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Randy Blank
Posted on Friday, November 19, 2004 - 12:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We are planning to remove slate tiles from a porch that must be replaced. Is it possible to convert what slate we remove into an island countertop in the kitchen?? Is there a "how to" somewhere for doing such a project??
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Peter
Posted on Friday, November 19, 2004 - 07:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Randy,

I would not say impossible, but it would take a lot of patience and care to get a nice finish.

Most slate that is used for worktops, floors etc are finished surfaces about 1" thick with square edges.

It would be possible to cut the slates down to a tile size squaring the edges as you do so.

The big question mark would be getting the polished finish on the surface.

There are coatings available for sealing surfaces that would leave the worktop easy to clean.

Personally if I wanted to find a use for the slate I would consider a patio area or similar, worktop must be clean and smooth for hygiene purposes.

Best of luck with your project.

Kind Regards,

Peter Crawley, M.I.o.R.

www.crawleyroofing.com
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1roofpro
Posted on Saturday, November 20, 2004 - 07:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm a slater, but last winter i laid 3000 sf of ungauged flooring slate. i'm here to tell you it looks fantastic on the floor and probably would look as good on a countertop, but it took an ungodly amount of time to get the finish we wanted and to seal it! good luck and you wont know unless you try it!
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Peter
Posted on Monday, November 22, 2004 - 06:06 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi 1roofpro,

I saw slate floor tiles being laid, like you said they looked great.

I'm sure a lot easier than your project because the slate was originally cut and finished as floor tile.

A resin product was used as the final finish to achieve the polished finish, the interesting thing was the slate was laid, the resin applied and then the grouting.

Looking at the work that went into the floor I think I'll stay on the roof LOL.

Kind Regards,

Peter Crawley, M.I.o.R.

www.crawleyroofing.com
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Monday, November 22, 2004 - 01:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You can lay roof slates on counters. Pick out the ones you want to use - one idea is to select the ones that have interesting weather marks. Cut the slates into square and rectangular shapes (or whatever). The idea is to cut out the nail holes, broken edges, uninteresting sections, etc. Place a cement board base on your counter - 1/4" thick is fine. Glue and screw down the cement board. Wash the slate tiles with soap and water prior to use (and dry them with a rag). Don't use any flaking slates. Select a mix of slate colors if you want to make it interesting. Lay the slates on the cement board with a thin-set epoxy mortar applied with a notched trowel. I like to use them bevel side up, but some people like to use them bevel side down. After the slates have set up (a day or two), grout the tiles with a good grout. Use a dark grout if you want to avoid the appearance of stains in the grout over time. Seal the finished grout with a silicon sealer. You don't have to seal the slate itself. Remember when grouting that you have to remove all excess grout before it sets up completely. Otherwise, you will ruin the job. A rubber trowel is required for grout removal, followed by a damp rag. The same procedure works for walls and floors. Use 1/2" cement board on floors - and make sure the floor has no give to it, otherwise the tiles will crack and come loose.

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