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Braymer (Braymer)
Senior Member
Username: Braymer

Post Number: 76
Registered: 09-2008
Posted on Thursday, February 19, 2009 - 11:22 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I would not use it, this cotton wood tends to rot quickly, moreso than a common tulip poplar..

This text here is from the USDA website:
The wood of eastern cottonwood is light, soft, and weak. It is not durable, warps badly in drying, and is difficult to season. It is used principally for containers, interior parts of furniture, corestock in plywood, and high-grade pulp.
http://plants.usda.gov/factsheet/doc/fs_pode3.doc

It does not dry well, and rots quickly.
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Kwhord (Kwhord)
Senior Member
Username: Kwhord

Post Number: 157
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Wednesday, February 18, 2009 - 07:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Use the poplar. I think you will have a great deck with rough-sawn poplar.
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Braymer (Braymer)
Senior Member
Username: Braymer

Post Number: 74
Registered: 09-2008
Posted on Wednesday, February 18, 2009 - 08:36 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Some sawmills may take your logs in trade for rough cut pine, or work out a partial trade towards the cutting costs. If that wood has a value of similar hardwoods, it could pay for some of the cutting of the pine.
Depends on how friendly and needy the sawmills are around you and if there are alot of them, they are real friendly around here.
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Indiana_slate (Indiana_slate)
New member
Username: Indiana_slate

Post Number: 7
Registered: 10-2008
Posted on Tuesday, February 17, 2009 - 06:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks for the responses. Just to clarify what wood I am referring to, it is Populus Deltoides, also know as the Eastern Cottonwood, not yellow poplar (aka tulip poplar). Yes while it is technically a hardwood species, in reality it is a softer wood. I will probably pass on using it as I certainly don't want to put pooor quality lumber down for my sheathing even if I were to cut it thicker.
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Kwhord (Kwhord)
Senior Member
Username: Kwhord

Post Number: 155
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Wednesday, February 11, 2009 - 02:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Poplar is the native building material here. Most of the historic buildings are constructed with masonry walls because of this, but the roofs are cornices are framed and trimmed in poplar. It doesn't hold up in high moisture settings but if you build the roof properly and it has good ventilation it should last a long time in poplar.
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Joe (Joe)
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 359
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Wednesday, February 11, 2009 - 01:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Indiana - I have used 1" tulip poplar as roof sheathing with good results. What other poplar would you be talking about? Aspen?
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Braymer (Braymer)
Senior Member
Username: Braymer

Post Number: 71
Registered: 09-2008
Posted on Tuesday, February 10, 2009 - 01:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Polpar is actually a hard wood.
The listed properties say that it has a poor resistatnce to rotting and moisture.
http://www.woodzone.com/properties.htm

Poplar (Populus spp.)
Type-- Hardwood.

Physical Props :: Most species are typically soft and light with low ratings for strength, stiffness, shock resistance, decay resistance, and steam bending. Moderate movement in service.

I have never seen poplar roof boards, mostly Pine or Hemlock. These are time proven.
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Tim_dittmar (Tim_dittmar)
Advanced Member
Username: Tim_dittmar

Post Number: 46
Registered: 05-2008
Posted on Tuesday, February 10, 2009 - 11:48 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Indiana- not sure about the difference in the varieties of poplar- perform nailing experiments on a properly dried sample with the pertinent "centers" supporting the test board. Could be you'd need to use a longer plank with multiple simulated rafters to get an accurate, relative test of how copper(or other appropriate) nails might do.... also inquire if said poplar is really a good choice for am exterior application of the duration slate roofs are capable of furnishing- does that species respond rapidly and badly to chronic wetting and dampness?
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Indiana_slate (Indiana_slate)
New member
Username: Indiana_slate

Post Number: 6
Registered: 10-2008
Posted on Sunday, February 08, 2009 - 08:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Does anyone have experience with using poplar (as in common poplar, not tulip poplar) for roof sheathing? I have a lot of trees that I wouldn't mind taking down and cutting into 1 inch thick planks prior to installing 1/4 inch slate however I am concerned about its strength since it is a soft wood. Maybe 1.5 inches thick would be stronger?
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carl sternecker
New member
Username: Stoney

Post Number: 3
Registered: 05-2008
Posted on Wednesday, May 14, 2008 - 01:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

AJG,
What are you doning for insulation. Im in a cold clime (Wisconsin) also with cathedral ceilings. Insulation and ventilation issues seem to be very important.
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Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 166
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Sunday, August 05, 2007 - 02:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

2x6 would make a nice, solid roof deck.
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AJG
New member
Username: Oldsch

Post Number: 1
Registered: 07-2007
Posted on Tuesday, July 31, 2007 - 10:20 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I was thinking of using regular 2x6's for sheathing. (terne metal roof)
I can buy 2x6's at Home Cheapo for what amounts to $1.05 sq/ft. This is cheaper than kiln dried 4/4 from the sawmill. I'd like for the wood to be dry because the sheathing will be enclosed.
(The roof is a cathedral w/ exposed rafters.)
Any problems using 2x6's ?

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