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Jim Thompson
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Username: Jatbham

Post Number: 1
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Tuesday, March 20, 2007 - 03:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Where can I buy 120 squares of Buckingham Slate. I need to match slate on my house that was built in 1928.
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annrea
Posted on Friday, August 29, 2003 - 06:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We are planning to replace a slate roof and have found a potential source of salvaged Buckingham slate about 25-50 years old. A local roofer with experience with slate roofing relates a poor experience with Buckingham slate because of cupping of the slate; 1/3 of the slate was rejected because of cupping. Is this typical? Our renovation budget doesn't have much flexibility.
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Saturday, August 30, 2003 - 12:04 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That sounds pretty far-fetched. If the slate is cupped, it came that way out of the quarry. It is not going to bend over time.
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Walter Musson
Posted on Saturday, August 30, 2003 - 08:01 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Joe,
They are talking about Don Gills recycled slate that is Buckingham,only about 30 years old which was already on a bank building.
Another slater from Southern Maine told them of a load of freshly quarried Buckingham that he had a cupping problem with ,in which he had to reject up to a third.
Has anyone heard of this problem.
What I've used of Buckingham has always been good,although in Maine I don't use it often.
Being salvage which has already been used on a roof,I would think any cupped slates would have been culled in that installation.
Obviously as you said there is no way for time to cup them after they are quarried.
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slateworks
Posted on Saturday, August 30, 2003 - 04:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi,Could your slate be Spainish?Thought I was bieng to picky-We are working on a project that involves Spainish slate and these slate are cupped,rippled,curled ect.straight from the Quarry,The worst part is they sent these slate to replace slate that had failed after 14 years,Lots of pyrite?rust viens,split and cracked ,Rusty run off made pin holes in lead coated copper box gutters ect..Evergreen sent them as clear black 14 years ago,they bought them off Williams and son,who bought them from Spain,They replaced the material at no cost to the Home owner.We have rejected many slate and I am in the process of sending some samples back to WIlliams & Son,When I called they said I have recieved a good load of slate ect.,Yes Many are okay,These are the first slate I have seen like this in 24 years of roof work.We just need 400 pcs.to finish the job,That's half of the bad ones.. That's my cupped slate story.
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Don Gill
Posted on Saturday, August 30, 2003 - 06:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If indeed we are talking about Don Gill's slate, none of it is cupped. It has all been re-inspected when packed on pallets (edge ways) for immediate safe shipping. This 80 squares of Buckingham slate is extremely sound and only 30 years old. The slate was salvaged from an insurance job whereby a Bank Building was damaged my a toranado in Mississippi and the onwners did not want to try to match and replace the damaged slate and instead decided to replace the entire 120 square project with standing seam copper roof.
Since I'm quite sure the bank was well insured and being in a toranado prone area, this was probably a good dicision on their part. Since advertizing this product I have had quite a few interested parties but all were looking for a residentual scale size tiles. My tiles are of commercial thickness and 16" x 24" dimension on the flat plane. I have exhausted all of my sample supply but the slate can still be inspected locally. All of the potential customers who received samples were completely satisfied with the quality but needed a smaller scale tile for their projects. The slate I have will be inspected Tueday, Sept. 2nd, by a local Register Architect on behalf of an interested party in Maine with whom I am currently negotiating a possible sale. As far as I am concerned the slate is still for sale to the first party to deposit funds based on a selling price of $15,000 plus shipping for the entire 80 square lot. If you know anything about Buckingham slate, you will realize this is way below market price. Again, this excellent slate will go to the most expedient buyer. Thanks, Don Gill, 601 582 4298.
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Sunday, August 31, 2003 - 09:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I would think that the problem of cupped slates would be a rare one that would occur when the slate shingles are split out of rock that has been stressed in the ground in such a manner that the shingles come out slightly curved. This is not common, but it does happen and I have culled out some curved slates from shipments of new Vermont sea green slates. So if someone has seen a batch of Buckingham slates that have some curved pieces in the batch, that would not be an indication that Buckingham slates are like that in general. They are not. It's more a matter of poor quality control at the quarry. A good quarry production crew will remove or cull out defective slates before they're packed into pallets. I, personally, have never seen a buckingham slate that was curved in any way.
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Don Gill
Posted on Tuesday, September 02, 2003 - 12:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have just returned from a meeting with a local Architect who inspected the slate I have for sell.
It was not a surprize to receive his seal of approval. "NO CUPPING OR ANY OTHER FLAWS"! "EXCELLENT CONDITION"!
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annrea
Posted on Wednesday, September 17, 2003 - 09:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thank you so much for the expert advice! We have decided to purchase the recycled Buckingham slate on the basis of the information you have provided.
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janibugblue
Posted on Sunday, September 25, 2005 - 12:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Joe,

I am considering using Buckingham slate for kitchen countertops. Any suggestions, cautions, concerns?

How does the price per sg. ft. compare with granite/Corian?

And-does it require special skills to install? I live in Crozet, VA. and can easily travel to Arvonia. Should I? I need to find the most cost effective way to get the look I think that can be achieved with this beautiful blue-black slate. Jan Rodgers
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Wednesday, September 28, 2005 - 09:27 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I don't know anything about using slate for countertops, but I'm sure the folks at the quarry will be able to help you.

Joe

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