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Old_school (Old_school)
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Username: Old_school

Post Number: 670
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Wednesday, July 27, 2011 - 05:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I based that on 12 feet of length and 1 1/2 squares of roof total. That should give you 12 1/2 feet of rafters total and half of that would be 75 inches. Hang the bottom out 2 inches and run the spacing at 4 3/8" and you should be about right at the top. With the 9 inch ridge your spacing should be perfect; but that is without measuring anything up. Have fun with it and send pictures.
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Gudor (Gudor)
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Username: Gudor

Post Number: 3
Registered: 07-2011
Posted on Wednesday, July 27, 2011 - 12:14 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Old School...sounds like you already figured out my probably exposure at 4 3/8" - I will double check once I get going (for spacing) but i now know what to shoot for. I appreciate the help.
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Old_school (Old_school)
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Username: Old_school

Post Number: 668
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2011 - 06:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Gudor, The pitch of your roof is marginal for slate, and the increase in the headlap will ensure that it works as it should. On a very steep roof, you could use less headlap without any bad consequences, but you want to shorten it up on the lower pitches. You will have plenty of slates to do what you want to do with about 150 left over so the shortened coursing will not be a problem in the long or short run. With a 2 inch overhang at the bottom, you should have about 18 rows of slate with a 4 3/8 inch exposure, and that should work well at the top for the ridge too. Enjoy!
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Gudor (Gudor)
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Username: Gudor

Post Number: 2
Registered: 07-2011
Posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2011 - 03:02 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Old School...thank you so much for the reply. I will definitely not cheat the headlap, however, you said make it maybe 4 1/4". Can you please explain? I figured a 3" headlap, on a 12" tile, will give me 4 1/2" exposure.

I will probably do the 9" tile for ridge, thank you. And I will definitely take what you said about proper spacing so my last row is 'full.'

Thanks again and I will get some pictures up - might be a while as I have to roof my grandmother's house(composite) first. It will be a big job - 40 squares currently with cedar. I will be looking forward to my 1 1/2 squares of slate waiting for me at home...
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Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 666
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2011 - 08:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You pretty much have it. You can punch or drill the nail holes high on the slates without any detrimental effect to the roof. The plywood while not the best surface will work, especially since you have the solid wood beneath it. The nails can go through the plywood and will seat into the solid decking.

3/16 to 1/4 spacing will not hurt anything, and like you said you can lay it out with a half and whole bond and cutting will be minimal. DON"T you dare try and 'cheat" on the headlap, that is what makes a slate roof water proof. If anything, shorten it up a bit to say 4 1/4". I would measure the rafter length and make them all the same so that you have minimal cutting for the last row of slate. As to your ridges. run them all one way, into the prevailing wind direction. A slate cut in half would work for a ridge, but you will find that a 9 inch ridge will be easier to cover with and you will be happier with that. Slate cutters are not that expensive and I would use one, but if you want to use a saw and then shape the bevel, that is ok too. worse has been done. Dab the last nails with a bit of plastic cement and then put some slate dust over them. Play with is and have fun. take a few pictures so that we can see them too. Good luck.
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Gudor (Gudor)
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Username: Gudor

Post Number: 1
Registered: 07-2011
Posted on Monday, July 25, 2011 - 01:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I picked up some 'truslate' from the local habitat for humanity outlet center. It was new, still in the original pallet, but none of the installation items were included (membrane, hooks, etc.). So all I have is the slate (635 pcs), which might be better anyhow. I have watched some of the videos from this site, and read some of the articles. I think I am pretty much ready to tackle this, but have a few issues I would like to resolve first.

Background:
* Only about 1 1/2 squares to roof (playhouse/shed)
* Exposed beam/rafter, so I will be sheathing with 1/2" cedar fencing boards (looks better from inside the building) and 3/4" CDX on top of that (I know this is not as good as solid 1" decking, but will it suffice???) I haven't put up CDX yet.
* Pitch is just under 6/12 (~5.5/12), standard gable ends
* Tiles range from 1/4" to 5/16" (maybe a few at 3/8"), all pretty uniform 12"x12"
* I am not concerned with getting a 100-year roof, I just want to get the best out of what I have without spending much more $$$.
* Live in Seattle (freezing not a real concern)

Advice on:
* Headlap - I was planning on 3" (which would give me 4.5" exposure), however, since there are no holes in the tile, could I put the holes further up the tile? Is the headlap simply for the nail holes two tiles down, or is it to cover the tile as well? Can I cheat the headlap if I place nails further up on the tile? If so, how much?
* Nail holes - kind of related to headlap question, but where should I put the holes on each tile? It sounds like I probably have a lesser quality slate (S3) as it is from truslate, so I will probably drill.
* Because each tile is nearly uniform, plus as simple a roof as possible, I shouldn't have a lot of cuts - I have a tile saw, can I cut them and 'chip' away with hammer to create the proper profile?
* Proper spacing of tiles in a row - 12' roof length, so 12 tiles wide, with 3/16" spacing should give me an inch overhang on each side. Can I place tiles 3/16" apart?
* Ridge - will 6"x12" tiles be a problem? Also, I understand how to flash/make ridge, but what is traditional in terms of finishing ridge with gable ends? Start at one end and end at other? Start at both ends and meet in middle? Either way, what does the last tile (s) look like/install like? I will have exposed nails?

Any help would be greatly appreciated, advice on things I have asked or others is welcomed.

Thank you.

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