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Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 374
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Saturday, January 09, 2010 - 11:10 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Milo, My pleasure! When you do the work, please post some pictures for all of us to see. We will compliment you for your efforts, and perhaps critique it for you so that you can learn even more. After reading the books and then doing some of the work, a person is "ready" to hear of some of the shortcuts availible, and also the reasons for doing the things we do. At that point, those suggestions finally make sense.

Sadly as you mention, the "pros" response to a lot of the problems with slate is more roofing cement! Wow!

I just recently started to write a book/pamphlet about exactly the points you are making. When I do get further into it, I may post some of it to the forum so others can critique me. As you say, what is happening to the slate industry is also happening in similiar fashion to MANY other professions; with the same sad results. Ciao!
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Milo (Milo)
New member
Username: Milo

Post Number: 7
Registered: 05-2009
Posted on Saturday, January 09, 2010 - 08:27 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Oldschool,
Thankyou for the compliments towards us novices. It is nice to be on a site where the Pros are willing to give advice about his/her trade and lively hood. I have often found that some of the professionals out their take offense when you try to perform some of their work and begin to ask questions. I can only speak for myself, but by trying to take on some projects myself, Im in no way trying to insult or step on the toes of the craftsman/artists out there. I know it takes years to become proficient with many techniques and become a master of one's craft. But, from learning the hard way(with some plumbers, HVAC guys, and carpenters) I have found that many "professinals" out there are nothing but hacks who could have done the job correctly if they just read the directions that came with some of the products used in the projects. This kind of work should be unacceptable to the general public because the info. on how it is to be done correctly is out there. I guess we live in a world where the customer must inform/research for oneself before choosing to pay for a service, whether it be with work on your house, seeing a physician, or investing into your retirement.

By the way, i had a slater who was listed and has contributed to this site work on my roof (chimmney) a few years back. His crew did good work and i was happy with the outcome.

Thanks

(Message edited by Milo on January 09, 2010)
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Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 373
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Friday, January 08, 2010 - 03:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I really get a kick out of reading of the home owners that first read the books and then do their own slate roofs. That shows that there is a real demand for the slate, and it also shows me how really bad a lot of the "roofers" are out there. Sad to say, that a lot of the professionals either can't or won't read. The average homeowner, after reading the slate bible will almost certainly do a better job than most of the roofers out there. Plus, they are not afraid to ask questions. What a breath of fresh air!
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Milo (Milo)
New member
Username: Milo

Post Number: 6
Registered: 05-2009
Posted on Friday, January 08, 2010 - 01:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Tony,
Iam also a home owner with great interest in slate roofs and have done much reasearch including reading Joe's book and keeping up with this site. I hope to start some of my own slating projects starting with a 10X10 shed, then a small garage, and who knows what next. I have bought some tools from Joes store in NW PA and have aquired a lot of good salvaged slate for minimal money around this area. Well to get back to your question...I am not a professional slater or even a roofer and had some questions about the finer details of laying out a slate roof. One source that I found which seems to present sound info concerning these topics was in "The Slate Book" by Bryan and Alan Stearns. I got this book form the New England Slate CO. (along with Joe's book)when I contacted them with some slate questions. The books seems to be a good companion to The Slate Roof Bible although there may be some misinformation in it (concerning the need for underlayment and such) but it did have some detailed info in chapter 6 "Roof Layout" concerning topics such as laying out dormers and intersecting roofs. Again, Im just a homeowner and the slate professionals on this board would have a much better idea if the info in this book is correct.
It is great to see that someone up in Erie is working to preserve/add a slate roof. I live in Titusville but am originally form Erie. It is a shame to see the many slate roofs up there in disrepair and neglected when I visit. Please post pictures of your progress.

(Message edited by Milo on January 08, 2010)

(Message edited by Milo on January 08, 2010)
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Tonyeriepa (Tonyeriepa)
Member
Username: Tonyeriepa

Post Number: 24
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Thursday, January 07, 2010 - 10:39 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks, 666, I wonder why the slate-and-a-half isn't used more often on rakes, especially narrow ones on the sides of dormers. Maybe just aesthetics? And yes, it's subtle on your low-slope roof picture. Old School, thanks for the practical advice on keeping the rows continuous across the roof and not over-thinking it.
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Tinner666 (Tinner666)
Senior Member
Username: Tinner666

Post Number: 64
Registered: 02-2009
Posted on Tuesday, January 05, 2010 - 02:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

One thing to note. Along the sides of the dormer, it's OK to have some larger slates there instead of trying to cut any 1" to 3" slates.
On this page, you will see where I went from 9" slates to 12" slates to run the rake on one side. If I didn't even mention it, it wouldn't be noticable.
http://www.albertsroofing.com/New%20Slate%20Roof.htm

Slate Roof Repairs, Richmond, Va.
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Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 368
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Tuesday, January 05, 2010 - 02:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It depends on how anal you are! You will know where everything is going to be when you mark your lines before you strike them. How do you want it? You will probably want to put a nailer just below the dormer to nail the shorter row on anyway; unless you nail them between the slates that are installed below. (just a lath the thickness of the slate to keep it from pushing up the slate when it is fastened.) I would keep the bottoms of the rows even all the way across the roof. As far as the "bond" of the slates if they are all the same size, again, figure it out before you strike the lines. That is what they make tape measures for. It is what it is though!
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Tonyeriepa (Tonyeriepa)
Member
Username: Tonyeriepa

Post Number: 23
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Tuesday, January 05, 2010 - 10:20 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I plan to slate a section of roof with a large dormer on it.
What is the usual practice for slating up to the front of a dormer and then continuing on up on either side towards the ridge?
1 Is it normal to lay out the field slate (eg 20")and increase the headlap if necessary such that a whole field slate buts up against the front face of the dormer and is then overlain by a shorter (eg 12") slate and then by a 4" apron flashing? This would mean that the line formed by the intersection of the dormer face with the roof plane would not line up with the slate butt line that extends across the rest of the roof.
2 Or can the top of the course at the front of the dormer actually extend up the roof several inches on each side while the 20" slates right in front of the dormer get shortened a bit? That would mean having an L-cut slate on the left and a backwards-L-cut slate on the right edge of the dormer. Maybe that could allow the line of intersect of the dormer front with the roof plane to continue across the roof as a slate butt line?
3 Is symmetry important: would it be OK to have the first row against one side of the dormer start with a whole-width slate while the same row on the other side starts off from the dormer with a half slate?
I think I need to see pictures showing how constant-width slates are laid out as they come up to a dormer!?

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