Insulating under an old slate roof Log Out | Topics | Search
Moderators | Register | Edit Profile

Slate Roof Central Message Board » Slate Roofs » Insulating under an old slate roof « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Heylady9189 (Heylady9189)
New member
Username: Heylady9189

Post Number: 3
Registered: 09-2009
Posted on Thursday, September 03, 2009 - 01:46 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sorry everyone. I've never posted before and accidentally put this in the wrong category. Please ignore it here.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Heylady9189 (Heylady9189)
New member
Username: Heylady9189

Post Number: 1
Registered: 09-2009
Posted on Thursday, September 03, 2009 - 01:42 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hello everyone,
I bought a historic home that has a slate roof, and unfortunately, failed flashings around dormers and chimneys and many layers of bad tar patches. Several roofers have claimed to be able to do slate. One tarred over old tar (didn't work! tar cracked and leaking started again) and another told us that we don't need to replace the flashings, but just clean the valley and inject it with rubber. This does not sound right to me as I think the only way to fix this is to remove the slate and install new flashing. He quoted me $1400 to repair each dormer. I hate to question or challenge professionals because it seems rude, but I do not agree with this method of fixing my roof, and I don't like this price especially when the flashing isn't being replaced. I would like advice on whether this is a good method of repairing the valleys or if my intuition is right. (Also, he wants to remove some nails that have popped up in the roof and replace them with screws. This also makes me uncomfortable, because from what I have read, this would pose problems for removing and repairing individual slates in the future. Is this a new reliable method, or should I trust my intuition that this is incorrect?) This poor roof (and the whole house) has been mistreated over the years in poor repair jobs (or the lack of any repairs) and I don't want to hire someone who isn't going to do it right. Thanks for all the advice.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Braymer (Braymer)
Senior Member
Username: Braymer

Post Number: 129
Registered: 09-2008
Posted on Friday, August 14, 2009 - 08:36 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If that is the newer cellulose, as long as you get that spot dried out, it should still be OK, the newer blow-in Cellulose is treated with borates and other stuff to keep any mold from forming inhibits bugs from getting in there- Cellulose is often blown in wet for increased density and higher R values Once it has completelly Dried.
Sounds like it was not installed perfectly. The idea is to keep the roof boards Cold in the winter while the house is warm- by keeping the isulation Off the roof and venting that airspace properly.
Look closelly at the slate on that side, probly just needs a regular repair. Also - With that bubble wrap, the water could have run down the roof a bit before getting into the cieling, so the actual leak is probly up hill a ways from the stain ..
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Slate_man (Slate_man)
Senior Member
Username: Slate_man

Post Number: 458
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Friday, August 14, 2009 - 05:32 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I don't agree with the way they insulated, but this could be just from a broke or missing slate. I would of installed at least a proper vent systen in each rafter bay, but then you would need to vent the eaves and rigde. That why what old school said would of been the best. Insulate the floor and vent the gables.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 208
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Thursday, August 13, 2009 - 09:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Let's see! The roof was good enough for 70-100 years and all of the sudden they had to go and install insulation right beneath the slate...Why didn't the idiots put the insulation on the floor of the attic?

What they did was never the intent of the people that built the house, and the system was not set up to handle the difference in temprature and air pressure. For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. You are dealing with the "reaction"

If they had insulated the floor and then vented the attic through the gables, there would have been no problem. That is a tough question to answer. People want to be energy efficient, but I see more damage being done to ALL types of homes by the well meaning but stupid than is ever done by the vandals and crooks.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Awvt (Awvt)
New member
Username: Awvt

Post Number: 1
Registered: 08-2009
Posted on Thursday, August 13, 2009 - 07:35 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Local weatherization folks recently insulated an unheated attic by attaching Reflectix (looks like bubble wrap sandwiched between two pieces of Mylar) to the rafters and blowing in a high density cellulose. There is no air space between the roof boards, the cellulose insulation, and Reflectix. Recently a hard-driving rain blew water in and soaked the cellulose, which dripped. The result is a water stain on the second floor ceiling. What is the proper way for the insulation to have been installed? (My slate roof is about 100 years old and slates were installed directly on the roof boards; there is no underlayment. A slate roofer checked roof and made repairs 3 years ago.)

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Program Credits Administration