Closed/open valley flashing Log Out | Topics | Search
Moderators | Register | Edit Profile

Slate Roof Central Message Board » Slate Roofs » Closed/open valley flashing « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 947
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Wednesday, January 16, 2013 - 12:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dennis, good to hear from you. If you use the 20 oz. it will last longer. Longer than we will be alive anyway. Did you decide to join us? John
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Joe (Joe)
Moderator
Username: Joe

Post Number: 758
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Wednesday, January 16, 2013 - 11:57 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That's how we do it (as the photo shows). We use 16" X 16" 20 ounce copper, turned as shown. Have done it for decades like that. Learned the technique from removing and replacing old closed valley flashings. Eventually it will get pitted and leak.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Dennis_m_crookshanks (Dennis_m_crookshanks)
New member
Username: Dennis_m_crookshanks

Post Number: 6
Registered: 09-2009
Posted on Wednesday, January 16, 2013 - 09:23 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You don't get much valley coverage installing the flashing like that. Better to turn the squares parallel to the valley line, or better yet, use a chevron pattern to match the slate line. Should not be a problem with that steep of pitch though.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 946
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Sunday, January 13, 2013 - 12:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Perfect! Very well done. I hope it makes sense now!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Spp (Spp)
Member
Username: Spp

Post Number: 21
Registered: 09-2008
Posted on Sunday, January 13, 2013 - 09:53 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

As a follow up -- I forgot I had taken this:

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Spp (Spp)
Junior Member
Username: Spp

Post Number: 20
Registered: 09-2008
Posted on Wednesday, November 21, 2012 - 12:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks for the explanation. I could be off on the size of the copper squares -- it was a guesstimate. Yes, they were installed one course at a time along with the slate on both sides (I didn't do the work -- I'm just the guy who pays to have it done). :)

Thanks again for the reply. I have been meaning to ask about this for a while now and kept forgetting.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 921
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Wednesday, November 21, 2012 - 11:56 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

SPP Normally they would be larger than that, maybe 16 inches square. They are inserted while you ar going up the valley and you do both sides at once. You could call it a "step valley" similar to the step flashings that you install as you go up a vertical wall. The "reason" you do it this way is because the water will shed off the metal and onto the slate below, and never have a chance to run sideways and get beneath the valley metal. The water never has a chance to "buildup' before it is out of the slates and onto the surface.

DON'T jamb the slates tight together in the valley or against the wall when using step flashings. Let the space (maybe 1/4 to 1/2 an inch) allow the water to flow away without damming up.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Spp (Spp)
Junior Member
Username: Spp

Post Number: 19
Registered: 09-2008
Posted on Wednesday, November 21, 2012 - 11:37 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is there a difference on how a closed valley is flashed versus an open one? Most open/exposed valleys that I see use a single sheet of metal with the slate covering the outer few inches of the metal. When we had a closed valley reflashed recently it was done using small (say 6-8") overlapping squares of copper laid on top of one another along the valley and then slated over.

Is there a reason for using this technique in the closed valley as opposed to the single long sheet of copper that I normally see?

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Program Credits Administration