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Wihomeowner (Wihomeowner)
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Username: Wihomeowner

Post Number: 3
Registered: 02-2012
Posted on Sunday, February 26, 2012 - 02:21 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks all the feedback.
In discussion with my roofer, we're going to try the asphalt/mesh on seams and other defects. More than 90% of the gutter is rusty, but not leaking, so hopefully painting with occasional patch jobs will keep it going for some more years.

In my heart, though, I think I'm looking at a total rebuild job at some point.

(Message edited by wihomeowner on February 26, 2012)
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Joe (Joe)
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Username: Joe

Post Number: 672
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Sunday, February 26, 2012 - 12:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The alternative is to patch the leaking areas with trowel grade roof cement and fiberglass mesh (the mesh is critical), then paint the entire gutter system to try to preserve it as long as possible. We have done this a lot too. It's the cheapest, quickest alternative. The only long-term solution is to replace the metal with new metal (then keep the metal painted if it's "tin").
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Joe (Joe)
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Username: Joe

Post Number: 671
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Sunday, February 26, 2012 - 12:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We would use a liquid asphalt emulsion with a fiberglass mesh backing in this situation. You paint on the emulsion, work in the fiberglass, let it dry overnight, then paint on another layer of emulsion. Then redo it every five or ten years (although you may not need to add the fiberglass layer again).

You can do the same thing with trowel grade roof cement instead of emulsion if you only need to do it once and you're going to replace the entire shebang before five years. Roof cement goes on relatively thick, whereas emulsion goes on relatively thin and can even be painted afterward.

If the existing gutter is just rusty and not leaking, however, just clean it off with a scraper and or wire brush and paint it with a coat or two of tinners red or tinners green paint.
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Frost (Frost)
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Username: Frost

Post Number: 4
Registered: 11-2011
Posted on Tuesday, February 21, 2012 - 09:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

trust me this is what you want. your looking at the directions and totally imagining your performing surgery or something...you absolutely dont want to use epdm.... this is what you want.use it don't try it either way it was great advice...

second tin metal never was tin... it was a lead tin coating on thin sheet steel... and it was essentially a hot dip process..so 65 years or being taken care of doesn't surprise me at all...

ive coated terne valleys that years later are still rust free and looking great)terne which you call "tin" is just something people called tin like the tin coating on a steel can to keep from poisoning people.

the most important thing is do a nice clean prep job and wipe it off with a little acetone and start applying using the fleece...inexpensive and just (functionally)as good as copper well maybe not as long lasting but very cheap in comparison. and 20 years or better life with likely no maintenance..
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Wihomeowner (Wihomeowner)
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Username: Wihomeowner

Post Number: 2
Registered: 02-2012
Posted on Tuesday, February 21, 2012 - 09:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I've never heard of this product before, here's the prep guidelines from their website:

G. Steel/Metal:
1. Clean and prepare metal surfaces to near white metal in accordance with SSPC - SP3 (power tool clean) or as required by membrane manufacturer. Extend preparation a minimum of one (1) inch beyond the termination of the membrane flashing materials.
2. In addition to cleaning, all metal surfaces shall be abraded to provide a rough open surface. A wire brush finish is not acceptable.

I don't think this is reasonable.

BTW, is it easy to distinguish tin from galvanized steel? Different people seem to think the gutters are lined by either material. It would seem surprising to me that 65+ year galv. steel wouldn't have rusted through.
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Frost (Frost)
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Username: Frost

Post Number: 2
Registered: 11-2011
Posted on Tuesday, February 21, 2012 - 09:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

you don't want to do any of those things to those gutters/ trough gutters/built ins..

you want a resin with a fleece backing i suggest kemper 210 or 2k if i'm wrong i'll never post here again.... trust me this is what you want....
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Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 789
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Saturday, February 18, 2012 - 06:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If you can make the patching and paint work, go for it. The EPDM would be more expensive, but it would do the job. You are going to have to pull up the shingles to get it under them though. You MAY be able to just line the gutters with the EPDM and then insert a piece of drip edge over the rubber and beneath the shingles to do the job for a while. Where the gutters abut the flat roof, you can strip it in with cover tape. It may work for a period of years and it would certainly be cheaper than lining it with copper. It appears to have decent pitch and that is a good thing.
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Wihomeowner (Wihomeowner)
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Username: Wihomeowner

Post Number: 1
Registered: 02-2012
Posted on Saturday, February 18, 2012 - 05:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

First post-don't be to harsh(especially since I don't have a slate roof) ;)

I have built in gutters on my mid 1950s house. The gutters are original to the house and are made from tin with soldered seams. As you can see in the pictures they've been painted several times before but have now started to deteroriate and are leaking in several area, with resulting soffit damage and rotting.

I've gotten several evaluations from roofing contractors, but I'm not sure which is the best method of repair.
1. Replace entire gutter system with new built in gutters in copper. I have approximately 280' of gutter, I think this option is cost prohibitive (at least $40,000).
2. Line the gutters with 060 EPDM.
3. Patch the leaking spots/seams with asphalt and use Rust-Oleum like paint over the rest. I think that this might work, but for how long?

I would appreciate any help or feedback on my gutters.


flat roof

flat roof

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