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Joe (Joe)
Moderator
Username: Joe

Post Number: 628
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Sunday, August 07, 2011 - 01:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

There is a variety of retrofit snow guards at SnowGuardWarehouse.com.

http://josephjenkins.com/store/snow-guards/

Berger, Gough and Mullane all have retrofit models: http://josephjenkins.com/store/slate_roof_snowguards/
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Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 675
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Monday, August 01, 2011 - 06:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Snow guards are good, but after the fact, you almost have to use the Zaleski's and their funny looking pitchfork tool to install them. they work, but they are expensive too...I believe about $20.00 each and you would need quite a few to make a difference on that one. You still have to install them too. How about something to deflect the snow into the gutters?
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Jamesriverarchitectscom (Jamesriverarchitectscom)
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Username: Jamesriverarchitectscom

Post Number: 6
Registered: 07-2011
Posted on Monday, August 01, 2011 - 03:34 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

oh, also- there is no real pattern that I could discern in the breakage- it does seem to be fairly random throughout- with the concentration at the one chimney that I pointed out.

Also, what are your collective thoughts on snow guards?

Thanks
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Jamesriverarchitectscom (Jamesriverarchitectscom)
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Username: Jamesriverarchitectscom

Post Number: 5
Registered: 07-2011
Posted on Monday, August 01, 2011 - 03:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks,

Joe, I agree with you- it seems crazy to rip it all off because of broken slates.

Old School- there is a leak in the vicinity of a valley- but it may be flashing at the chimney- it is hard to get at to pinpoint. It is a leak, potentially in the valley. I wondered about slates being nailed too tight and cracking them, but they are not slipping out whole, but cracking at the next course. That makes me wonder if Bigfoot was the foreman.

Chris, it is a nice looking roof. I don't know if it is the original pattern reproduced. There probably is a historic photo or two to be found.

Again, thank-you all for your observations and opinions!
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Joe (Joe)
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Username: Joe

Post Number: 626
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Saturday, July 30, 2011 - 02:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Just repair the broken slates.
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Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 671
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Saturday, July 30, 2011 - 06:52 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Address a "Potential" leak in a valley? Is it leaking or not? Does the contractor want to take off all of the slates and redo them or just in one area? I see the round vent dormer on the first picture so I know there is some ventilation in the building, and you mentioned it was a historic building and then foam insulation in the same sentence. It sounds like they fixed the building up and have caused their own problems.

It looks like whoever did the slating knew what they were doing as it is straight, so they struck lines anyway. I have no way of knowing what type of headlap they used, but at 12/12 that should not be a huge problem. Have they taken out the old broken slates and fixed them and then still had continual problems with them coming out with the snow and ice? It looks like perhaps they were nailed too tight and are stressed. That would not be good, because they will only show up when the snow and ice adds additional stress and makes them let go. Does this occur only at the bottom where the ice builds up? Perhaps this is the area you would have to address and leave the rest of the roof alone. Just a thought, as we don't have enough information. good luck!
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Chris (Chris)
Senior Member
Username: Chris

Post Number: 111
Registered: 09-2009
Posted on Friday, July 29, 2011 - 02:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

very pretty slate design, i like it alot.
was that the original pattern?
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Jamesriverarchitectscom (Jamesriverarchitectscom)
New member
Username: Jamesriverarchitectscom

Post Number: 4
Registered: 07-2011
Posted on Friday, July 29, 2011 - 12:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Here is another image that I took from the very top- the widow's walk. Standing up there feels like it should be renamed the "widow maker".

This was a cold early March snow after a warm spell that got rid of all the other accumulation. Very interesting to note the melting snow up higher where the uninsulated attic roof is warm, and the remaining snow on the cold slates that have foam insulation at knee walls and cathedral ceilings- such as the spire. Snow begins to dam up in gutters, eyebrow windows and valleys, resetting the trap.
snow on roof- note melting snow above insulated knee walls
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Jamesriverarchitectscom (Jamesriverarchitectscom)
New member
Username: Jamesriverarchitectscom

Post Number: 3
Registered: 07-2011
Posted on Friday, July 29, 2011 - 12:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am consulting for a home owner who has a great historic house with a 7 year old replacement slate roof. The initial call was out of concerns of falling slates, it is a 12 on 12 roof, quite high with roll asphalt on porches below and entrance ways where people tend to come and go- stakes are high if someone gets hit. Most slates come down with big floes of ice and snow- as ice damming is a problem, and no snow guards.

Broken slates are random, and relatively light- let's say about .05% to sound scientific. There are some higher incidences around a chimney- which could reflect more abuse during flashing work, or perhaps it taking more of a pounding when ice lets go.

One contractor said he would take all the slates down so he can address a potential leak in a valley and replace broken slates, and install snow guards directly to boards. I think this is overboard. But that would give us the advantage of ripping off the damn ice and water shield put everywhere.

Any suggestions? I am going to post a few photos...
broken slate in gutter
broken slate
missing slates

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