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Anonymous
Posted on Thursday, August 18, 2005 - 11:57 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We have wooden gutters on our house with the drip edge/flashing that extends into the gutter but doesn't line it completely. My contractor told me that because the gutter is against the siding and the flashin doesn't completely line the gutter that water can get under the flashing and cause rot in the walls. It seems that this construction is pretty common so I'm not sure what to make of his assessment. If it does cause rot and problems with ice dams, would I be better off with high back copper gutters where the flashing is integral with the gutter?
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admin
Posted on Thursday, August 18, 2005 - 04:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Most slate roofs have no flashing whatsoever associated with the gutter system. Just water dripping off the slate into the gutter. No metal drip edge at all. These are century old roofs, still in good serviceable condition today.We work on them every day.

Joe Jenkins
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slateworks
Posted on Thursday, August 18, 2005 - 10:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am assuming you have no overhang? Is that what is meant by the - Gutter against the siding - If so than the drip edge you have is an important part of your gutter system this does keep water & most ice & snow from going behind the gutter,especially if the drip edge covers the back lip of gutter any where from 1.5" to whatever is needed to compensate for the slope of gutter.. Have you noticed any water damage inside or outside at the gutter area/ are the seams of gutters leaking? We have treated wood gutters with linseed oil a long time ago,You probably could seal them with a silicone waterproofer product to help them last a little longer...If you do replace them the High back gutter system you mention or Apron gutter(the gutter and roof apron are one piece) would be an excellent choice....Couple other options -line gutters with an epdm material(rubber roofing material) Or install a soft copper liner with soldered joints.
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Anonymous
Posted on Wednesday, August 24, 2005 - 12:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I should have clarified. The gutters are against not the siding but the eaves but the water seems to be backing up sometimes under the gutter apron into the eaves and into the house. My GC replaced a piece of the gutter and had pulled up the apron which does not now lie flat. I am considering that to be the real problem, not his assertion that the original design is at fault. To fix the lifted apron, can it just be screwed down to the gutter?
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admin
Posted on Wednesday, August 24, 2005 - 11:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Or riveted. Or just bent back into place.

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