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Joe (Joe)
Moderator
Username: Joe

Post Number: 829
Registered: 07-2006


Posted on Wednesday, July 09, 2014 - 11:19 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

What Home Inspectors Need To Know About Slate Roofs (PDF article #1):

http://www.traditionalroofing.com/downloads/ASHI_article_4_05.pdf


What Home Inspectors Need To Know About Slate Roofs (PDF article #2):

http://www.traditionalroofing.com/downloads/SlateRoofs.pdf
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Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 1072
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Saturday, July 05, 2014 - 07:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

A slate roof is not "good" because it is old, but normally old because it is "good" 95% of my slate repairs are repairing old repairs. You just have to have someone there that gives a hoot, has the right tools and knows how to do a repair. It looks to be in great shape.
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Inspector (Inspector)
New member
Username: Inspector

Post Number: 2
Registered: 07-2014
Posted on Friday, July 04, 2014 - 02:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks guys, for the advice and help in putting a narrative and recommendation together. I'm assuming anytime I note shingles that are broken off or missing, I should recommend an evaluation and repair? In the attic space there was evidence of water penetration but a moisture meter showed no elevated moisture levels at the time of the inspection. It's been pretty dry for a little while so I cannot really determine that there is an active leak or if it was previous. Another concern, and I suppose, question would be the effect the lack of proper ventilation has on slate. There was no means of ventilating this attic and it was extremely hot. There are small gable windows that were closed/sealed and could not be opened, that could be replaced with some louvered vents to resolve this issue. I have attached a couple more photos that give a closer look at the slate that may be helpful. I have a lot to learn with regard to identifying the slate, but really appreciate your help. I will note the contact information that was provided should I get a request for the referral of a slate contractor.
Thanks!
Bob







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John_chan (John_chan)
Senior Member
Username: John_chan

Post Number: 146
Registered: 08-2006
Posted on Friday, July 04, 2014 - 12:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The slate looks like it's Peach Bottom, but I'd need to see better pictures to be sure. This type of slate is a very long lasting slate and should be repaired rather than replaced.

There doesn't appear to be any chimney flashing on one of them, as the chimney has tar and mortar smeared around it. The other chimney has some mill finish aluminum around it. Both chimneys need to have the slates around the chimneys removed and the chimney needs to be re-flashed in copper.

There are a number of bad repairs on it as seen by the tar and the mis-matched slate.

The valleys are extremely rusted. They should be either rust neutralized and painted or replaced with copper.

You can contact our Maryland office at 240-650-9780 or www.durableslate.com for more information. It's not too far from York.
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Kwhord (Kwhord)
Senior Member
Username: Kwhord

Post Number: 284
Registered: 10-2006


Posted on Friday, July 04, 2014 - 11:27 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The inspection narrative must take into consideration many things. This appears to be a durable variety of slate (ie: NOT black penn). So it is a great candidate for restoration. Black penn roofs are a different story and at this point most of them are better to be replaced than repaired.

To properly assess slate you need to be able to identify the slate. The slate bible is a really good resource for this but it also helps to just get a few samples of the type of slate you have in your area, then you can match them up. Black penn is soft and chalky after 80 years, other better quality slates will still ring true.

Also, if the homeowners budget is a concern sometimes it's better to do a proper restoration on say: a chimney and leave a valley for next season or something. It depends on when the roof needs most. If they are getting water entry from missing tiles than that should be the first area of repair.

It is good that you are recognizing the slate is an asset and should not be replaced just because it is "old". I wish every inspector was as informed as you!
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Inspector (Inspector)
New member
Username: Inspector

Post Number: 1
Registered: 07-2014
Posted on Friday, July 04, 2014 - 08:06 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am a home inspector in PA where I run into a slate roof on occasion. I understand the lengthy service life of a slate roof and know they, in most cases can be repaired. I have attached a few photos of conditions I see most often. What I would appreciate is a good general narrative when I see a slate roof that is overall, in good condition but is missing several shingles, has deteriorated flashings, or has been hit with some sort of tar rather than properly reflashed or repaired. At what point should a slate roofing contractor be recommended? Is it a good idea for simply a few missing shingles? Any advice would be greatly appreciated by one who admittedly, knows very little about slate roofs. This site is an awesome resource and I will learn a lot, but have a report to submit today and need some quick advice.
Thanks!

Broken shingles

Broken/missing shingles

Repair with tar

Flashing repair with tar

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