Tools - Cutting / Bending Copper Flas... Log Out | Topics | Search
Moderators | Register | Edit Profile

Slate Roof Central Message Board » Slate Roofs » Tools - Cutting / Bending Copper Flashings « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Stephen J Taran
Advanced Member
Username: Steve_t

Post Number: 45
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 06, 2008 - 11:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Rodney,
We have and use the tapco Xl you are asking about it works real good for basic easy bends, and is nice to have with the sliter, we have a sheet metal shop set up where we bend our drip edge and more detailed stuff. The guys use the tapco for Transisition flashings, apron flashins simple stuff. The only bad thing about it the tapco does not like to bend a hem like on drip edge or the bottom of an apron/counter flashing.But if you have to bend a hem instead of squeezeing it in the jaws and trying to smush it flat you bend the hem as tight as you can in the brake, then close the jaws tight, start to lift the folding bar up set the hem in against the bar and the face of the jaws and squeeze it shut. ( I hope you can follow that it seems alot easy to do than to write it.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ron kugel
Advanced Member
Username: Slateworks

Post Number: 48
Registered: 09-2006
Posted on Saturday, March 01, 2008 - 11:16 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

One more post - Instaed of 20 ga.:should be 20 oz. copper that the Maxum Brake will bend.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ron kugel
Advanced Member
Username: Slateworks

Post Number: 47
Registered: 09-2006
Posted on Saturday, March 01, 2008 - 09:27 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The 19 " throat allows you to put a 36"w sheet in the brake and rip it with the Tapco cut off tool to 18" or any width that you want,we use alot of sheet stock copper 3'w x 8'-10'L,also we just bent some flat lock copper for a small job on site
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ron kugel
Advanced Member
Username: Slateworks

Post Number: 46
Registered: 09-2006
Posted on Saturday, March 01, 2008 - 09:18 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Looks like my first post did not go thru-I would buy the MaxumXL 19" throat by tapco also buy the stand and Cut off tool(at least the cut off tool works great & saves alot of time) Easy to transport or set up in shop will bend 20 ga ect..I have the pro 19 (wish I had the Maxum) but it has bent 1000's of feet of copper and still works great..A shop brake is great to have but for me the Tapcos work very well,I do have a shop brake but seldom use it we do alot of bending on site.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

ron kugel
Advanced Member
Username: Slateworks

Post Number: 45
Registered: 09-2006
Posted on Saturday, March 01, 2008 - 09:09 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Also th 10'6" size comes in handy gives you some options for fascia,valleys,ridge caps ect..
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Walter Musson
Intermediate Member
Username: Walter_musson

Post Number: 39
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Friday, February 29, 2008 - 08:50 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Rodney,
The brake I have on the trailer is an 8 16 Capable of bending 8' long stock of 16 gauge metal. It's much more substancial than a Tapco brake if you're using 20 oz. copper.
What's the stock you'll be using for gutter linings?
Heres a link to an album of pictures of a wood gutter lining job .
http://share.shutterfly.com/action/welcome?sid=8cbsmrhq0mY&notag=1
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Rodney Richardson
New member
Username: Biggutter

Post Number: 4
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Friday, February 29, 2008 - 08:38 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I just want to say thanks guys for your input and for posting pix. Whats the difference between the brake you transport (Walter) and the one I,m looking at (Tapco)? I can get 10' lengths from the tapco, and just 4' lenghts from the one you are suggesting (Joe). And You are saying yes to what (Slateman).
Rodney Richardson
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Rodney Richardson
New member
Username: Biggutter

Post Number: 3
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Friday, February 29, 2008 - 08:24 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

goto tapcotools.com and look at the maximum xl and the pro 14 heavy duty. Those are the brakes im looking at. I do not have a shop yet so i need to look at portable. And these brakes come with stands and cut-off tools.
Rodney Richardson
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 228
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Thursday, February 28, 2008 - 05:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Here's an example of us using a 4 foot Tennsmith brake on the tailgate of our truck for a job we did about 5 years ago. It's that green thing down there. We were bending up 20 ounce copper standing-seam snow apron on the site.


tennsmith 4' brake on tail gate
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Walter Musson
Intermediate Member
Username: Walter_musson

Post Number: 38
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Thursday, February 28, 2008 - 08:14 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Heres one I transport from job to job when doing gutter work.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Slate Affair Inc.
Senior Member
Username: Slate_man

Post Number: 175
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Thursday, February 28, 2008 - 05:43 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Rodney, I would say yes. A tapco brake is made different then a tennsmith brake(The tennsmith don't have anythink in the way of the material when you slide your material in to the throat). You will have limits with a tapco but its easier to move around. A tapco has big C-supports that limit the amount of materials that can go in to the brake. You can still make all your bends but you will need to float the material on the out side of the bending beam. I know a few people that have mounted a bigger brake on a trailer like a tennsmith, proformer, national, or roperwhitney are all good brakes for this. If you are mostly using it to bend gutter, you will not want a small 4 foot brake but morely a 10 foot brake to make the longer pcs. If you do most of your work on site the tapco will be better. If you have a building to set up a shop you may want to go with a tennsmith or another brake.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 227
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Wednesday, February 27, 2008 - 09:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Rodney - maybe you're talking about gutter tongs. We will be selling those as well, once the new shopping cart is set up. In the meantime, you can get them from Stortz. Tell them I sent you...
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 226
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Wednesday, February 27, 2008 - 09:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We use this 4" brake a lot. The stand is good in the shop, but you can take the brake off the stand and use it on the job when you need it. For bigger stuff, we use an 8' Tennsmith.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Rodney Richardson
New member
Username: Biggutter

Post Number: 2
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Wednesday, February 27, 2008 - 06:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

do i need a brake with a 19" throat for bending yankee gutters or is a brake with a 14" throat good enough.
Rodney Richardson
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Slate Affair Inc.
Senior Member
Username: Slate_man

Post Number: 174
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Wednesday, February 27, 2008 - 04:56 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Rodney, 14gauge is pretty heavy duty brake for typical roofing. I wood go with the model that bends about 22 gauge, the heavies metal we bend is 24g for standing seam. I also suggect the stand, this help alot with using the brake with someone or without another person.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 224
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 26, 2008 - 10:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We don't sell shears because you can buy them anywhere, although we will be adding Klenk snips to the store this year. I'm in the process of installing a new shopping cart system (Feb. 2008) and am waiting to finish it before adding any new items.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Rodney Richardson
New member
Username: Biggutter

Post Number: 1
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Tuesday, February 26, 2008 - 01:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am trying to decide between buying a tapco max- i - mum xl or a tapco pro 14 heavy duty.
I will be relining yankee gutters mostly, and maybe some soffit and fascia (alum). i'm not sure what i might need the bigger one for.
Rodney Richardson
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Daniel Ernst
Posted on Friday, January 28, 2005 - 11:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Any of you have favorite brand tools / methods for cutting and bending copper?

Do you use hand shears? Do you score and snap? On the job, how would you make, say a straight 24" cut on 20 oz. copper?

Do you own small hand brakes, or do you bend flashings using jobsite materials (i.e. ladder, 2X lumber)? What about step flashings?

Joe - You sell hand tongs for small flashing / bending jobs, but no shears. Is this because sheet metal shears are in just about every hardware store - and they work just fine?

Many thanks for any recommendations!

Daniel
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

slateworks
Posted on Saturday, January 29, 2005 - 08:35 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Daniel, Use sheet metal shears to cut copper,when making longer straight cuts,purchase at most hardware stores,either your basic larger shears or even the duck bill style works fine,also you should have a pair of red & green handle aviation snips,you also should have a pair of small hand tongs either 3" or 6" blades. To bend your larger pieces,such as valleys, I would rent a aluminum brake if you could (a good one)Or go to a Heating or roofing contractor in your area and for a fee they may bend your larger pcs.Step flashing can be cut to size and bent easily as you stated above (wood & ladder ect.).I guess if you purchased the H/H copper you could form it into your valleys,Personally I like to bend valleys on a brake. We use a Tapco adjustable (for metal thickness)top locking brake with a 19"throat and a cutting wheel that fits on to the brake- to bend and cut most of our flashings at the job site,works very well.Good luck. Ron
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Walter Musson
Posted on Saturday, January 29, 2005 - 02:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ron's suggestion is a good one.Find a roofing shop and have them do your long bends.
What tools will you be using for the Royal purple install Daniel?Do you have a slate hammer and cutter?
Best regards,
Walter
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Walter Musson
Posted on Saturday, January 29, 2005 - 04:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I like Wiss 12" or 14"straight pattern snips.As Ron notes,you should have left and right aviation snips;the ones I like are Max 2000 by Malco.They have a lifetime warranty from my distributor-take an old worn out pair in and get a new pair,no questions asked.I really think Fairmont tongs,a set of straight and the other offset are the best hand seamers you can own.They are a little hard to find so let me know if you need help if you think you might want them.Stortz and Malco make serviceable tongs as well.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Daniel Ernst
Posted on Saturday, January 29, 2005 - 10:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Ron and Walter!

I have yellow handled aviation snips (not right or left handed as you describe - hopefully not a bad compromise?). I also have 3" hand tongs. Both are Wiss brand. Compared to other makes / models available locally, they appeared to be of good quality.

I won't have to bend the valley copper, just make cuts at the top (transition of valley and ridge roll). Most of my cutting and bending is for the chimney flashings - step pieces, corners, and reglets. It sounds like what I have will do the job. I just wanted to make sure I wasn't missing any tricks before sectioning out the copper sheets! It hit me when I picked up the copper that you pros must have substantial brakes and shears for the volume of work you do - and I didn't want to move forward without a reality check.

For the slate, I purchased the Stortz European styled slate hammer, Stortz ripper, and GT Pro cutter. I was a little surprised at the hammer weight. It seemed very light until I started nailing the slates, but now I'm a believer. Hopefully the ripper won't see much use, but when I do pull it out I think I'll grab my 28 oz. Estwing framing hammer. The cutter works like a dream. I used a couple of broken slates for practice, found that I was comfortable with it in a matter of minutes.

Thanks again for the feedback!

Daniel
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

admin
Posted on Sunday, January 30, 2005 - 01:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We use straight cutting Wiss aviation snips for just about everything on the job. They can be bought anywhere. We don't do spouting work, otherwise we'd use the right and left cutters as well.

I may add snips to the store this year - I ran into a brand called Klenk, which is supposed to be the first ones ever made. They're in Ohio. I need to get a pair and try them out, but they have been highly recommended by an Ohio architect.

Years ago, we used to drop off sheet metal at a local sheet metal shop and have it slit or bent in long pieces, but we have our own equipment now. Most of our replacement valleys (95%) are formed into the valley and not creased at all, so no metal working equipment is needed. We don't cleat valleys either (because we don't solder them), so we don't need to fold the edges. We crease valley centers on very steep roof slopes and we install an inverted V groove in the valley center when needed (when we have two opposing slopes that are asymmetrical), but that isn't very often.

Of course, we have electric shears (Milwaukee) for those rare occasions when we need to make a lot of long sheet metal cuts on the job site, but we rarely use them. We also take a 4' brake to the job site when we need it, but that's also rare. Most of the time, we just bend the copper over a plank, porch railing, chimney corner, or whatever has a sharp edge and is handy.

The hand tongs that we sell that I like the best for over-all use is the 45 degree regular duty hand tong (http://www.jenkinsslate.com/store_tongs.html#tongs2). If I have to keep only one tong handy while working - that's the one I select first. Second would be the straight tongs (http://www.jenkinsslate.com/store_tongs.html#tongs5).

Joe Jenkins
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ted Timmer
Posted on Thursday, February 03, 2005 - 08:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Joe, I own Klenks and Wiss. I think I like the Klenks better. I too tend to use my straights much more often. I have a pair of the plastic aviators with the sprung handles (the spring saves the back of my fingers the many blisters, also they're lighter with replaceable blades).

Two questions: why the crimped valley on a steep slope? I am working some 20 and 16 pitches right now where the architect specs call for a 1 inch crimp with six inches exposed on either side and six inches under the shingles (cedar in this case) and a hem for cleats. That's a 26 inch stretch and 10 inches of waste. I have 500 feet of valley. I omitted the crimp and the cleat hem and used a 24 inch stretch. I can't see it failing. Any thoughts?

Next question. I have always flashed chimneys as per you specs in the Bible. On this job, the masons brought the chimneys through the roof and then kept bugging me to flash them. I could understand Russian or the need to flash the chimneys before the brick veneer went on, but I flashed one and told them it was ready. They said no, that the counterflash wrapped over the concrete block by 1.5 inches would leak. Then they explained how I should flash it: the counter flashing should completely cover the block and wrap up the face of the block on the inside of the chimney. In effect, creating a pan that their stone and/or brick would sit on top of. I have never heard of this. They said that if the mortar leaks, it will run down to the pan and out over the step flashing. It makes sense (save for the part of mortaring stone to a copper shelf) but consumes copper like mad. Any thoughts?

Thanks,
Ted Timmer
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Daniel Ernst
Posted on Friday, February 04, 2005 - 08:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ted,

Regarding the chimney flashing technique - what you have described is typically used at the base of a brick veneered wall.

When masons install brick on a standard stud wall (i.e. 2X6 w/ plywood or blackboard sheathing) they leave a 1" gap between the sheathing and the brick. At the base of the brick wall they create weepholes - vertical joints without mortar.

Brick, as well as most masonry, is very porous. Depending on the vapor pressure gradient, moisture is driven to the back side of the brick, where it accumulates and flows down to the weepholes. Picture a soaking rain followed by plentiful sunshine - the bricks literally realease steam - on both faces. The inside face is colder, so the moisture condenses there or is driven into the sheathing and insulation cavity.

The pan flashing you described is used to protect the wooden frame and sheathing from the moisture that accumulates at the base of the wall - allow it to exit the weepholes.

If they are laying brick directly against the chimney flue block, then I don't understand the purpose of the pan flashing. Moisture will diffuse from the brick into the block. Any wind driven rain that penetrates the mortar will be absorbed by the brick and block - and eventually dry to the interior or exterior, depending on conditions.

Regards,
Daniel
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Walter Musson
Posted on Saturday, February 05, 2005 - 03:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ted,
There's no reason why your valley detailing won't work just fine for water flow,but how about the bruised ego on the architect.Will he cause problems for you once he discovers you have changed his details in the field?Maybe you have had it cleared with the GC and all is fine.
In my experience architects don't like to be proven wrong on their detailing unless great care is taken to assuage their egos.
Your second question Daniel has given an excellent response to.I've never used this technique on chimney work but one high end builder on the Maine coast uses it on his big masonry fireplace chimneys.I think their theory is as Daniel points out brick and mortar are porous,and with high winds and heavy rains there might be some possibility of leakage,so they eliminate this chance by overkill in the flashing detailing.It can't hurt to do it if it's built into the budget from the start for the extra labor and copper required.If you bid on a conventional flashing system and are now faced with added expense,perhaps you can submit a change order or convince the GC to allocate more funds for the work.
good luck.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ted Timmer
Posted on Saturday, February 05, 2005 - 06:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks for both of the responses to my questions.

Walter, I did not ask the architect as I believe he was fired soon after delivering the prints but I probably would have had he been around. As for the flashing, I talked to a couple of other builders out here and they only do the thru chinmney style. I did find that the Lead Sheet Council is now recommending it, as well. I just had never heard of it.

The curious point on this project in regards to what Daniel said is that the house is being sided with a 12 inch thick granite veneer (over plywood and tar paper) and they didn't bother to thru flash the veneer. Hmmm?

Again, thank you.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Joe Jenkins
Posted on Monday, February 07, 2005 - 08:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Ted,

I'm in Arizona at the moment and haven't had access to email, hence my delay in responding.

The reason for creasing valleys down the center on a very steep slope (with a narrow valley exposure such as you may find on a mansard or on dormers) is because the metal fits tighter against the roof and will not interfere with the laying of the slate. A "crease" is simply a straight line bend, not an inverted "V" groove. In most cases on standard slopes (i.e. 8:12 to 12:12) a center crease is not needed, but is instead mostly a matter of style.

The inverted V groove, which I think you're calling a crimp, is not needed on symmetrical valleys either, but is a matter of style as well. Some architects insist upon it, but it isn't needed unless the slopes are different and/or the roof areas are very different in size and water may be forced under one side of the valley slates due to excess water pressure from the other side. The V groove diverts the water and prevents this from happening. For example, if you have a large, steep surface area on a church slate roof draining against a smaller dormer or smaller gable roof of lesser slope, you will want to have a V groove in the valley.

The through-wall flashing is a another issue. There are places for through-wall flashing, but I have never seen it on a chimney where it penetrates the roof. That doesn't mean it can't happen, it just means I haven't see it myself. My guess is that your chimney masons were thinking of the chimney like a building construction wall. The difference, of course, is that chimneys, by their nature allow water to enter them in the form of rain, whereas building walls do not want any water entering them at all. So the flashing details should not be the same. I can't comment on the merits of the flashing system you're describing without seeing it myself or at least seeing a drawing.

Joe
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

tewks
Posted on Saturday, February 19, 2005 - 07:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Ted


That flashing system seems a bit over the top unless the costs are built in. I've seen something similar done on high-end jobs here in seattle, where rain is pretty much constant, but even here it typically adds quite a bit to the cost. Too much copper and Elbow Butter. You have much better things to be doing.

On another note, I've got these really large slate pieces I've been trying to deliver your way...maybe you could use them on this job?

Later


Tewks - 206-616-2129 / 206-525-2909
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Peter
Posted on Sunday, February 20, 2005 - 07:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Ted,

The vast majority of the chimneys built in Ireland, the UK, France and Germany are masonry with flue liners.

In these we fit a lead chimney tray where the back of the chimney exits the roof to prevent any moisture travelling throught the chimney into the building as described by Daniel.

We do not use the plywood box and face it off with a brick veneer, although I expect that it's just a matter of time before the system arrives here.

You stated the bricklayers are Russian so they are probably just doing the job as they would expect to in Europe.

They should have told you that a pan is acceptable and you can fit that in one piece allowing the back to extend out as a cover flashing for the back valley gutter.

Kind Regards,

Peter Crawley, M.I.o.R.

www.crawleyroofing.com
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Mark Boise
Posted on Sunday, February 19, 2006 - 01:33 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hello Mr. Jenkins,
Not really in your business, but we do build copper roofs... for exotic birdhouses. Nothing of your magnitude but it helps with the bills (no pun intended), about 500/year.

It sounds like you and your contributers do this day to day so I thought you guys would be best to ask. We would like to work with 16oz. sheets, I acquired a fair amount at auction, and it gives a good solid look.

We wrap a 3/8 cedar roof approx. 20 x 20" overall. I'm using the Klenks for straight cuts and Wiss snips for trimming with good luck. The difficulty is the tight radius bends over the plywood edges we wrap with about a 1" overlap all the way around, heat has been our best friend so far. Also we would like to put (V) -^- ridges (that run from ridge to bottom) about every 1.5" apart for appearance. Could these things be accomplished with an investment in an aluminium brake with cutting wheel. If yes do you suggest a brand? Also what type of industrial adhesives do you use w/copper/slate(the walls are stone)?

Just as a note.. labor is cheap in Russia

Thanks
Mark B.
FreeBird Homes
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Joe Jenkins
Posted on Monday, February 20, 2006 - 08:54 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

A 24" steel brake would be your best bet. A finger brake or "box brake" is a good investment. You can glue copper to slate with roof cement or a good quality silicon caulk.

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Program Credits Administration