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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Monday, October 16, 2006 - 07:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Here's a photo of what Ron's talking about. Thanks to Chris Paulin of Paulin Slate and Copper (Akron, OH) for this photo.Curved Eaves Filler Slates
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ron kugel
Posted on Friday, October 13, 2006 - 10:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The open ends of the curvature can be filled with smaller pcs. of slate by leaving your wood strips about 3" short of the end --fill under your full courses with smaller pcs of slate cut to fit the openings -either nail or use some type of sealant/adhesive to hold in place.
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Friday, October 13, 2006 - 01:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

When slate is installed over curved areas there is usually wood built in under the slate to form a curved surface. Where the slate bridges over an empty space, you can install additional furring strips or other strips of wood that will provide backing and nailing support. Remember that you may then have open ends where the curvature exists, which you will probably have to deal with in some way.
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Mac Hathaway
Posted on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 - 04:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Joe,

I've gotten some recycled slate (Vt. sea green, this time). It's going on my garage, I'm half-way done, and I am pondering my next step.

The garage has an upper hip-roof with maybe a 10:12 slope, with a shed roof coming off the bottom (on the front of the garage) with a lower pitch of about about 4:12. The junction of the upper (steeper) roof with the lower (flatter) roof forms a sort of horizontal "valley", although I've not see what the proper name for this junction in called. (It's exactly the situation covered on page 257-8 of SRB v.1) I was thinking I would slate over the junction between these two slopes by going from my standard 18" slate to something like 13" or 12" long (or shorter), with some kind of wooden shim above each course to help support the overlaying course, so that each slate would not only be supported at it's top and bottom edge. This way, I'd have maybe three or so courses with a shorter exposure, to ease around the corner from the lower roof to the upper one. Sort of like the European style of slating a valley with narrower slates, instead of copper. I think this would look nice, but I'm concerned that the slate won't like not being supported over most of its length, and crack under snow loading, falling branches, or what-have-you.

Ever seen such a thing?

The other option is to just use copper flashing from the upper roof to the lower, like the book shows for a shed roof dormer. Not as cool, or as long lasting, but maybe more robust until the copper wears out...

Any thoughts or suggestions? I didn't see anything like this (slating the junction) in the book, only the copper flashed version...

Thanks!

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