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Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 1167
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Wednesday, May 04, 2016 - 07:58 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ha! Of course Old School is "on the money" After all, Old School is "Old School". Me and Abe Lincoln went to school together; well he did graduate a couple years after me anyway. It was not too long after that house was built.

In Joe's book, he does show a barn with the slates gapped sideways about 4 inches that was made for hay. As long as there is adequate intake (in this case the whole lower barn let in air) the direction of air flow at the slate level is always out, so nothing will blow in through the slates. this is the same principal that we are talking about here, and it works for every kind of roof. The air has to move as it heats and you have to make it so that it works for you. Balanced ventilation is the way to go.
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Catfeesh (Catfeesh)
Senior Member
Username: Catfeesh

Post Number: 53
Registered: 12-2011
Posted on Tuesday, May 03, 2016 - 09:26 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It's an issue with my cabin. Although I installed my slate by-the-book on lumber sheathing, I didn't use tar paper. Because the slate doesn't create a perfect seal, when conditions are just right snow does blow in. I did what little I could do to prevent snow melt from making a mess downstairs. Although my attic is vented, I don't have eave vents so Old School may be right on the money.

some pics of my attic:
http://jenkinsslate.com/messages/messages/3/8548.html
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Robo (Robo)
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Username: Robo

Post Number: 4
Registered: 04-2016
Posted on Thursday, April 21, 2016 - 05:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I took these three today with my phone. The first one shows the slates that appear to be overnailed and are tipped up at the bottom. Do you agree?

The second one tries to show the headlap. It's difficult to see from the ground, but it's there.

The third one is inside the attic where you can see the blown in cellulose right up to the eaves. Note: there are yankee gutters. This pic also shows a little light showing through here and there between slates indicating that there is certainly airflow. (hmm, I dunno why, but this one is rotated 90 degrees - you'll have to do the same with your head)



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Robo (Robo)
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Username: Robo

Post Number: 3
Registered: 04-2016
Posted on Thursday, April 21, 2016 - 05:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

OK, these first three pics were taken in May 2013 when the roof was being installed. Not too much of interest and little evidence of "tipping":
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Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 1162
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Wednesday, April 20, 2016 - 05:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Just try and post them. If it works, you are golden and if not you have to change something. either way you win.

Get up into the attic and look towards the soffit. If there is insulation jammed against the bottom of the roof deck and you CAN'T see any light at the soffit, it is plugged. That is of more concern than the tipped slates as far as the snow in the attic goes. let us know. good luck.
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Robo (Robo)
New member
Username: Robo

Post Number: 2
Registered: 04-2016
Posted on Wednesday, April 20, 2016 - 09:33 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Well, I'm going to have to get a ladder up there and have a look. That may take a little time. When the job was being done (and I was less well-educated on slating) I took a few pics from the contractor's ladder. I'm not sure if they are too large for this bulletin board but I'll try to attach them. [taken in May 2013] The "tipping" that I mentioned is not very evident in these pics, but I could see it with the naked eye from the ground. I may be able to see something with some binocs. I'll look for the starter lath and the headlap specifically.

hmmm. pics too large. Not sure how to reduce their size.
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Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 1161
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Tuesday, April 19, 2016 - 10:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Very interesting! You provided the answer to your own question and didn't even know it. A 1790's stone farmhouse didn't' have ANY insulation in it. It was also cold and drafty. A drafty house is by definition venting itself. When you introduced insulation into the picture, you alter the dynamic of the structure. When you add insulation, you have to increase the ventilation at the same time. If they closed off the soffits with insulation, what is happening is that the air being lazy is now entering from the top of the roof and taking the snow with it into the attic. If the air was flowing out naturally, it would be going the other direction. It is also interesting that the slates are "tipping up" I would also bet that they forgot to put the lath at the bottom to tip the slates and they are all rocking because of that.
Who installed the slates? Did they read Joe's book? We need a little bit more information. Say on!
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Robo (Robo)
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Username: Robo

Post Number: 1
Registered: 04-2016
Posted on Tuesday, April 19, 2016 - 08:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I do some volunteer work with a local non-profit. They recently had a slate roof replaced on a magnificent 1790s stone farmhouse.

Yesterday the staff told me that during the winter they had several small snowdrifts in the attic, which eventually melted through the attic floor boards, through the blown-in cellulose and has damaged the plaster ceilings.

In looking at the roof from the outside, I see numerous slates that show evidence of overnailing - they are tipped up at the bottom edge of the slate. Could this be the problem? Or is it likely some other problem. I have not done any other research yet as to the installation - such as headlap, sidelap etc.

Incidentally, the previous slate roof that was removed had all the joints mortared from the attic. Quite unusual looking. Both (old and new) roofs are/were installed on lath.

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