In depth comparison of New England sl... Log Out | Topics | Search
Moderators | Register | Edit Profile

Slate Roof Central Message Board » Quality of Roofing Slate » In depth comparison of New England slates? « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dan Monty
New member
Username: Danmonty007

Post Number: 1
Registered: 07-2008
Posted on Thursday, July 17, 2008 - 05:46 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Have 25-30 square of black 7 by 9 excellent salvaged roofing slate located in Worcester Mass.Call for details.1-774-535-5955
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Joe Jenkins
Posted on Thursday, July 13, 2006 - 09:50 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Jeff G,

What size are the slates?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jeff G
Posted on Thursday, July 13, 2006 - 07:40 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Jim K, Joe and others-
I have standard square Pennsylvania black on a 70 y.o. home in Maryland that has need of a couple dozen replacements, which I am going to fix with the help of Joe's book and other references. What kind of price range should I expect if I go to a relcaimed slate dealer?


Thanks!

Jeff G.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Suji
Posted on Tuesday, September 20, 2005 - 02:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'd like to see a comparison table of the different slates that helps explain the differences between the NE offerings. For example--is there a qualitative difference among and between the various greens/grey-greens and the VT greys/blacks. Which are scarce versus plentiful. What is pricing based on in terms of the quality of offerings.

I have also seen some close pricing between PA black and VT sea green. I think I read some where that certain sea-green quarries have a shorter life-span than those "120 year sea greens" mentioned elsewhere.

How does the slate buyer become aware of which quarries have the quality product and which outfits need more quality controls in place--especially if buying out of state for the first time?

The internet is full of ad men for slate--how do you know before you put down your money? Inquiring minds want to know.

Love the Slate Bible. Still looking for this kind of info though.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Anonymous
Posted on Tuesday, September 20, 2005 - 10:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yes, I've noticed that the Bible does not address the most fundamentally important issues facing the audience for which it was written~ how does the lay person i.e. non slater not get screwed by the quarries~ or other ad men for slate ~

Some quarries produce fine slate, some produce junk. Some quarries produce fine slate and junk. Some quarries are ethical, some are not. Some ad men are ethical, some are not. Consider slate a black art, or at least an ancient art. You will become aware of the smoke and mirror illusions of the charlatan's, which will help guide you to the honest men who make a living from stone.

I don't have your answers, however your questions are very worthy. Only the guys in the trade have this knowledge, and I would tend to believe that your inquiry is delving into hard earned trade secrets that most are unwilling to convey to the public.

Perhaps you will get lucky, and someone will take you under their wing. I can only offer that you methodically do your homework. Become a student, ask lots of questions, and cross reference. Whatever you purchase~hold back 10 % as leverage.

Caveat emptor !
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

admin
Posted on Tuesday, September 20, 2005 - 11:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I looked at two slate roofs recently, both on rural residences constructed in the late 1800s. Both Vermont sea green, both in western PA (about 30 miles apart). One was totally shot and needed replaced. The slate was soft and flaking - completely falling apart. The other was almost as good as new - no visible deterioration - and could conceivably last another century. When the slate was quarried, I doubt that anyone could have predicted which slate would last longer. We're faced with the same predicament today. Rock deposits vary from place to place and even at different depths in the same quarry. You just can't know for sure how long the slate you're buying is going to last. Stick with a known material with a historical track record for longevity (Vermont sea green slate, for example) and buy the slate from a company that takes pride in it's slate production, understands the rock (knows a good grain when it sees it, for example), and is selective about the material it uses to produce roofing slates (versus, say, the material it uses for flooring slate). Then hope for the best (for your great grandkids' sake).

Joe Jenkins
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jim K in PA
Posted on Wednesday, September 21, 2005 - 01:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

There is no quick and easy path to enlightenment for most subjects, especially with slate. As anonymous says, do your homework, learn as much as you can, and be prepared to walk away from a lot of slate. There are no "deals". Shop around and determine the going rate for new or salvaged slate in the type you want.

I don't think that Joe's book, or anyone else's for that matter, can adequately teach someone how to differentiate good slate from bad. There are physical qualities, telltale signs and non-quantifiable factors that help any purchaser of slate determine what may be good or bad. But, as Joe pointed out, it may still be impossible to tell just how long a slate will last. That is why I have purchased good quality reclaimed slate, and I am very satisfied with what I have purchased.

With respect to seperating Charlatans from honest slate dealers, go with reputation, references and common sense. Not being in a hurry to buy will help your perspective immensely.


Jim K in PA

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Program Credits Administration