SHINGLE ROOF WITH VENTILATION WILL LA... Log Out | Topics | Search
Moderators | Register | Edit Profile

Slate Roof Central Message Board » Ice and Water Membrane, Plywood, and other Controversies » SHINGLE ROOF WITH VENTILATION WILL LAST 50 YEARS. « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Joe Jenkins
Posted on Sunday, August 13, 2006 - 07:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Slate can be installed on "battens" or "slate lath" and has been for centuries. These are strips of wood as small as 1"x2" spaced to take the slating nails. A solid deck, however, is stronger, more durable, easier to repair or restore generations later, and creates a more solid structure when building with wood.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ranko Tomic
Posted on Saturday, August 12, 2006 - 08:35 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is roof decking always necessary? If one uses clay tiles that are not layed on decking, and the roof is cold, shall he have to deck the roof?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ULTIMATE EXTERIOR
Posted on Tuesday, September 17, 2002 - 08:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

A PROPERLY VENTILATED ROOF, WITH ASPHALT SHINGLES AND PROPER UNDERLAYMENT(YES, ICE AND WATER, AS WELL AS TAR PAPER) WILL LAST AS LONG AS 50 YEARS. WITH A LOT LESS COST THAN SLATE ROOFING. OUT WITH THE OLD AND IN WITH THE NEW. I'M SUPRISED YOU SLATE LAYERS EVEN HAVE A WEB SITE, THAT YOU DON'T CHISEL YOUR THOUGHTS ON STONE.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

admin
Posted on Wednesday, September 18, 2002 - 10:05 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Nice try, but who has *ever* seen a 50 year old asphalt shingle roof? Most 20 year old asphalt roofs, if they last that long, look pretty nasty. For 50 years who wants to look at an ugly roof? Then when you tear it off it's a huge pile of garbage. Slate roofs (properly installed) are still the least expensive roof when the entire life of the roof is taken into consideration. And they look good, are natural, and non-toxic. Maybe out of your league.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Anonymous
Posted on Sunday, October 13, 2002 - 08:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

how long does a slate roof last?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

admin
Posted on Monday, October 14, 2002 - 09:14 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Depends on the type of slate. We routinely do restoration work on roofs with Vermont slate, or PA Peach Bottom, and sometimes VA Buckingham slate,that are already 100 years old and, after restoration work (replacing flashing metal, repairing slates)are expected to last another 75.

I stayed in a house on Scotland that was 215 years old with the original slate roof.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

SlateGuy@neslate.com
Posted on Monday, October 14, 2002 - 10:16 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Check out the photos on this Web Page (dated roofs).

http://www.neslate.com/PhotosDated.html

SlateGuy
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Joe Jenkins (Admin)
Posted on Tuesday, October 15, 2002 - 12:03 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Wow, nice photos. Where are those roofs?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

JimGermond
Posted on Tuesday, October 22, 2002 - 11:25 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Joe said:
"By Joe Jenkins (Admin) on Tuesday, October 15, 2002 - 12:03 am:

"Wow, nice photos. Where are those roofs? "

Well, the 1851 roof, as you know, is in your book - it's on Scotch Hill Road, Fair Haven, VT. The 1880 Barn is near Lake Champlain on the road to Mount Independence, the 1881 barn, (the Hathaway Barn) is in Rutland Town, the 1884 roof is in Monkton, the 1893 is in Charlotte and the 1904 roof is in Whiting... (Vermont)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Anonymous
Posted on Wednesday, July 02, 2003 - 04:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I wouldn't think of anything other than a slate roof on my house -- I am currently living in a house with a slate roof from 1930 and have just purchased another one with a slate roof from 1940. But I am going to modify them, as I would like to add a continuous ridge vent and soffit ventilation to cool the space below the slates and make the attics tolerable..... I am planning on making a copper ridge top to go over the ridge vent....unless anyone has some other ideas....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

mike
Posted on Thursday, July 03, 2003 - 08:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We used cora-vent under two by ten western red cedar -cut to fit the peak- then bent copper "pans" that interlocked and finished it with a hemmed copper top. Works well.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bob Wewer
Posted on Wednesday, January 07, 2004 - 09:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

A response to "Ultimate Exterior" at the top: What does Ice & Water Shield have to do with the longevity of an asphalt roof? The newer fiberglass based asphalt shingles are not lasting any longer than the organic based shingles. Don't believe the #Number on the wrapper for the years. His ventilation idea is correct, but for most guys, that means slapping on a ridge vent and saluting.

Obviously another transient...


Ice and Water Shield

The onset of the ice & water shield usage in the northeast after the great ice storms of the early 90ís has brought with it a mentality that has made for the profession a strange enigma. The experience that is forever embedded on the minds of those that dwelled under the massive influx of water resulting from ice dams has caused the mandate of ice and water shield usage in the installation of new roofing systems. This is much like a doctor that treats the symptom, rather than offering a cure. Ventilation is almost always the way to cure such problems. The costliness of doing the job right often involves a redesign of the situation. Many times, with a little education, more can be done with the proper approach that can afford a lasting roofing system, and a healthier environment for those living inside the dwelling. Visit us at: http://www.fourseasonsroofingandsiding.com
to find out more.

The enigma comes in with the transient nature of the industry and the employment of techniques that are improper. Roofing flashings are usually laborious to replace properly and almost always neglected. With a strong underlayment, an actual flashing leak can be disguised for several years. The leak, while unnoticed by the building owner, is poised to present a major problem down the road. The mentality that ice & water shield is the cure-all is just wrong. The only time the underlayment should be wet is in the event of catastrophic weather conditions.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Anonymous
Posted on Friday, January 09, 2004 - 02:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Or Ice Dams.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Walter Musson
Posted on Saturday, January 10, 2004 - 08:23 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ice and water shield is not a cure all but another item in a roofers arsenal which if used properly will help prevent some unwanted backup from entering the homeowners prized residence.
As each roof has different dynamics ,a blanket statement of the type above is not in the clients best interest.
Homeowners insurance is rapidly becoming unaffordable and hard to procure for many homes in the Northeast,so claims are to be avoided if possible.This makes one think out their strategy to avoid callbacks and subsequent damage from back up problems.
I agree totally in the value of proper ventilation,but sometimes it isn't easily done on some older structures.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Anonymous
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 11:53 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hey ... nothing wrong with ice & water shield..just the mentality that uses it as a primary roofing system, by relying upon it in the place of proper procedure.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Anonymous
Posted on Monday, August 16, 2004 - 05:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Slate Roofs Don't Need Ice and Water Membrane by Joseph Jenkins

The heat loss through a breathable roof is what keeps the dam from occurring? Is this correct? So in order to have this work the homes efficiency must be poor or should I say expensive to heat. These days
the cost of heat is so different from a hundred years ago that the breathable
roof becomes less and less attractive....solution?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

admin
Posted on Tuesday, August 17, 2004 - 10:38 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The "breathability" of a roof has nothing to do with heat loss or insulation value. The air transfer through a breathable roof occurs above (exterior to) the insulation. This allows the roof decking to "breathe."
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Anonymous
Posted on Tuesday, August 17, 2004 - 10:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

is it then best that the roof deck be cold to prevent melting that would lead to damming at the eve?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

admin
Posted on Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 10:17 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

In cold climates, it's best that the roof be well insulated. This can be achieved by a "cold roof" strategy, or by simply insulating between the rafters, or in the attic floor in a ventilated attic.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Anonymous
Posted on Wednesday, August 18, 2004 - 05:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

thanks again
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Anonymous
Posted on Saturday, March 18, 2006 - 05:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have an asphalt roof, no problems, 30 yrs old,but roofer says it time to replace, is th is true?

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Program Credits Administration