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Slate_man (Slate_man)
Senior Member
Username: Slate_man

Post Number: 402
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Wednesday, April 29, 2009 - 05:57 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ha, Clay I will stick one in the truck for my next trip down.

The slate is very sound like you said Clay, alot like a monson slate.
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Clay_heald (Clay_heald)
New member
Username: Clay_heald

Post Number: 2
Registered: 10-2007
Posted on Tuesday, April 28, 2009 - 09:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Joe,

Not sure if you are still looking for info on this slate, but it does appear to resemble a Guilford, VT slate. I tend to think of this slate as a rugged, unfading black slate with interesting texture sometimes. As Liam mentions, there are a number of these slate roofs within an hour radius of Brattleboro, VT. Many of these slate roofs are random heights and widths, not cut to any specific sizes. They were typically laid on the roof in a graduated pattern with the largest slates used on the eave and the smallest at the ridge. Try measuring the size of some of the slates, if they are not full integers, it may be another clue that it could be a Guilford slate. Lastly, believe it or not, I've rung pieces of Guilford salvage with a ring tone as good as any Monson or Buckingham. I wouldn't mind viewing a couple of pieces of the slate for fun. Liam, next time you are in the area, I would enjoy seeing a piece of yours as well. Cheers!
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Slate_man (Slate_man)
Senior Member
Username: Slate_man

Post Number: 362
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Thursday, February 12, 2009 - 07:04 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Here is some more info on almost all quarry location through-out Vermonts history.

http://www.e-referencedesk.com/resources/state-symbols/vermont/rock.html

Slate
Metamorphic rock found in southwestern Vermont. It is formed by the compaction and heating of clay, silt or mud. Vermont slate varies in color from red, green, black and purple. Because it splits into thin slabs, slate is used for roofing shingles, sidewalks and floor tiles.



Slate: Three ranges of roofing slate:

Eastern, clay slate near Connecticut river, from Massachusetts line to Essex county; found in Guilford, Windham county; Thetford, Orange county; Waterford, Caledonia county; and other localities and small quarries.
Middle range of clay slate extends from Memphremagog lake to Barnard slate quarries in Northfield, Montpelier, and elsewhere of uniform shade and black.
Western Vermont slate quarried largely in Castleton; also in Fairhaven, Poultney, Wells, and Pawlet, Rutland county; generally of a dark purple color, with occasional blotches of green; very compact and fissile. Large quarries near West Castleton, Hydeville, Scotch hill, and Fairhaven.
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Slate_man (Slate_man)
Senior Member
Username: Slate_man

Post Number: 361
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Thursday, February 12, 2009 - 06:45 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Here is a little info on where you can go to see some of the tools from that time period when they quarried slate.

Guilford Historical Society
1822 Town Hall, Guilford Center Road, Guilford Center, VT
Mailing Address: 236 School Road, Guilford VT 05301
Email: pulpitfm@verizon.netThis e-mail address is being protected from spam bots, you need JavaScript enabled to view it
Phone: 802-257-0147
Contact: Anne Bonneville, curator

The 1822 town hall houses exhibits of Guilford artifacts including a 19th century kitchen, arrowheads, photographs, antique and slate industry tools, textiles, household items, and a directory of Guilford's cemeteries and headstones. The society also operates the 1837 meetinghouse and the 1797 one-room brick schoolhouse.

Hours and Admission: Memorial Day - Columbus Day: Tuesday and Saturday 10:00 am - 2:00 pm, or by appointment. Free. Donations appreciated. Accessible to the disabled.
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Slate Affair Inc.
Senior Member
Username: Slate_man

Post Number: 332
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Sunday, December 28, 2008 - 07:35 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Not the best picture. They where cover in snow, but they look similar, your slate is thicker.




Other time you would cut corners like that is for the 2nd to last course of slate so that you would be able to nail the last course with out drilling or nailing through another pcs of slate.
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Slate Affair Inc.
Senior Member
Username: Slate_man

Post Number: 329
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Friday, December 26, 2008 - 06:28 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Also you would need to cut the corners like that if the slate was warped or the decking wasn't flat in different areas. In doing this a slate roof will overall look better, with less kicked up slate and is a sign of a good slate roofer.
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Slate Affair Inc.
Senior Member
Username: Slate_man

Post Number: 326
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Wednesday, December 24, 2008 - 06:12 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Joe, I do know that there was a quarry in Guilford Vermont. I have talked to people in the Brattleboro area about it when I was work a few different job. I have some from a Libaray in St. Albans VT if you want for comparing. They came from a turret, that how I cut my pcs. Look at my turret post and you can see that.
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Walter Musson
Senior Member
Username: Walter_musson

Post Number: 112
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Wednesday, December 24, 2008 - 05:55 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The shouldered corners would indicate it was used on a curved roof plane so that they would lay flatter.
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Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 344
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Tuesday, December 23, 2008 - 07:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Can anyone shed any light on this slate type? It's reportedly from Guilford, VT. Can anyone verify this? What about the shouldered corners?



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