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Michael James Hill
Posted on Tuesday, October 17, 2006 - 03:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

This is a very impresive roof, the slating around the eyebrow is simply beautiful. I also like the staggered butt slating, this is'nt something we see here in England but it is something that I would like to do, that and ragged butt slating. The Slate Roof Bible inspires good work and fires the imagination. Good luck with the whole project.
Mike Hill.
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Thomas Massie
Posted on Tuesday, October 17, 2006 - 02:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Joe and Jim! Here are four photos of the underlying wood work. I more or less just tried to implement the pictures of the woodwork (eyebrow and tower examples) that I saw in the slate roof bible. This is what I did:

1. told my wife to pick out and buy a window that she liked. checked the dimensions to see that it would fit between the purlins of my timberframe. They sell real eyebrow shaped windows, but they were big bucks, so we just bought an arched window and I "created" the corners of the eyebrow with plywood. (later I'll face the plywood with copper or slate or stucco)

2. Tied that window into the existing timberframe. Basically, made two little posts for each side of the window. Bottoms of these posts are birdsmouthed and sit on the purlins of my timberframe. Bent and nailed a strip of plywood over the top of the window and the top of the posts. Nailed the posts to the purlins. (shhhh. don't tell the timber frame discussion group about those nails. pegging just wasn't feasible there)

3. cut all of the tongue and groove ceilings to fit. (tedious, 12 hours for this step) The t&g is part of the structure I guess - helps keep the window plumb. The window frame is at this point, an integral part of the dormer. Should the window ever get broken, the glass will have to be replaced - not the frame!!!

4. built a shelf below the outside of the window. this was just something I had to do to accomodate the insulation part of my roof. I guess I could have placed the window further outboard and avoided the shelf outside, but that would have created a shelf inside the house, and the window wouldn't have been sitting directly on the purlin like I wanted. Anyway, the shelf came in handy to stand on while slating the lower part of the dormer.

5. cobbled up some supports, shims, etc. to form "bulkheads" for the 1x4's to nail to. Found the 1x4's to be too stiff to conform to the shape I wanted, so I went back to the saw mill and cut green 1/2 x 4's. Nailed these to the bulkheads. Halfway through, found it to be too bouncy. Correct sol'n would have been to add more bulkheads. Instead, I bent some plywood and slid it behind the 1/2x4's, and screwed the boards to these plywood strips with stainless screws. This helped tie everything together.

** many weeks pass**

6. worked ont eh shelf some more. flashed the shelf, and the corners of the eyebrow. Pain in the butt.

** many weeks pass, rest of house requires attention, many irons in the fire, stress accumulates, percveived magnitude of the task grows as I procrastinate the next step. Consider calling Joe Jenkins to bail me out, "whatever the cost." **

7. tried to invent curved copper drip edge. didn't work (I don't have any copper working experience and it just wasn't happening for me).

** many weeks pass, starting to hate Joe Jenkins and his slate roof bible for allowing my wife to see a picture of an eyebrow dormer in the first place. ;) **

just used flat pieces of copper. looks fine. (the wife signed off on it)

8. laid the slate courses with terne coated stainless between courses. ran out of terne, switched to copper. (btw, I used $400 of TCS that I had for the project, plus another $300 of 16 oz. copper flashing I was saving for another part of the roof. yikes)

If I had it to do over again, (and I hope I don't!) I would have used more bulkheads under the wood sheeting. The sheeting was, in places, unsuitably bouncy which made nailing the slate very difficult. Most of the nails also had to be driven through stainless flashing as well! You know the going is tough when you start going through your nail apron and selecting the sharper looking nails!!! 2/3's of the way through the slating process, I sprayed 4 cans of "great-stuff" under the sheeting boards to fill up the void and take out some of the bounce. It helped, but it was no silver bullet.

Just another note, where slate nail holes lined up with cracks in the vertical sheeting (hate it when that happens!), I would go up about 3 inches and punch (or drill if the slate was already partially fastened) a hole in the middle of the slate. You wouldn't normally put a nail here on slate, but I figured it was OK, since all of the nails were ultimately flashed over with TCS.

In all seriousness, I am very appreciative to you Joe for showing us examples of eyebrow dormers in your book. I have an octagonal tower to slate next and I am thumbing through the pages of your book looking for ideas. Got any more tower pictures you could show us?!

I have some more of our eyebrow pictures (and descriptions) on my timberframe blog:

http://massiehouse.blogspot.com




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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Monday, October 16, 2006 - 07:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Impressive. Do you have a photo of the wood work under the slate? I would like to see that.

joe@joseph-jenkins.com
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Jim Korczak
Posted on Monday, October 16, 2006 - 10:54 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Fantastic work Thomas, as it has been all through your project. That is quite a castle your creating. Thanks for sharing the journey.
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Thomas Massie
Posted on Saturday, October 14, 2006 - 11:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It has been slow going, but I think I just about have it figured out now. By far, the hardest part is/was the intersection between the outside window sill and the roof. The fact that my roof has 10" of thickness to accomodate insulation really seemed to complicate things. In other words, figuring out what to build and how to flash it was very difficult, but laying the slate has been easy (compared to the first part), but s_l_o_w.

(Slate is unfading gray and unfading green from Camara Slate. Inspiration is from the Slate Roof Bible.)

eyebrow in  progress

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