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Stephen J Taran Jr.
Posted on Monday, January 17, 2005 - 09:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

On the last four roofs we have done I have used slate from several different suppliers. I want to know if anyone else seems to think there has been a decrease in quality over the last few years. We have got thick and thin ,(being a slate order of 1/4" thickness we get paper thin to 1/2" thick) also some bowed twisted thick chunks that were not split off.On any slate job I figure on 10% for cutting loss on cut up roofs and we seem to use it all with little to spare. Are we just to fussy or has mass producing a hand made product got out of control in trade to make more money???
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Tuesday, January 18, 2005 - 11:48 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You can reduce the reject slate quantity by buying only slates that have punched holes, for example. When the slates are stacked and drilled, no one is looking at them to make sure the holes are being drilled at the correct end. So you end up with slates that have knobs on the top end, etc., and have to be rejected. Also, when the slates are punched for nail holes, they will break during punching if they are defective. The drilled slates allow the defective ones to pass through undetected. It's worth it to only buy punched slates or to have the slate manufacturer agree to punch the holes for your order (if they otherwise typically drill them).

Joe
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Steve Taran Jr
Posted on Thursday, January 20, 2005 - 08:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thats all we use is punched slate.
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slateworks
Posted on Friday, January 21, 2005 - 01:31 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hey Steve start adding 15% to make up for slate that you will not use and your loss from cuts.Slate suppliers have the same problems as all of today's business's,higher operating cost,finding skilled labor ect..and I do not know if this would be true?,I would think after all the years of removing slate from the quarries and incresed competition that the prime slabs have become a hard to find item? We have recieved slate from different suppliers in all of the pallets you will find cracked ones,holes punched on the thick end,knobs,bowed ect.so adding a little extra to the order has really helped make up for the rejects.And as Joe stated punched slate may have less rejects. Once you start to think about all that goes into delivering a square of slate to a job site the cost per square for standard 1/4" is pretty fair,seems even a little low to me. Mass production of a handmade product just to cover increased expenses to get that square of slate out the door is also part of the increase in the amount of rejects,but all in all we have been satisfied with most the new slate we have installed,the one bad one was we ordered Vermont black and the supplier sent us a Spainish black this was 12 to 14 years ago and I knew the slate was different but I did not know it was from spain,luckily the roof is still holding up no signs of pyrite,I nevered placed another order with that supplier,the same supplier is the one who did the same thing to a customer of ours(we did not install the roof ,just maintained it over the years) who ordered vermont clear black #1 grade,they got the spainish slate (lots of pyrite)instead and we replaced the roof 14 years later with new slate that the supplier paid for.Comes down to trying to make that extra dollar by buying a cheaper product and passing it off as higher quality slate.-- After sending many slate back down the ladder hoist(and cussing the guy out who put these twisted gnarled slate on a pallet to install on a roof,thinking if he were to install this slate maybe then he could understand what slate can be used and what slate should be rejected)we try to sort thru the slate then send them up the hoist for installation,save the rejects for cuts ect.I am a little slow,Took a few new slate installations to figure it out..Take it easy. Ron
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Peter
Posted on Friday, January 21, 2005 - 02:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi,

We use a lot of Penrhyn (Welsh Slate) it's rated up in the top five for Europe anyway, Joe will have seen them and may agree about the quality.

We grade each pallet and that's after paying for pre-holing and grading.

The difference is not that bad in fact most just use them straight out of the pallet and fit them as they land on the roof.

Personally I don't like to see humps and bumps on a finished roof although some people seem to think that they should be able to count each slate from the ground.

We grade in the following way, Heavies, Mediums and lights, the heaviest go on the bottom courses, mediums in the centre and the lights or thinnest to the top.

Any faulty or twisted slate is set to one side and used for cuts to the valleys, hips and the lightest (within reason) as the eaves course.

I agree for the price paid for the slate we shouldn't have to employ a man to grade them before sending them up but we have never done it any other way.

Regards,

Peter Crawley,

www.crawleyroofing.com
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steve T
Posted on Friday, January 21, 2005 - 07:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ron

have you ever tried Taran Brothers slate in poultney vermont They are one of the oldest and do not advertise much but have good quality another is camara slate they both take pride in there slate both being family owned for so long. I live in the slate valley you should make plans to come up and I could take you on tour to the quarries or any other roofers for that matter who write on this site. Let me know but adding more % does sound like the right thing to do
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John Chan
Posted on Monday, January 24, 2005 - 08:22 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

15% is about the right % to add for cutting, bad slate, and leftovers for the homeowner, when using most Vermont slates. You can cut that % down substantially if you use Penrhyn or even lower with North Country Unfading Black, but you'll be paying more per sq. There are also a couple of suppliers (in the slate valley) that have much more uniform slate, but you'll pay more per square for it. So, it pretty much balances out in the end. It also depends if your customer wants a very uniform looking roof or one with some texture in it.

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