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Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 1021
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Monday, October 07, 2013 - 05:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

LV Velux also has copper clad skylights, so that is not a problem. A very good flashing system indeed!
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Lv_pa (Lv_pa)
Senior Member
Username: Lv_pa

Post Number: 55
Registered: 05-2007
Posted on Sunday, October 06, 2013 - 04:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I assume the frames of the Velux skylights are painted aluminum? If you're making your own copper flashings, is there any concern about a bad interaction between the aluminum and copper? Just the other day, I noticed a bit of corrosion on my copper ridge where it had come into contact with some temporary painted aluminum flashing I was using.
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Joe (Joe)
Moderator
Username: Joe

Post Number: 805
Registered: 07-2006


Posted on Tuesday, September 03, 2013 - 11:22 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hey Milo,
That's a great idea. I hadn't even thought of video taping the skylight replacement process, but I can see how it would make a good educational video. I'm replacing 8 more skylights, so I'll have ample opportunity to film it.
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Milo (Milo)
Junior Member
Username: Milo

Post Number: 19
Registered: 05-2009
Posted on Friday, August 30, 2013 - 04:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Joe,
Would you be able to do a little write up article on the site or post a short video of you installing the skylights (especially flashing with the 20 oz copper) ? I know that you're a pretty busy guy but your other videos/articles have been pure gold when dealing with subjects such as this.

Thanks,
MILO
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Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 1013
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Tuesday, August 27, 2013 - 09:27 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

What Joe said!
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Joe (Joe)
Moderator
Username: Joe

Post Number: 803
Registered: 07-2006


Posted on Monday, August 26, 2013 - 08:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

As the author of the Slate Roof Bible I can say that the skylight design in the first edition should not be used. They only lasted me about 30 years until the copper wore out and the system was not designed to be replaceable. I am now replacing all of those skylights (10 of them) with Velux curb mount skylights. I like the 2X6 curb mount because I can make my own 20 ounce copper soldered flashings and both the flashings and skylights are easily replacable down the road if ever need be. I have two Velux skylights on my house and they have worked well. They open. The curb mount ones I am now installing are fixed. The two skylights that open have aluminum flashings that I made myself (I did not buy the flashings that Velux sells). But this time I'm soldering 20 ounce copper. Should last the rest of my life.
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Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 1011
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Friday, August 23, 2013 - 09:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Let's put it this way. I have two of the opening Velux windows in my roof that have been there since 1978, and they are still good. If you do have problems, they will fix them. It is a good company!
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Lv_pa (Lv_pa)
Senior Member
Username: Lv_pa

Post Number: 54
Registered: 05-2007
Posted on Thursday, August 22, 2013 - 01:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks, Old_school. I went to check out a Velux skylight at ABC yesterday and will be thinking about this some more. Still curious if anyone has experience with repairing/replacing these.
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Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 1010
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Tuesday, August 20, 2013 - 07:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Lv. Good to hear from you. It has been a while. Go to ABC supply or Lowes and get a Velux skylight. they are not the most expensive, but they are the best. They have a flashing system that is second to none and they are designed by professionals for professionals, but they are also user friendly. They come in different sizes, they can be installed with channels so that the light is in a shaft or you can just install them in the attic to let the light in. Another option if you just want to let in natural light is to get one of their "sun-tubes" they have a round dome and a straight or flexible shaft that goes down to a panel on the ceiling below. It lets in a lot of light and they are easy to flash. Just like a pipe flashing. If you have any questions, you can email me and I can answer specific ones. Old School John r. Crookston
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Lv_pa (Lv_pa)
Senior Member
Username: Lv_pa

Post Number: 53
Registered: 05-2007
Posted on Monday, August 19, 2013 - 07:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi again everyone. I'm thinking about putting skylights in my roof and trying to figure out the best plan.

I read the part in the Slate Roof Bible that suggests home-made skylights using safety glass. But I don't really understand the flashings around the edges and don't have confidence in my ability to make this arrangement leak-proof.

I also thought of using overlapped clear plastic sheets to substitute for slates in the appropriate places. That is, I would cut one sheet to the size of three slates side by side, and substitute it for the slates in one row, then above it and centered on it, I would overlap a two-slate sized piece, then above that another three-slate sized piece, and so on. This way no flashings would be necessary. (The roof deck is 1"x2" laths (skip-sheathing) so you would be able to see through it.) I made a cardboard mock-up of this idea and I think it would work.

The question is what material to use here. I had been using 1/16" thick clear polycarbonate sheets as temporary roofing in some areas, but I noticed that after a while this material tends to crack around the fastener holes. I talked to the rep and he suggested a few remedies-- using 1/8" thick sheets instead, oversizing the holes to allow for movement, etc. But even then the plastic is vulnerable to UV and is only guaranteed for 10 years.

That leaves commercial skylights as an option, and again I'm worried about longevity. Some manufacturers say the glass is guaranteed for 20 years, but I don't know if that covers the rubber seals or what. Does anyone know how long skylights usually last and what is usually the first thing to fail? Are they repairable or do you have to replace them when they wear out?

Thanks,
Lv_pa

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