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Appinstructor (Appinstructor)
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Username: Appinstructor

Post Number: 1
Registered: 03-2009
Posted on Wednesday, March 25, 2009 - 10:56 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

you should perform the "ring test" twice before its punch after its punch
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Phil Wilden
Posted on Tuesday, August 01, 2006 - 09:20 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ringing the slate as a test for of quality is party true.

The sound you hear depends on the density and thickness of the slate, but it in itself is not a test for quality of the product.

I have known of slates that ring like the finest sounding church bell, but will rust and start to disintegrate within months of installation.

An experienced roofing contractor will ring a slate to see if there is a fuzzy sound to the ring, if there is the slate has a crack and he wont put it on the roof.

www.cembritblunn.co.uk
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Anonymous
Posted on Friday, October 03, 2003 - 02:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have been told that one can judge the quality, or alternatively, the useful life of a slate by tapping it with a metallic object. The harder slates have a ring to it, and softer slates sound duller.

Is this an accurate test of (1) the quality of the slate? or (2) the useful life remaining in a slate? Another way of asking the second question is: does a hard slate lose its "ring" after many years?
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Walter Musson
Posted on Friday, October 03, 2003 - 07:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Another way is to punch a nail hole in the slate with your slate hammer.If you can make a nail sized hole with one or two "whacks",with a proper amount of relief on the face side,then it probably will last some length of time.If,when you hit it the point goes thru with no apparent resistance then its probably not suitable for re-use.After time you can almost tell when you pick one up if it's hard enough for use.
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Tuesday, October 07, 2003 - 09:34 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The answer to your question is more complex than simple. There are subtle nuances involved in determining the quality of used slates. The ring is part of it, but most older slates (100 years old) do not ring much unless they are particularly hard, such as maybe some old Peach Bottom or some strains of Buckingham. New slates always ring unless they're cracked. The best way to know if an older slate is any good is to know what type it is, what approximate age it is, and then examine it visually for surface delamination and softness. Punching a nail hole in the slate will reveal the hardness of it, although an experienced slater can tell simply by holding it. Even a reputable, old, hard slate with a degree of softness will last a long time renailed to a roof. The only slates that are notorious for not being reusable are the Lehigh-Northampton PA black slates. Some sea green strains will also become soft after 125 years, but most don't. If it looks like a good piece of stone while holding it in your hand, then it will most likely make a good roof.
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m. timmer
Posted on Saturday, December 13, 2003 - 12:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have purchased some reclaimed peach bottom recently ~60 yrs old, 10x18, and 12x18 from a classified on this site. After iniall sorting for thickness I noted breakage of ~50 slate/crate. I am able to use these on the roof, but what I found after getting under way were slates with a hairline crack visible from both sides running mostly vertical on the slate, this was easier to spot on a damp slate as a black line. At first I incorporated these slates, but as I became more familiar with them I found I could snap these slates in two very easily especially when cutting, always following the crack. The roof is still in progress and after installing 15 sq.I estimate a 10-15% breakage factor. As you can imagine this creates a lot of extra labor. I am unable to use these slates because my roof is all hips. Is anybody famiar with this slate? I purchased it from a classified on this site and would be intersted to know if anyone else who purchased from this lot is having any problems, the seller says that I am the only one.
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Chuck Tanguay
Posted on Tuesday, August 23, 2005 - 08:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I think it is a big mistake to lay any slate roof without 'ringing' each slate with the hammer as you prepare to nail it. It takes next to no time and uncovers a myriad of bad slates 'before' they are laid. It is the sign of a good slater.

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