and laying them that way, rather than graduating them? Also, do you have any clue as to why customers get such a variation in thickness now when they didn't in the past? Is the rock of a lower quality, is it the splitters, or both?
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admin
Posted on Friday, September 16, 2005 - 12:19 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You can get standard thickness Vermont slates that are very uniform in thickness - that's shouldn't be a problem. We have never had a problem with that.
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admin
Posted on Friday, September 16, 2005 - 12:20 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

John in Pgh - do you want new [http://www.slateroofcentral.com/newslate.html] or salvaged [http://www.slateroofcentral.com/usedslate.htm] slates?
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Peter
Posted on Sunday, September 18, 2005 - 07:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi,

I haven't been here in a while but as usual I find interesting topics.

My biggest concern regarding I/W over the whole roof is there would no chance for the roof to breathe naturally and it could cause condensation under the roof deck, this applies to all types of roof not just slate.

I must agree with Joe, the thoughts of trying to nail natural slate to 1/2" plywood is scary, the bounce when trying to hand nail on such a weak surface could mean no thumbs left on the slaters hands.

Kind Regards,

Peter Crawley,

www.crawleyroofing.com
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Bill Coleman
Posted on Wednesday, February 15, 2006 - 03:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Regarding the synthetic slate: I am a residential window cleaner. With some homes you HAVE to walk on the roof to clean the windows. Curled up plastic "slate" - fake cedar shingles- break when you walk on them. The one client had his home reroofed, and within 5 years they plastic shingles had curled up.
This is in Denver, CO with our bright sun and hail. As an alternative to asphalt shingles, you might check out the new stone coat steel roofing shingles.
A couple of our clients have reroofed with the stone coat steel, and I have been on the roofs, and it seems a superior (to ashphalt) product.
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Glenn Hinchliffe
Posted on Tuesday, February 21, 2006 - 03:16 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dear Sir , I am ready to roof my home in a black slate , 1100 lbs./ square . I have read the Slate Roof Central Bible book many times .
All the slate layes in Ca. do not use interlayer felt , just 2 layers TG-2.
Why are they not using interlayer ,
Does 30# interlayer act as a cushion for the slate above it ?
Do you recommend I do use 30# interlayer ?
I have a price from a vendor of $277.00 / sq. for midnight black but its not as black as I would like it . Can you recommend a distributer that has slate as black as possible .
Thank you very much , Glenn
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Anonymous
Posted on Tuesday, February 21, 2006 - 06:44 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Try VRS (Taran Bros. Slate), they have a very good quality deep black slate called North Country Black. Ask for Steve 1-802-265-4506 Good luck and you can never, never go wrong by choosing a Vermont slate. It's a great quality slate. Their are others in the Middle Granville,NY/Fair Haven,VT area as well, just a few Hilltop Slate and Camara Slate. Your a wise man Mr. Hinchliffe for choosing the best roofing product known to man SLATE. It's also the most environment friendly product too. Use either Stainless steel or copper nails to secure the slate. I would recommend using smooth shank nails, it's a whole lot easier to repair a missing slate--later on down the road. As for your question about felt well there are differant opinions about that! I personally would recommend 30# felt. Do all your valley areas and around your chimney areas first then felt into valley areas and chimney's as you would roof it. I would recommend 20oz. copper (or same thickness in stainless steel) for the valley areas. And 16oz. copper (or same thickness in stainless steel) for chimney flashings. As for the vent pipes I would go with the copper/neopreme boot combo. Joe has them in stock (i believe) if you go to his store listed on this site. Any hips? I would slate my hips-there is samples of this in the slate roof bible. Ridges I would go with a vented copper ridge system. Why? leaves you open for options for your attic space down the road and all roofs need PROPER ventalation. Remember to vent the eves as well! Well good luck hope all turns out well for you and again you really did choose the BEST ROOFING MATERIAL known to man--for 100's of years.
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admin
Posted on Wednesday, February 22, 2006 - 01:35 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You should never install slate with felt in between the slates, only underneath. If felt is installed in between the slates, it makes it very difficult for long term maintenance of the roof due to the felt interfering with the use of the slate ripper.
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Anonymous
Posted on Wednesday, February 22, 2006 - 03:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Your right--good point. Above I did not mention to install between the slates, just want to clearify.
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Peter Squier
Posted on Monday, March 06, 2006 - 05:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I live in Austin Texas where the sun shines hot all the time. Does natural slate dissipate heat any better than synthetic slate or composition shingles?

Which is less prone to show weathering stains over time, the natural or synthetic slate?

Thanks!
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Anonymous
Posted on Tuesday, March 07, 2006 - 08:09 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

NATURAL SLATE does EVERYTHING better than fake composite slate. It's a rock!
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Consolidatedbuilders@cox.net
Posted on Tuesday, June 13, 2006 - 02:05 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

This is Consolidated Builders ,
Thank you for your answer Feb. 22, 2006 concerning inter layer between slate .
I have finished installing a black " American Slate "
Its looking very chalky , should I us a TSP solution to clean thoroughly with , or do you recommend something stronger .

Also , is there any such animal as a semi gloss sealer that can be applied to the slate after a 30 dry period to enhance the slate that wouldn't be affected by the ulta violet ray .

If there isn't any product out there that can not hold up , is there a manufacturer that make a product that will not flake or blister
but have to be applied twice a year with a Hudson sprayer ???

If at all possibe to answer asap would be appreciated due to saffoling coming down

Thank you so much .

Glenn

Owner : consolidatedbuilders @cox.net
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Anonymous
Posted on Tuesday, June 13, 2006 - 03:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Glenn,

Where did you get this slate from? Did the sales person there seriously suggest you apply a sealer to the roof? That chalky look is either because you bought a fading slate and that is what fading slate does, or it is just slate dust from the production process and it will wash off after a few good rains.
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admin
Posted on Tuesday, June 13, 2006 - 06:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sounds like you got a foreign slate that is either "fading," or has a high calcium content. There will be nothing you can do about it. Maybe post a photo on this site for further comment.
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consolldated Builders
Posted on Wednesday, June 14, 2006 - 10:26 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

To Administrator :

1. Bought slate from " American Slate " in Aneheim Calif .

2. Salesaman did not suggest sealer , that was my thought ,
as a stone enhanser to get a darker look out of it .

3. Have not cleaned with hose yet , I was awaiting your comments

4. I will wash off today and send photo .

5. Will send as attchment on e-mail address that is in your book
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Anonymous
Posted on Thursday, June 15, 2006 - 09:02 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

is this guy serious. If you got a slate why would you want a sealer on it or an enhanser as he calls it. If you don't like the look why did you buy it. American Slate sells imported chinese slate that is the reason for the color problems.

If you would have spent the extra money and gotten the slate you wanted then you would not have to worry about washing the slate and such.


I don't understand why people want a caddilac but want to pay for a ford. If you want it right pay the higher price and get the good stuff

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