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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Wednesday, January 24, 2007 - 05:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Dave,

A cant is necessary. Have you read the article on starter slates in the last Traditional Roofing Magazine (http://www.traditionalroofing.com/TR5_starters.html)?

The height of the cant depends on the thickness of the slate. For standard 3/16" to 1/4" slate, you will need about 3/8" cant.

Metal drip edge is not necessary on slate roofs. You can use a wooden cant, cedar siding, for example, ripped to the correct thickness, or just a wood strip. We typically rip a 1" hemlock board into half inch strips and use those for cant strips. The 1" hemlock is convenient because that's what we typically use for roof decking. You can also use plaster lath, among other things, as a cant.

Regarding copper cants, some people prefer a copper edging on their new slate roofs either for stylistic purposes, or because they used plywood or other laminated roof decking and want to protect the edge of the wood. Berger doesn't sell a copper cant, but we are selling them in 8' sections (so we can UPS them) for $5.00/foot plus s&h (made of 16 ounce copper and 6" stock). It's a new product and we haven't put it on our online store yet, but we can still produce it and sell it right away. It will be on the store soon. If you want any, just call us at 814-786-9085.
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Dave Gilbert
Posted on Tuesday, January 23, 2007 - 03:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am installing a slate roof and want to get advice on how to install a copper drip edge with a cant. Is it necessary to have the cant in the drip edge or can a wooden shim be used, such as cedar shake? Do I even need a cant? How high should the cant be if its needed? If the copper drip edge has the cant, does this have to be custom created/ordered or is it available (Berger)?
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Steve T
Posted on Thursday, February 02, 2006 - 10:30 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Alot of the jobs we have been bidding have copper drip edge spec. The thing I do not like is when you put the cant strip under the drip edge you need to have almost an inch and a half face to cover the cant strip and facia board. Has any one made drip edge and bent a cant strip right in the metal?? Then If they spec drip edge on the gable ends it's a mess where they meet on the corners of the roof. The gable end lifts up on to the eve drip and looks curved. What have you other slaters done??
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Walter Musson
Posted on Thursday, February 02, 2006 - 01:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Steve,
I sometimes use a wooden shingle from the eaves cant strip along and up the rake to better smooth this transition.
I do use a copper cant strip at times-as when you have a flat membrane roof with slate on the pitched roof behind it.
I run the membrane up several feet-then install the copper cant and begin slating,leaving at least 8" to 10" of the membrane covered.
You could do the same thing over the drip edge if you choose.
Best regards,Walter
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slateworks
Posted on Sunday, February 05, 2006 - 07:06 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Steve,
Walter's method with the wood shingle works well to make a smooth transition as he described above,you also have to not drive the nails to tight that secure the drip edge at the transition area so that you do not bend or draw down the drip edge. We are installing a slate roof right now that has drip edge on 6 dormers and we are using Walter's method.
Yes you can bend a hem on the back edge of drip edge to form a type of cant to kick up your undereaver, or bend a copper cant strip to install on top of your drip edge,or bend a piece that covers your wood cant strip sort of a u shape & nail or wire in place on top of your drip edge as needed.
We have also made slate cants ,cut 3 to 6 inches wide ect.
Good Luck, Ron
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admin
Posted on Sunday, February 05, 2006 - 02:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have posted a photo of a copper drip edge with the cant on this web site at http://www.slateroofcentral.com/photos_misc.html
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admin
Posted on Monday, February 06, 2006 - 12:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

This is an attempt to post the image here on this message board: web_copper_drip_edge.jpg
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admin
Posted on Monday, February 06, 2006 - 12:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Looks like it worked. To post an image on this message board, click on "formatting" underneath the "help" topic at left, then under "formatting topics," click on "other formatting," then click on "Images, Attachments, and Clipart" and follow the directions.

The image must be a jpeg or gif and it should be small enough that it will upload easily.

Joe
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Anonymous
Posted on Monday, February 06, 2006 - 09:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We recently slated a roof and have come to the portion of the project where gutters are being considered. Does anyone have any valuable experience / suggestions to offer regarding the gutter installation? Please find a picture of what the project will require. IMG_9502.JPG IMG_9503.JPG
Thanks in advance.
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Steve T
Posted on Monday, February 06, 2006 - 10:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

To the right of the chimney it looks like there are three cut pieces with the gussets lineing up ???if so this is going to leak. can anyone else see this
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slateworks
Posted on Tuesday, February 07, 2006 - 06:35 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi, The 3 bonds in a row may be that the purple slate just looks like it could be 2pcs. instead of a full slate? or some distortion of the image.

If your rafters are going to be exposed like they are now(are they 3/4" or 1.5"wide? hard to tell from photo) you could install 1/2 round gutters with either a-- #10 fascia mounted circle(this hanger can be used if you install a new fascia board,install 12" to 18" oc depending on snow loads)--- or a #11 shank & circle that is fastened to the side of the exposed rafter end(this hanger would be the stronger of the 2,if installing on the open rafter ends))--and try to mount the gutter hangers so snow & ice will slide off of roof without damaging the gutter,lay a straight edge on the roof and adjust your hangers so the front edge is even or slightly lower than the bottom edge of the straight edge.Berger Bros.out of Philadelphia,Pa carries this type of material.
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Anonymous
Posted on Wednesday, February 08, 2006 - 01:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Can anybody tell me what the going rate per square for 16"x 8" pennsylvania slate. The roof slope is 9/12 or 10/12and is located in the state of Mn. Also what would a reasonable rate be to do a repair in this area.
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Steve T
Posted on Wednesday, February 08, 2006 - 09:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

about the copper drip with the cant strip in the pic above isn't the slate lifted to high at the end??
Also is there any other ways to do a sweep on a roof other than wood strips in between courses??How hard is it to install a slate saddle cap on a sweep with a hip??
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admin
Posted on Friday, February 10, 2006 - 11:06 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Here's a photo of a small sweep on a tower we did last year, with a "saddle cap":

web_tower2.jpg
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admin
Posted on Friday, February 10, 2006 - 11:10 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Also, the copper drip edge is not bent the way I would like to see it. I think the cant part of it should be closer to the bottom edge.

Regarding the use of wood strips under the swept eave slates, you don't need to use them at all, but if the gap is too big, the wood strips make it easier for the slating nails to reach wood.

Joe

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