Ladder hooks on Mansard roof? Log Out | Topics | Search
Moderators | Register | Edit Profile

Slate Roof Central Message Board » Slate Roofs » Ladder hooks on Mansard roof? « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Anonymous
Posted on Thursday, March 16, 2006 - 10:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

What is the best way to work on a Mansard roof? Are you able to use hook ladders on these roofs?

my roof

Thanks!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Anonymous
Posted on Friday, March 17, 2006 - 07:38 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We use 5/8" rope secured at ridge with asphulndt sadle. Or we would remove a couple slates install roof bracket(s) and set a lite alum. ladder in seat of roof bracket and tie it, to it.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Walter Musson
Posted on Friday, March 17, 2006 - 08:27 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The picture you have used appears to be a steep hipped roof with valleys,not a Mansard roof.
Looks like peak ladders would work on this roof in a lot of places.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Anonymous
Posted on Friday, March 17, 2006 - 09:30 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Walter - the top of the roof is almost flat and is covered in copper which led me to believe it was a Mansard style roof.

The only places that have traditional peaks/ridges are along the top of the dormers, along the front there's a ridge on the one section, and the section of roof that is seen to the far left with the single dormer. The main section of the roof in the center with 2 dormers is near flat on top and covered in a large section of copper - it's like 5-6' wide and perhaps 15-20' long.

Because of all of the angles and with it being so steep, I didn't realize the top was almost flat until I got up on a ladder to inspect the chimney. I didn't have my camera on me at the time or I would have shot a photo.

Here's a cropped section of the roof that I am referring to - this is covered with an almost flat section of green copper but is near impossible to see from the ground:

mansard
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Joe Jenkins
Posted on Friday, March 17, 2006 - 10:02 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You can't use hook ladders on the part of the roof where the top is flat, but you can use them where there are horizontal ridges. Where the top is flat, we use roof jacks and planks, although this roof is so steep you may be able to just lean a ladder against the roof.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Anonymous
Posted on Friday, March 17, 2006 - 12:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

In the first picture it appears (the eve of roof) to only be about 8' off the ground I would also try to use a 36' or 40' ladder and extend it up the roof in areas where to be accessed. Kick the bottom out a little, but with how the picture shows it, it really won't be kicked out much more than standard. EASY, QUICK AND SIMPLE. Or do what I mentioned earlier. Have someone butt the bottom of ladder or tie it to something secure. We usually always have a 80# bag of mortar mix with us and butt the ladder with that. Cheaper than paying someone to stand there. You only need to worry about this on driveways or sidewalks. It should be alright in the lawn areas. A bag of mortar will cost no more than 5-10bucks. And if any pointing is needed you have it!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Anonymous
Posted on Friday, March 17, 2006 - 08:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks for the input everyone. I kinda figured I might be able to prop a ladder right up against the roof since it is soo steep and get away with it. Better to ask than to screw something up. :)

What's the concensus with the roof? Mansard or not? It's probably a combination of several styles and not true to any "one" in particular...??

Thanks again!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

mjh
Posted on Saturday, March 18, 2006 - 12:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Well! It's not what I would call a Mansard. The top must be realy flat, it looks like a steep pitched roof with a low pitched or flat top. As for repairing it, lean a ladder against the roof and have somebody holding it at the bottem, a bag of morter mix wont stop a ladder from slipping sideways.

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Program Credits Administration