Dome/curved surfaces Log Out | Topics | Search
Moderators | Register | Edit Profile

Slate Roof Central Message Board » Slate Roofs » Dome/curved surfaces « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Slate_man (Slate_man)
Senior Member
Username: Slate_man

Post Number: 445
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Wednesday, July 29, 2009 - 06:38 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

These type of roofs can be done more then one way. Joes roof picture post is done the typical way, the only that looks like migth change in the size of the slate and courses. The smaller the slate the better they will lay in the convex and concave curvse.

Jthomas yours, one is smaller and it would be easier to install that type of slate roofing on that smaller turret. Then they did the same on that other one.

OTHER WAYS OF DOING THAT IN TO HAVE HIDE COPPER FLASHING UNDER EACH COURSE
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 193
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Monday, July 27, 2009 - 09:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

JThomas, In last years Traditional roofing I wrote about how to do a cone shaped roof. The onion shaped roofs would be similiar, but you would also have to build the curved portion into the jig. If it is really curved, the only easy (sic) way to do it is with a side dutch lap like what you saw in Sarasota. They only have a slight top lap and that allows you to nail the next row on without the problem of the top head lap holding up the row above. If you read some of the stuff by Liam on this forum, I would listen to him. He is really an artist and has managed to copy some of the German techniques of slating. Very impressive!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Joe (Joe)
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 416
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Monday, July 27, 2009 - 07:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Here's a local tower that was slated in the conventional style:

Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jthomas (Jthomas)
New member
Username: Jthomas

Post Number: 1
Registered: 07-2009
Posted on Monday, July 27, 2009 - 04:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The comment on the domed roof says that it can be slated but exactly how? There seems to be a fundamental problem with using slate on a convex shape in that it cannot lap without sticking up off the roof. I was recently in Saratoga Springs where I saw two Victorian bell-roofed towers that both employeed an odd side-lap detail on the convex sloped portion. I thought this may simply be a Victorian embellishment but I also thought it may be a method to solve the problem of roofing a convex shape. I am an Architect and these are the only bell shaped roofs I have ever seen. I need to find out the method for slating this type of roof.
The attached photos are from the Saratoga Springs' houses.
share.photophoto
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

NormRice
Posted on Tuesday, September 25, 2001 - 05:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I recently purchased an 1885 Queen Anne home in Garden Grove, IA

There is a large tower in the front of the house with a dome. A previous owner put asphalt shingles on this portion of the roof.

Can slate be used on a curved surface such as a dome or would a different roofing material likely been used?

Thank you

Norm Rice
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Joe Jenkins
Posted on Wednesday, September 26, 2001 - 12:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Slate can be used.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Monty Jones
Posted on Saturday, March 23, 2002 - 10:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have a turret which is 14 feet in dia. at the drip edge, pitch is 12/12. Since I have to trim each shingle anyway, what width would be best for the first courses? The flat part of the roof uses 9X11, but I'm afraid that width would tend to break due to the curvature.

Thanks, Monty Jones
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Tim Dittmar
Posted on Sunday, March 24, 2002 - 09:12 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You're correct to be concerned but more detail could help prompt extra advice(excelling in slating in the round is very challenging). Mainstream practice of slate sizing is apparently a ratio kind of thing- 8" width goes with 12, 14, poss. 16" length- 9" w with 14, 16, maybe 18" L as a general rule(in my experience). When the exposure of your slates is figured, they don't look very shingle-like as installed(too much width)- further, more length will mean fewer courses, fewer slates, less fitting, etc. Length also aids better bedding/lying flat- trimming upper corners as needed will also help them to bed(not "bristle" so much) For best appearance(later on when aging), the turret would benefit most from being slated all with the same "batch" of slate- esp. if you intend a graduated, textured approach(means alot of cutting)- I'd recommend acquiring some 16L x 9W in the same variety as roof to start with and plan on reducing it gradually in size to 10/12L x 5/6W at top(some slates may only have room for one nail if that small/smaller). You may find it good to somewhat taper the vertical edges of your slates, etc. If you've never slated round before- consider that you "should" practice- try various ideas/sizes/techniques before executing the finished product. There's lots more to it- I'm in the NC part of directory.

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Program Credits Administration