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Anonymous
Posted on Tuesday, September 20, 2005 - 07:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi. I need to buy a plank to go on my slater's roof brackets which I have never used. I am a big heavy guy. Do I buy an oak board at the lumberyard or something else? What length, width, and depth do I need? Any feedback is appreciated. Thanks.
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Anonymous
Posted on Tuesday, September 20, 2005 - 09:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I bought 26' x 10"x2" mixed hardwood plank which were all oak at a local lumber co. I cut the planking in thirds. Fortunately the plank were still green, and I was able to cut them in thirds easily. You might want to also check out a local saw mill. I then went to Home Depot and bought roof truss fasteners, which look like a small metal plate with oblong holes punched through so that the protrusions on the backside act as nails, and I pounded the fasteners on each end~both sides~ to stop the oak from checking i.e. cracking and splitting.

Even a good 2"x10"x10' Doug fir will work well too.

Good luck.
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admin
Posted on Tuesday, September 20, 2005 - 10:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The best planks are "micro-lam" or similar product - 2x10, either 8' or 10' long (or 4' long if you're just climbing up on the roof by yourself). You can sometimes get a good deal on these planks via scaffold companies. Otherwise, at a standard lumberyard, they tend to be expensive (a 2x10x10 may be $50). But they're worth it. They're strong as hell and not as heavy as oak.
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Anonymous
Posted on Wednesday, September 21, 2005 - 07:51 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thank you very much!!!

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