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Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 222
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 19, 2008 - 07:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Salvaged slate sources are at http://slateroofers.org/sources_salvaged_slate.html

New slate sources are at http://slateroofers.org/sources_new_slate.html

Salvaged and new ceramic tiles sources are located at http://slateroofers.org/sources_ceramic_tile.html
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David Spradlin
Junior Member
Username: David_spradlin

Post Number: 17
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Tuesday, February 19, 2008 - 09:32 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Have you checked the "Sources of Roof Tile" on this site?
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pd eurek
New member
Username: Detrex

Post Number: 1
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Tuesday, February 19, 2008 - 12:22 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am restoring a Carnegie Library in Nebraska and looking for red tiles used on the roof. any one know companies that create replicates of roofing tiles?

thanks

Paul
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Robert Keal
Posted on Friday, May 11, 2001 - 11:40 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am currently working on a historical review and rehabilitation of a large brick building in Bellefonte PA. This structure is on the National Historic Register, so accurate reproduction is critical to its preservation. The building is roofed with a beautiful slate covered mansard roof with detailed patterning of shaped and colored slates. I'm writing to ask if anyone can connect me with any databases on old slate quarries and records of sales to individual contractors or buildings. I realize this is a long shot as many records have been lost. Any information would be greatly appreciated.
Thank you,
Robert Keal.

Comprehensive Design A/E
2013 Sandy Drive
State Colege PA
ph. 814-238-7706
fax. 814-238-2229
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Jim Germond
Posted on Friday, May 18, 2001 - 05:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Having lived all my life and worked in "The Slate Valley" of Vermont, as well as being a computer-savvy guy and the architect of many computer solutions for the slate industry, I can say with some confidence that no such database such as that which you seek exists.

The slate that you are trying to match is very likely still in production and can be located, although it may take some "digging" (pun intended) Let me know if I can help.
Sincerely,
Jim Germond
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Scott Parkinson
Posted on Monday, January 28, 2002 - 05:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am trying to match an existing roof on an old pumping station in D.C. The slate seems to have a bit of a sheen and equal parts "rust" and what looks to be quartz. I have a sample but I am uncertain as to what it is exactly. Any help would be appreciated.
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Walter
Posted on Tuesday, January 29, 2002 - 03:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sounds to me like it's Buckingham.
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Scott Parkinson
Posted on Wednesday, January 30, 2002 - 01:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That was my first guess as well. B-V Slate is sending a sample so hopefully that will help with clarification.
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Rsemenza@yahoo.com
Posted on Friday, March 01, 2002 - 02:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I drive with one eye looking at slate roofs. I often see these blackish/bluish/dark slates used as repairs on these old houses with sea green roofs. Are these new slates that have not weathered, or am I looking at the wrong colored slate being used for restoration work. If these are new sea green slates, how many years before they will look "acceptable". (a slater would not use black/or grey slate in restoration work, right?)
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Walter Musson
Posted on Friday, March 01, 2002 - 04:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Some folks might not have the right colored slates and substitute those of a different color.
Although not aesthetically correct ,if repaired properly it will keep out the rain.In my area there is mostly grey-black so a lot of guys don't have the Vermont colors when needed.Repairs in the wrong color sure do stand out.Maybe they'll hire another down the road to make it right.
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Tim Dittmar
Posted on Friday, March 01, 2002 - 06:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Back to a few discussions ago first, Buckingham has alot of mica in it and will sparkle reflectively in sunlight- not many varieties will do that. The newer BV also is not particularly smooth even compared to its older examples and is additionally known usually to be somewhat warped- not flat(requiring more attention to bedding than many var.'s) It's also relatively hard even at considerable age and less porous than most- medium grey- frequently becomes olive-colored from sunlight, rusting ridge iron,?- doesn't readily support lichen, etc. even if aged

So you do that too, Rsemenza? Once you've been bitten(or bit into it?), it's never the same. The pretty ones really are, aren't they? You've cued me to use the word "terminology"- as in "define". The terms are usually not agreed upon effectively-yes, "they" didn't restore that roof you mention- probably the owners are "giddy" if it was merely "fixed/repaired" well. The "high-dollar" words like restore sorta' come with some "agreement" as to implication- maybe like as good as/better than/never need "it" again and so forth. Hey! At least "they" used slate, huh? Really ought not be the "first" to deliberately blemish the front- shame!Go around back and swap a few out, what?(I get this way after "5 o'clock"- 'scuse me!) I'll try to "keep it between the lines if you will!" No cellphones....
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Dino
Posted on Saturday, March 02, 2002 - 12:35 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hello again...
It's Friday afternoon and I sit here perusing the discussions. I took note of Scott's post about those slates... "The slate seems to have a bit of a sheen and equal parts "rust" and what looks to be quartz."

About 15% of the slates I'm using look like that. According to The Slate Roof Handbook, the National Slate Association's 1929 puplication, page 75, the quartz-like stuff could also be Hematite. They may also have Tourmaline which is reddish brown to blueish violet, Biotite which is greenish brown to red brown. Biotite is soluble in acids but the first two minerals aren't.
So...
I'm seeing that alot of the red slates I have are fragile and don't look like they will weather as well as the green/grey ones. I'm using them sparingly if at all. The green and gray ones are the tougher ones. Lots of Calcite. Allegedly, these slates came from Turkey and Greece.
The mix I'm working with however, lends itself to the texture the clients are after.

Have a great weekend!
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Ken Cason
Posted on Tuesday, September 03, 2002 - 12:53 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I recently purchased a home built in 1937. I need to replace a few missing slates and some unsightly repairs made with Buckingham slate. My first question deals with the type of slate. My roof appears to have a very slight green tinge (more noticeable when wet) with intermixed light brown pieces. Any ideas on the type of slate? My next question is where could I purchase a small amount of this slate for repairs?

Thanks,
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Joe
Posted on Tuesday, September 03, 2002 - 09:30 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sounds like Vermont slate. Look at the "sources of used slate" list on this site.

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