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slateworks
Posted on Thursday, April 21, 2005 - 08:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi, I cannot recall if this was in the Slate Bible or any other book I have read ,if it was I did not carry it over to actual application on the Roof,This may of been discussed before so forgive me if I am bringing up old news,While working on a Slate roof in Florida during the month of March the lead roofer showed me how to cut slate at the valley area ,I will try to explain it- Cutting the left side of the valley-Your last full slate at the bottom is 3" away from the valley line you are cutting to- pick the slate for your valley cut-turn it upside down and lay it on top of your last full slate-now slide the slate to your right until the bottom right corner touches your valley line -now mark the slate where it would lay next to your last full slate(bottom left corner)-next tilt the slate to the right until the top right corner touches the valley line,you also have to make sure your bottom mark is touching your last full slate(or where the left edge of valley slate would lay)does not matter if this mark is not all the way down to where the bottom of your last full slate is laying - next mark your slate at the top left corner where it would lay next to your last full slate - connect the 2 marks with straight edge- cut slate- turn over and install your valley slate- This may of been mentioned before ,it's just one of those things that never sunk in until now,works great,Only took 24 years-HAHA- Ater 4 weeks of work in Florida got to spend 2 weeks on vacation on Big Pine Key,first time to the Keys can't believe it took us 30 some years to go,Really enjoyed it-Very relaxing and laid back,good fishing,good food & drink.Going back next year,can't wait..Ron
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admin
Posted on Friday, April 22, 2005 - 01:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That's a technique that's new to me.

What we do is chalk the valley marking the edge of the valley exposure, they we lay the valley slate in position and mark with a nail where it intersects the chalk line (the chalk line is always drawn over with a felt-tipped pen before we start this because the chalk lines will rub off). Then we flip the slate over and cut it with a GT Pro cutter. The GT Pro cutter is designed such that you do not have to have a line on the slate - only a mark at either edge. You start cutting on one mark and keep the other lined up on the center of the cutter base. It's a pretty quick system.

Joe
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slateworks
Posted on Friday, April 22, 2005 - 05:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Joe, The method I tried to describe is quick & efficient-I do the same -Chalk your valley line & mark again with something else if chalk line rubs off-Using the above method to mark your valley slate you turn the slate over so the back side is up & proceed as described above-The slate is already marked on the back & you have less waste because you do not have to trim slate to fit into valley when you are marking the slate on the face,plus it eliminates having to turn over the slate to remark & cut it on the back - Yes the Pro Cutter works good for cutting from mark to mark and I have done that quite a bit,but I also scribe lines on the slate for valley cuts especially on a valley that is easily visible ect..The guy who showed me this method was taught by his Uncle , His Family has been in the slate & tinning business since the 30's,most of them are gone or retired. You should try it ,We used it today cutting in a closed valley. Take it easy, Ron
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admin
Posted on Saturday, April 23, 2005 - 01:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'll have to give it a try. Sounds interesting.

Joe
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Barry Smith
Posted on Tuesday, April 26, 2005 - 10:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hey Ron, I stumbled onto that method in order to cut closed valley slates sometime back, though I don't remember where. I'd love to think I figured it out myself, but I don't think that I did. It never occurred to me that it could work for open valleys but as soon as you started decribing it, I whacked myself in the head (lightly). Thanks.
So what's the deal with the Florida work. You got more of that for your old buddies?!
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slateworks
Posted on Wednesday, April 27, 2005 - 05:34 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hey Barry,A Company from Pittsburgh is working on opening another office in the Jacksonville area,they are picking up some work ,I sub work from them quite a bit. Weather was great,only missed 3 days out of 4 weeks because of rain..The pay per square in Jacksonville is lower than it is here,especially for Tile work & new construction,Old work it is somewhat open but the other bidders somewhat dictate that market price as anywhere.Area is really starting to boom though,So they are trying to stick it out to help offset the non working months up here.If they keep it going will go back next winter plus it gives us an excuse to back to the Keys for a couple of weeks. The valley cutting method does work good plus it was passed on from an old school roofing family,Conrad Wiegel is who showed it to us & his Uncle taught him ect.. Take care ,Ron
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STEVE TARAN
Posted on Wednesday, April 27, 2005 - 10:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

THAT METHOD OF CUTTING VALLEY SLATE IS IN "THE SLATE BOOK" THAT IS WRITTEN BY THE BRIAN STEARNS,ALAN STEARNS,AND JOHN MEYER THEY ARE ALL FROM ALPINE SNOW GUARDS I HAVE THE BOOKS FOR SALE FOR TWENTY BUCKS IF ANYONE WANTS ONE IT HAS ALOT OF INFO ON DESIGNING, SPECS, INSTALLATION AND REPAIR OF SLATE ROOFS. ALSO HAS A WHOLE LOT OF USEFUL CHARTS??
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micky donovan
Posted on Thursday, December 29, 2005 - 06:54 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

i have a double holing machine works like an old fashion sewing machine in and out tray holes welsh slates no problem portable
also a dimos slate cutting machine 2ftx 3ft cuts slates with a hand pull cutting wheel leaves perfect chamfered edges plus mitres i am based in uk london would be glad to share any info on cutters ect

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