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TSMartin
Posted on Saturday, January 31, 2004 - 01:21 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I purchased The Slate Roof Bible, 2nd edition in hopes to find how this detail is done. I've scaned through the book several times and see pictures and some drawings of the general area. But nothing in detail how to handle this.
The upper right hand photo on page 167 is exactly what I will be doing. Except, I will be using copper ridge shingles from Vulcan Supply Co. and open copper cleated "W" valley flashing.
Can any one point me in the right direction where I can find info on how to do this correctly?
Thanks
TS Martin
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ken
Posted on Saturday, January 31, 2004 - 06:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

im not familiar with Vulcan ridge shingles, but ill tell you how i join my dormer ridges to the main roof, and if you cant do this with your shingles, you could probably do something like this, and then shingle over it:
lay your ridge metal in place, and cut it so it meets the pich of the slates on the main roof. (this angle should be pretty much the same as your valley cuts.) cut two inches or so down the ridge metal, and bend up two flanges to meet the main roof again.
cut a v shape out of another flat piece of metal, which will fit over the flanges. this piece will lay on the same plane as the slates on the main roof, and is soldered to the ridge piece, on top of the flanges. this piece is sized so that you will have enough side and head lap with the slates on the main roof when everything is tied together.
this makes the junction of the dormer ridge to the main roof watertight. its alot easier to draw than explain though. you could also just smear tar where the two valley flashings meet. (ha ha)
im sure there are other good ways to do it and id be interesdted to hear what other people are doing.
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TSMartin
Posted on Saturday, January 31, 2004 - 06:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks alot. I think I get the general idea. I agree that pics/drawings would be great. That's why I'm kind of dissappointed in the book. It has a lot of great things in it but this particular detail seems to have been overlooked.
Acutually those ridge shingles are made by Revere Bennington for their copper roofing. Their dealer is Vulcan Metal Works.
TS
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Monday, February 02, 2004 - 12:28 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

On a slate roof, in this situation, the two valley flashings overlap at the top of the valleys. First one valley is set in place, folded over the top as well as extended up the roof, then the same with the other side. If done correctly, they will not leak at the overlap and no solder is required. The roof is then slated, with the slates overlapping the valley metal on both sides of the valley by 5" minimum. The ridge metal extends over the top of the valley joint and can be caulked where it meets the roof.

This is hard to illustrate in a book because there are nuances to the folding technique that are difficult to show by photos. However, folding valley tops is an important slate roof restoration technique also suitable for use when replacing chimney crickets, bell tower flashings, etc. Although it's an important technique to know, I didn't feel I could illustrate it adequately in a book, so I left it out. That's the sort of thing you learn in a hands-on workshop.
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TSMartin
Posted on Wednesday, February 04, 2004 - 08:40 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks, Joe.
TS

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