Vented tile ridge Log Out | Topics | Search
Moderators | Register | Edit Profile

Slate Roof Central Message Board » Slate Roofs » Vented tile ridge « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Sniffingratty (Sniffingratty)
New member
Username: Sniffingratty

Post Number: 6
Registered: 09-2010
Posted on Tuesday, October 12, 2010 - 08:41 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks for your advice Bud, I not go with Lomanco.

I feel that I should have good ventilation for this roof, here in Syracuse we have serious ice damming problems and this is not a very steep pitched roof so I doing whatever possible to keep it cold up there.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 527
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Monday, October 11, 2010 - 08:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Branden, he had a question and he doesn't need insulting. Why the Rasty talk? Should we insult you now?

Believe it or not, the houses 100 years ago were built entirely different than they are now. Trusses, steel and fibre glas doors, double pane windows with good seather stripping, INSULATION! which was never used, Central heating AND air conditioning, indoor bathrooms and showers, running water in at least 4 different rooms, plastic vapor barriers, full basements,... All of these things CHANGE the way the house works.

Have you EVER installed slate on a plywood deck? How about wood shakes on a Plywood deck. I know that we all have to comprimise sometimes and we all have. Believe it or not, some of the things are good things. I would prefer gable vents with fans for the ventilation, or a power roof fan flashed to the slate roof, but he said it wasn't possible. He was looking for options. Geez Louise, lose the attitude!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bud (Bud)
Member
Username: Bud

Post Number: 28
Registered: 02-2010
Posted on Saturday, October 09, 2010 - 10:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Good point with the filter, I would offer that clean air is blowing out of this not dirty air into it.

I am curious to learn more about the dynamics of the tradition slate roof system as it in applied to the modern built home. With the changes in how homes are sealed, wrapped, insulated, heated, cooled and humidified I have to wonder if we really know how anything will react or what kind of life expectancy can be realized. The only way I would suppose is to do our best with the info and the materials available and wait to see.

I certainly am not trying to mix oil and water, just care to learn and to share my experience to possibly help others.

I understand how a slate roof of old would 'breathe', please tell me how a roof deck built to meet code with water proof and/or water resistant underlayments used as 'code' requires would breathe....where does the heat and condensate go if it cannot escape through a ventilation system.

Thanks for your points, I am very interested in learning more.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Branden_wilson (Branden_wilson)
Senior Member
Username: Branden_wilson

Post Number: 95
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Saturday, October 09, 2010 - 10:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

how come you gotta change your furnace filter once a month but da same stuff last 4eva in da plastik ridge mon? i shouldn't have to convince a bunch of so called slaters that there is no need for plastik on a slate roof whatsoever but btw concrete tiles are no good, there is no reason why not to just use clay. try as hard as you can to suppress the roofing contractor in you when you somehow find yourself on a slate roof. there is absolutely nothing good that modern american homebuilding can add to slate roofs. not trying to insult anyone but this site is constantly trying to mix oil and water. its our job to squash the lies that are devastating our trade not perpetuate them. we shouldn't even be discussing what type of plastik vent to use, it shouldn't even be considered.

REAL SLATER
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bud (Bud)
Member
Username: Bud

Post Number: 27
Registered: 02-2010
Posted on Saturday, October 09, 2010 - 08:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

you are citing cheap vent on a slate roof...seems odd. I suggest to you that you look closely at the specs and even closer at the end plugs, the connectors and the internal weather filter in the airvent product.

Lomanco uses a foam end plug that will deteriorate over time and blow out, Lomanco also butts together at the joints and over time and snow loading of the vent it will open allowing water in.

AirVent uses a solid rubber end plug, long lasting. Also the connection of the pieces is made with what looks to be a 'double width' plug and a cover strip. the internal weather filter serves as a back up protection to mainly ultra fine powdery snow, it also serves as a bug barrier.

Please reconsider your choice, remember to that I may not get to work on slate roofs however I do work on alot of shingle roofs. I cannot tell you how many Lomanco aluminum ridge vents that I have looked at this year because they left snow blow in and others that are leaking at the butt joints.

I trust you guys for my education on slate please trust me on my recommendations about what I have learned through making the repairs to the work that others have done because they looked at price over product spec's and performance data.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Sniffingratty (Sniffingratty)
New member
Username: Sniffingratty

Post Number: 5
Registered: 09-2010
Posted on Saturday, October 09, 2010 - 04:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I think that I may go with an aluminum ridge from Lomanco, it is a lot cheaper and seems to have basically the same design as the shingle vent and filter vent.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bud (Bud)
Member
Username: Bud

Post Number: 24
Registered: 02-2010
Posted on Thursday, October 07, 2010 - 08:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

be certain to use a bead of sealant (your choice, I don't like silicones, they don't seem to adhere like a mastic or butyl) just above on in line with the fasteners and between the fastening flange and the roofing material. This serves to adhere the vent to the roof which aids in the service life (as the wind works on the vent it can vibrate and loosen over time, I haven't fixed on of these problems since this morning) it will also seal against wind driven rain the may try to enter the roof between the vent and the roofing.

Follow AV's directions and you should be good to go...

If you need more help than what you are getting from the 800-airvent # let me know I might know a few people there that can give better answers.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Sniffingratty (Sniffingratty)
New member
Username: Sniffingratty

Post Number: 4
Registered: 09-2010
Posted on Wednesday, October 06, 2010 - 12:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Well I called Air vent and spoke with several people. They are not confident that the filter vent is appropriate for slate roofs, even though slate is mentioned briefly in the installation instructions. One rep said that the single vent is appropriate with tile ridge, but I have not seen any tile ridge that is nailed on the edges, have you? (The rep said the the ridge tiles could go over the top of the vent and be nailed at the edges.)

I think that I may just get a copper filter vent and try to make it work, I don't see any reason why it shouldn't work so long as I pre-drill the holes through the slate to attack it to the roof. It seems like that is the best option for a continuous ridge vent.

So that is where I'm at, any other thoughts?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bud (Bud)
Member
Username: Bud

Post Number: 23
Registered: 02-2010
Posted on Tuesday, October 05, 2010 - 05:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Shinglevent II is available in 7 and 9 inch widths that are made to be used with other materials and some special sized shingles. You may have to be creative to make the product work.

You could also use the metal ridge vent made by AirVent, it has the internal weather filter, the external baffle (a very important part) and it is available in copper for a better than average finish for a better than average roof.

Another option is making Airvents 'Utility Filter Vent' work. You would actually install it to fit custom, fastening through it as needed to finish the roof. It is the equivalent of half of a standard ridge vent and would have to be used on both sides. You would place it over the head of the slates/tiles a row or 2 from the peak (you would fill in below it solid for the tiles) then overlay the U-vent with the finish rows and cap it. A 3/4 inch slot would be cut in the deck corresponding to the placement of the U-vent (3/4" by 12" gives you the magical 9 sq in of NFV that is recommended for attic ventilation).
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Sniffingratty (Sniffingratty)
New member
Username: Sniffingratty

Post Number: 3
Registered: 09-2010
Posted on Tuesday, October 05, 2010 - 10:11 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi guys, thanks for the link. I read "Principles of Attic Ventilation." They obviously recommend the Shingle Vent II baffled passive ridge vent system. What do yall think about that system on a slate roof? Is it possible to install over slate? Is it possible to cover it with copper? I called Air Vent and they didn't know about using it on slate, they said that you may not be able to nail it down through the slate.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 526
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Sunday, October 03, 2010 - 04:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It is all roofing, and water still runs down hill. It makes sense to use what is available in the area you live. Thatch in the far reaches of the Pacific, plus a lot of coragated metal because it is easy to ship. Sod roofs in the plains of America in the mid to late 1800's, and wood shingles and shakes in the Northwest where that was most prevalent.

Slate makes sense almost everywhere, but the transportation makes it prohibitive for shipping long distances. With that said, how do they ship it all the way from Brazil and China to the U. S. ? Not very green!

I cut my teeth on shingles way back, and done right it is still a good roof, it just doesn't last as long as a well installed slate roof. The big problem is that a lot of the "shingles" and a lot of the "slates" and Manufactured tiles for that matter are not installed correctly anymore. It shows! Do a good job at whatever you install, and we will all be better off. In my opinion anyway! I am "Old School"
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bud (Bud)
Junior Member
Username: Bud

Post Number: 20
Registered: 02-2010
Posted on Saturday, October 02, 2010 - 08:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I cannot find that video in my collection, I will dig a little tomorrow to see if I have it on disc. I did however contact AirVent to request a copy. Very likely they will send it to me on disc, I will forward it to you if I get it and you want it.

Good to know there is another good shingle roofer out there and that a slater can appreciate that us shingle guys do have skills. To often we are seen as those that can do nothing else, or the bottom of heap. Truth be told, there are things that the average shingle roofer doesn't know about and those things are what sets us apart. I personally owe a debt of gratitude to the slaters and wood shinglers of old for the methods and technical skills that I use on shingle roofs today. I don't believe in the use of sealant as flashing, I will walk away from a job where the customer wants a product or a procedure that I disagree with.

Shingle roofers can be craftsman too, in the mean time I will dream of being a slater and continue to study the skills applying them slowly and surely. I will just work asphalt and metal to pay the bills.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 525
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Saturday, October 02, 2010 - 08:34 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Bub, I believe it was called "Forces of Nature", and at the end they have interviews with different contractors. My Brother Tim is one of them. They mention his name FYI. He is a geally good shingle roofer.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bud (Bud)
Junior Member
Username: Bud

Post Number: 19
Registered: 02-2010
Posted on Saturday, October 02, 2010 - 09:37 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Old School I will watch for him...which video is it? I have most of there stuff on disc for training and presentations so now I can use that one and tel folks that I know a guy that I met on the net who is related to the guy that appears in the end of the one video.

Seriously though it is pretty cool. In my travels in the world of roofing, I am amazed how many people I have run into that are somehow in the 'thick' of it, both directly and indirectly. The resources that it creates is invaluable.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 523
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Friday, October 01, 2010 - 10:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Bud, watch the Air Vent video again and pay particular attention to the last part of it. My Brother Tim is on it (crookston) He is famous!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Bud (Bud)
Junior Member
Username: Bud

Post Number: 18
Registered: 02-2010
Posted on Friday, October 01, 2010 - 07:21 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Educate yourself at AirVent.com, there is a course on the site called the 'Principle of Attic Ventilation'.

Old Schools suggestion is often the only fall back when we cannot get air to enter at the eaves however it is not the best system.

In the perfect world we want 9 square inches of net free ventilation along the eave and the peak for both sides (a balanced system). What you are describing sounds like a potential leak in wind driven weather.

It may not look the best however the proper installation of powered vents would allow for the exhausting of attic air, the ridge can be closed to keep the weather out. But! don't just add a powered exhaust unless you have the proper inlet or you haven't solved anything and you may create other concerns.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 522
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Thursday, September 30, 2010 - 09:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

They insulated them after the slate was installed?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Sniffingratty (Sniffingratty)
New member
Username: Sniffingratty

Post Number: 2
Registered: 09-2010
Posted on Thursday, September 30, 2010 - 01:02 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I need something that will work with insulated cathedral walls.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 521
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Wednesday, September 29, 2010 - 07:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I would just use a power vent or a couple of big gable vents to keep the air moving. Both work well.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Sniffingratty (Sniffingratty)
New member
Username: Sniffingratty

Post Number: 1
Registered: 09-2010
Posted on Wednesday, September 29, 2010 - 02:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi everyone,

Have any of you used this tile ridge system (over a new slate roof): The tiles are MonierLifetile concrete "Spanish" tile with Figaroll/Zephyr Roll venting system.

Basically the zephyr roll goes over the ridge board to "keep water out" but still allowing it to vent. The Spanish style concrete tiles are just nailed on over that with no mortar so it just vents through the cracks.

My concern is that the tiles will not be fastened very tightly because there is no mortar.

However this is by far the best deal that I have found for ridge tiles, so I may go with this system if it has worked for anyone else or sounds good to the pros.

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Program Credits Administration