Contractor Repairs? Log Out | Topics | Search
Moderators | Register | Edit Profile

Slate Roof Central Message Board » Slate Roofs » Contractor Repairs? « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Anonymous
Posted on Tuesday, October 23, 2001 - 03:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am going through a situation with a slate roofing contractor who claims to have completed work we discussed on my 74 year old house. He alleges that he "replaced" approximately 60 slates in two areas; a valley and a shed roof over the dormer. Upon my inspection (he doesn't know I have been on the roof and have photographs) it appears that a few slates have been repaired as I can see new copper flashing installed as per the Slate Roof Bible. However, as far as I can determine, there are only a few (6 or so) new slates and it looks as though the old slates were reused. I have no problem with the recycling of the slates as the color and style matches, but the roofer claims to have "matched" the existing roof. However, the slates have the weathering and other evidence of being the original.

My problem is that I feel the cost he is charging is way out of line for the amount of time he spent on the job plus the fact he failed to complete most of what we discussed due to meeting our budgeted amount too soon!

I am waiting for him to make an inspection with me to show me his work before I pay him any more money, and in the back of my mind is a doubt that maybe he did replace the 60+ slates. I only see new copper in 3 or 4 places and his quality of work seems good, it's the quantity I object to.

Are there any guidelines for the cost of repairs, the rates a good roofer should be compensated at, etc.

He also failed to clean up the job site and overlooked many of the areas I was concerned about.

Many thanks for any information you can provide. I have just ordered the Slate Roof Bible for my edification and look forward to becoming more knowledgeable.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Joe Jenkins
Posted on Monday, October 29, 2001 - 01:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Unfortunately, there are no guidelines for estimating costs of slate roof repairs. I have seen porposals vary 300% for the same work by different contractors. Valley replacement, for example, can cost anywhere from $30 per running foot to $200, mostly depending on the contractor. Specs will vary the price as well (height, material, width of the metal, steepness, etc.). I generally charge $30 per foot to replace valleys with 20 ounce copper and sometimes as high as $50 if the valley is all tarred up. On institutions it goes up even farther in price. Most slate roofers I know charge a *lot* more than I do, but they take a *lot* longer to do the work and may or may not do it right.

Slate replacement will cost you anywhere from $10 to $30 per slate, labor and materials. However, the slates replaced in the valleys during valley replacement are usually included in the valley costs and are not added to the overall price.

The best approach to this problem is to get more than one proposal for any slate roof repair job, and then take a close look at the details before hiring anyone. For example, $40 per foot for a 20 ounce copper valley is *much* better than $30 per foot for a terne coated steel valley. Also, get references and ask to see the prospective contractor's completed jobs *before* hiring them, *unless* they already come highly recommended from a trustworthy source.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jim Bennette
Posted on Thursday, November 29, 2001 - 01:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You need a big raise. a slate roofer is professional that needs to be paid as one. those prices are way to low to do a good job no matter how fast the guys are.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

c. melendez
Posted on Monday, October 28, 2002 - 01:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hello. I am currently looking for an experienced slate roofer in long island (NY). I recently received a quote for the repairs which entails replacing about 45 slates and replacing the flashings by the chimney. On his quote sheet, the roofer gave a price for sealing the ridges and sail pipe sleeves. When I inquired what type of sealant, he answered with tar. After navigating the jenkins website, I noticed that this may be inappropriate. I reinspected the roof and I did notice that there is tar around the sail pipe sleeves and on the ridges. Is this correct?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

SlateGuy@neslate.com
Posted on Monday, October 28, 2002 - 05:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hello,

Definitely inappropriate. The Slate Roofing Pros and/or The Slate Roof Bible can tell you why in more detail.

PS: Keep that guy off your roof. Check out the Slate Roofing Contractor listings at:

http://jenkinsslate.com/directory.html

And/or call The New England Slate Co at 888-NESLATE and the folks in the office can give you a few names.

Best,
SlateGuy@neslate.com
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Aaron Ruby
Posted on Tuesday, June 10, 2003 - 09:22 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm not sure this is the right message board to post this question, but I am just guessing. Typically, what can an owner expect to be a reasonable warranty from a roofing contractor for a slate roof? I am asking the question really for those roofing contractors that specialize in slate--not the run-of-the-mill type. Surely, more than 1 year can be expected? After all, won't it take several years for incorrectly installed tiles to begin to loosen and fall out? Thanks
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

admin
Posted on Tuesday, June 10, 2003 - 11:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That's a good question. We (Jenkins) will repair anything that goes wrong with an installation we do, indefinitely. That's because a proper slate installation should not have any problems for many, many decades. We don't put a time limit on it. On the other hand, a five year warranty would probably be reasonable. Anything that will go wrong due to poor workmanship should show up within five years. That's not always the case, however. The people who walk all over the slate during installation will crack many of them and they may not fall apart for ten years. I have seen it myself. Of course, ten years later the contractors are long gone and can't be found.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

c. melendez
Posted on Tuesday, March 29, 2005 - 01:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi, I have a slate roof with a combination of pennslyvania (90%) and vermont slate (10%). within the last couple of years I have had a slate contractor replace some valleys, and slate. I have still noticed a leak last night. I even went to the attic and saw where there was dripping. I could not determine the exact area of leakage due to insulation. My question is what is the best way to pinpoint the area. My second question is how feasible is to start a slate roof replacement by section ($$ is the limiting factor)lets say one section per 6-12 months. thank you
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Joe Jenkins
Posted on Saturday, April 02, 2005 - 10:15 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Mark where you saw the water coming inside. The roofer shold be able to trace it back from there.

Reslating in sections over time is quite feasible in most situations.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Anonymous
Posted on Wednesday, June 29, 2005 - 04:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have a close friend that needs to have a slate roof removed from a 90-100 year old home the slate looks great, but the house has been referbished and the owner needs to replace the roofing is there any worth to the old slate shingles? Thank you for your time.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Anonymous
Posted on Wednesday, June 29, 2005 - 05:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If the slate looks great then why does he/she want to get rid of the slate roof? Does he/she know that they now have the greatest roof known to man. And that any repairs it may need will cost thousands less than a new roof that will have to be replaced sooner than later. If the slate is in the shape you say and it is that age it still has more life left in it than any other replacement roof they could get. But, to answer your question is there any worth to the slate yes both as a salvage stand point and I believe it is worth more where it is to the owners. People are saving and trying their best to be able to afford a slate roof on their homes (because they know it's the #1 roofing product) and here you have people wanting to get rid of a slate roof because the house has been refurbished? Nothing will EVER LOOK BETTER ON THAT HOUSE THAN SLATE. If they are your friends help them out and to understand what they have this site along with the slate roof bible has alot of reading to help people understand slate roofs and there true value. First they are architectually the best looking, they are the longest lasting, they are environmental friendly, they are fire proof, they resists climatic changes and to boot they are the most historic NATURAL roof known to man. Show me a over the counter roof that can add up! You can't and won't be able too. They even make fake slate roof (they are junk) how many fake shingle (asphalt) roofs are they making to copy asphalt shingles--NONE. Get some professional advice before you just tear off a good slate roof. This site provides a State by State contractor directory, have a professional look at it and see how much life is left and the cost of repairs then make your decision as to the fate of the slate roof. You may be happy with the out come. Oh yea a slate roof is much more valuable in terms of the homes resale value. STSR's

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Program Credits Administration