Slate roof -- is it worth it? Log Out | Topics | Search
Moderators | Register | Edit Profile

Slate Roof Central Message Board » Slate Roofs » Slate roof -- is it worth it? « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John_chan (John_chan)
Senior Member
Username: John_chan

Post Number: 78
Registered: 08-2006
Posted on Monday, May 09, 2011 - 06:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Great analogy, Ward. I agree. There's quite a few SRCA members in NJ and Western PA to look over the roof for you.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bigmuggle (Bigmuggle)
New member
Username: Bigmuggle

Post Number: 4
Registered: 05-2011
Posted on Monday, May 09, 2011 - 09:25 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks very much for the info. I appreciate it greatly! -- Dave
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Olde_mohawk_masonry__historic_restoration (Olde_mohawk_masonry__historic_restoration)
Senior Member
Username: Olde_mohawk_masonry__historic_restoration

Post Number: 154
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Sunday, May 08, 2011 - 08:04 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

(Continuing the analogy)

Remember that Honda's aren't inexpensive, either, they also have problems when they get old, and its not inexpensive to have a foreign auto shop fix one.

There are lots of 20's to 30's era Tudors (like the one shown) in the NY-NJ-CT area, and none were built for asphalt shingles. They were built for slate, tile, and wood shingle coverings ... in other words, materials that BREATH.

READ Owens-Corning's installation directions: You MUST have ridge and soffitt ventilation (ie, modern construction) so the roof can breath. OR it must be unfinished space with NO insulation between the rafters and PLENTY of cross ventilation (ie, a cold roof.)

The houses you're looking at don't. In 10 years when the "30-year architectural shingles" turn to potato chips they will NOT honor the warranty because of installation errors. And you'll pay for a new asphalt roof with expensive flashing details because its a relatively complex roof system.

My recommendation would be to pay an SRCA member a couple hundred bucks to give you an assessment of the slate/flashing conditions so you know what you're looking at. The Vermont blend slate in the picture looks great, but we're reaching the point where original flashings MAY be at the end of their service life. You need that question answered by a qualified slater.

All things being equal, NOTHING beats the charm and aesthetic appeal of a slate roof.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bigmuggle (Bigmuggle)
New member
Username: Bigmuggle

Post Number: 3
Registered: 05-2011
Posted on Friday, May 06, 2011 - 04:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I would say more Mercedes vs. Honda. Do you spend your last penny for the Merc and hope against hope you don't have a stratospheric repair bill, or do go for the Honda, and have some money left over for whatever comes up...

I understand that slate is the Mercedes of roofs. However, if there is something faulty with it, I will be up a creek...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Joe (Joe)
Moderator
Username: Joe

Post Number: 598
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Friday, May 06, 2011 - 01:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It's like a guy looking at cars and trying to decide between a Mercedes and a Ford Pinto. Would the Mercedes be too much trouble...??
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Epl (Epl)
Senior Member
Username: Epl

Post Number: 116
Registered: 06-2009
Posted on Thursday, May 05, 2011 - 01:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

A natural slate roofing system should actually out perform nearly any other alternative roofing system (such as asphalt) in every instance. As long as the original slate roof was installed and maintained correctly, the maintenance should be somewhat minimal (or within reason for such a product). Just as with any product, proper upkeep is necessary, but the Vermont slate presently on the roof should last for 75-100 years or better. A qualified tile and slate roofing contractor in your area should be able to determine the present condition of the slates as well as the supporting materials (i.e. underlayments, flashings, decking, etc.) and report as to any recommendations or “red flags” with the roof. If possible, you will want to keep this roof as apposed to removing and replacing with something that is considerably lesser in quality.


Renaissance Tile and Slate
Roof tile and slate | Material sales and acquisition

Eric P. Loema
sales | salvage | procurement
Office: (800) 699-5695
Fax: (815) 547-1425
Cell: (815) 378-3646
Web: www.TileandSlateSales.com
Email: epl@TileandSlateSales.com
Connect: www.linkedin.com/in/eloema
Network: www.facebook.com/TileSlate
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bigmuggle (Bigmuggle)
New member
Username: Bigmuggle

Post Number: 2
Registered: 05-2011
Posted on Thursday, May 05, 2011 - 09:29 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It's in Teaneck. This is the listing:
http://www.russorealestate.com/bin/web/real_estate?ZKEY=&acnt=AR205162&action=HO ME_SEARCH&inwindow=&hs_action=VIEW_DETAIL&listing_id=REATOP49639347&start=50&grp =ALL
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Chris (Chris)
Senior Member
Username: Chris

Post Number: 98
Registered: 09-2009
Posted on Wednesday, May 04, 2011 - 08:21 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

very pretty home, what town is that?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bigmuggle (Bigmuggle)
New member
Username: Bigmuggle

Post Number: 1
Registered: 05-2011
Posted on Wednesday, May 04, 2011 - 01:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi all. Hope this is not a heretical topic to raise here. My wife and I are looking to buy a house in a neighborhood in NJ where most homes date from 1920-1940. The vast majority have asphalt roofs, but there is one that we kinda like which has a slate roof (as well as steel casement windows). I will try to attach a pic.

Here is my question: Is it worthwhile to buy a house with a slate roof? From what I have read online, they can be enormously expensive to maintain and fix, and we are already at the top of our budget for the house. I do recognize the aesthetic and historic appeal of slate, but fundamentally we just want a place to call home, that will not give us undo grief.

Will buying a house with a slate roof be asking for trouble? To put it another way: For people like us who are not handy, are not capable of doing our own roof maintenance, and are not interested in becoming historic preservationists in our spare time, would a slate roofed-house prove to be a poor decision? Thanks so much for any advice!

slate roof tudor

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Program Credits Administration