Slate identification help Log Out | Topics | Search
Moderators | Register | Edit Profile

Slate Roof Central Message Board » Slate Roofs » Slate identification help « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Blue_sky_roofing (Blue_sky_roofing)
Senior Member
Username: Blue_sky_roofing

Post Number: 65
Registered: 05-2010
Posted on Saturday, December 28, 2013 - 03:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

TruSlate by GAF? Onyx black?

TruSlate have the nail holes at the top as they require underlayment every row. - Slate applied like wood shakes. What a shame!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John_chan (John_chan)
Senior Member
Username: John_chan

Post Number: 139
Registered: 08-2006
Posted on Wednesday, December 18, 2013 - 12:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That's the problem with most Chinese and Brazilian slate we see here in the US. Some of it punches and cuts fine, but usually the majority can't be cut or punched. It needs to be sawn or drilled or it'll fall apart!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 1040
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Tuesday, December 17, 2013 - 04:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Kinda what I thought. It looks from the punching that they are hard as billy hell and that would not be a good thing.When you swing that hard and it blows the back of the slate out, I see nothing but problems. good luck!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Tdensley (Tdensley)
New member
Username: Tdensley

Post Number: 3
Registered: 12-2013
Posted on Tuesday, December 17, 2013 - 02:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Just an update on these slates. I'm going to pass on them. I found a local slater here in my town and he was nice enough to let me into his shop and we gave these samples a good work over and I was able to compare them to 'known' Vermont non-fading blacks. The workability is staggeringly different! The sample slates that I had are extremely brittle compared to the Vermonts and the workability is very inconsistent. Yes they are punchable and able to be cut, but more often than not upon punching and cutting with the slate hammer the slate would just shatter in hand, appearing to break along veins. So, indeed, they are drilled for a reason! Bad slates! Still don't know where they came from though.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Tdensley (Tdensley)
New member
Username: Tdensley

Post Number: 2
Registered: 12-2013
Posted on Tuesday, December 17, 2013 - 08:39 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The slate punches and cuts just fine. Here are some more pictures of just doing a swift test on one of the slates, and they ring very true with a sharp crisp 'ting' and the note sustains for about 4 seconds.







Does freshly cut slate have an odor? I notice a slight urea smell after I have cut into this slate. This could easily be from where these slates are currently stored outdoors and the felines have been marking them.

Does anyone know why the manufacturer drilled the holes so high up on these slates? What application would that serve?

And the bottom line is would you install these on a roof and expect 80+ years out of them?

I realize that to really make an informed judgement you guys would have to have a piece 'in hand' to really form an accurate opinion, and I empathize with this big time because in my own profession everything is guilty until proven innocent.

In just the 9 short years that we have been in our house I have personal seen 3 of my immediate neighbors slate roofs come off and be re-roofed with asphalt. It kills me to see this! And I would really love to take care of what I can take care of, which is our own property, and when those asphalt shingles fail in 10 years or less. maybe the neighbors will consider putting the slates back up!

Thanks again for all of your time!

(Message edited by Tdensley on December 17, 2013)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John_chan (John_chan)
Senior Member
Username: John_chan

Post Number: 138
Registered: 08-2006
Posted on Monday, December 16, 2013 - 11:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Judging from the edges and the drilled nail holes and color, it looks like a Brazilian slate to me. It's very similar to a slate that was installed on an Olive Garden in the panhandle of Florida that I did a roof inspection on a couple of years ago. However, I'd have to see it in person first. There are a couple of other slates that are similar to this. Try punching the slate with a slate hammer, and try cutting it with a slate cutter. Chances are high that the slate won't cut or punch. It most likely needs to be drilled and sawn.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 1039
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Monday, December 16, 2013 - 10:21 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Metric, drilled and only 1/4 inch thick. They look like Chinese to me. That is not necessarily bad or good however. How do they cut? do they ring nice?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Tdensley (Tdensley)
New member
Username: Tdensley

Post Number: 1
Registered: 12-2013
Posted on Monday, December 16, 2013 - 11:28 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dear all,

I'm new hear and I'm seeking out the expert slate identifiers amongst you all. I have the opportunity to get my hands on 32 squares (enough to do my home) of new slates. The seller is of no help whatsoever in being able to provide me with the source of the slates, so I will provide as much information as possible in this venue to aid in the identification. The color is a very dark grey (almost black) with a hint of blue. The texture is very smooth and when viewed from an angle in the sunlight has very fine silver sparkles scattered throughout and occasionally there might be a cluster of gold (indicating pyrite) in a slate, but these are very infrequent. These slates nominally measure 10 x 16 (actual is 9 3/4 x 15 3/4) and metrically measure exactly 25cm x 40cm. I point out the metric dimensions because it appears as if that metric measurements were used by the manufacturer when these slates were produced. The nail holes on these slates are drilled (not punched), and the location of the holes are oddly close to the head of the slate. Approximately 2 inch down from the head and 2 inch in from the side, or 5 cm exactly, again indicating that the metric scale was used in production. I point out the high placement of the holes because this might be a helpful identifier to some of you. The thickness of these are between 3/16 -5/16. I would have to re-punch all the nail holes in all of these if I were to use them, which is a lot of added work, but not a deal killer. I have the chance to get these for a very good price which will make all the difference in the world whether or not we put a slate roof on in the spring or not. I am a highly skilled tradesmen who works with his hands for a professional living (albeit not a Slater) and I will be doing this job myself with my hand-picked skilled help. I can send a sample of this slate to someone who might be able to help with a positive identification, in the meantime I will (hopefully) post pictures. Also I'm located in Rhode Island as are these slates. I hope that I didn't mislead anyone by over stressing the metric measurements and possibly leading you to believe that I was located out side of the US. However, maybe the metric dimensions are significant and will help one of you pin point where these slates came from.
Many thanks in advance!








Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Program Credits Administration