Slate cutting basics Log Out | Topics | Search
Moderators | Register | Edit Profile

Slate Roof Central Message Board » Slate Roofs » Slate cutting basics « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Shrllc (Shrllc)
Member
Username: Shrllc

Post Number: 24
Registered: 12-2008
Posted on Monday, January 12, 2009 - 05:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Slate cutters run about $80. Your best bet is to get a slate cutter and do the job right.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kwhord (Kwhord)
Senior Member
Username: Kwhord

Post Number: 131
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Thursday, January 08, 2009 - 07:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I disagree, Chris. Cut slates are usually in crucial areas like rake edges, valleys, and hips. These areas take a lot of abuse and they are harder to repair than field. Cutting slate with a slate cutter or a hammer and stake is a vetting process. It stresses the tile much more than cutting on a wet saw. If a tile breaks while cutting with a stake or a slate cutter, it never should have been hung in the first place. You could cut the same tile with a wet saw and probably never discover the flaw until the slate cracks and falls out later.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Chris Wright
New member
Username: Chris_wright

Post Number: 8
Registered: 12-2008
Posted on Thursday, January 08, 2009 - 04:21 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Alan,
I did a lot of house improvements and one thing every home improver has is a wet saw for interior tile work. They run around $60. It will mean you have to make the cuts on the ground, but if the slate edge is out of sight, and you don't worry that the cut edge doesn't have that chipped away slate look, then that will save you a buck or two.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John R. Crookston
New member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 3
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Sunday, January 04, 2009 - 05:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Jeff, as they said in the movie "Tin Cup " "Just grip it and rip it"

Great to see you guys working to do it right!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Jeffrey C Stone
Junior Member
Username: Shrllc

Post Number: 15
Registered: 12-2008
Posted on Tuesday, December 30, 2008 - 06:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I enjoy the freedom of cutting slate while on the roof, my cutters are Stortz, I have one mounted on a piece of 2x6; Two others are not mounted as to allow me to hang them from a slate hook or other implement. I also enjoy the slate nibblers, also stortz. For my apprentice I find the cutter mounted on the board works well in the learning phases of shingle cuts. You can certainly use the cutting edge of your hammer and use a board as a guide although it is allot harder to get a strait cut. The stake option works well, although until you get the hang of it, nice strait cuts are challenging.
As most of my work involves the use of vintage slate shingles a good hard thump with a closed fist will help to bring flaws in the shingle to light and saves marking and cutting a shingle half way and having it fracture in a different direction. For the marginal cost of a slate cutter I believe it a wise choice.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Slate Affair Inc.
Senior Member
Username: Slate_man

Post Number: 288
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Saturday, November 01, 2008 - 07:13 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I made my slaters stake, out of 1 1/2" x 1/4 flat steel two pcs about 22'long, welded together. Then I sharped the bottom of the T-stack so it can be thrown in to a plank or deck depending on what you are doing.

If you don't have a slate hammer with beveled egde, then take another pcs of flat steel thats 16" to 24" and sharp a bevel on the side of the steel that will interset the steel on the slater stake as you hit the slate with the pcs of steel you have beveled. Hope that helps
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 332
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Friday, October 31, 2008 - 12:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

That link (http://josephjenkins.com/store/pages.php?pageid=2) lists the tool videos. Anyone who works on slate roofs should have slate cutter. (http://josephjenkins.com/store/home.php?cat=252)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Eric Braymer
Junior Member
Username: Braymer

Post Number: 16
Registered: 09-2008
Posted on Thursday, October 30, 2008 - 08:49 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Slaters stake is another term for an iron or anvil. I made mine myself. There are pictures and explanations in the SR Bible and on this site >>
http://josephjenkins.com/store/pages.php?pageid=2
then click "slaters stake". Cheers
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Eric Braymer
Junior Member
Username: Braymer

Post Number: 15
Registered: 09-2008
Posted on Wednesday, October 29, 2008 - 04:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If you do it this way, keep the ragged edge on the inside and the nice edge out toward the gable edge of the roof so it is still nice and smooth when looking up from the ground. (you will have one ragged edge trimming like this) Also, cut from the back to get the bevel edge on the face.
Another cutting option is taking a piece of long angle iron and clamping it down securely as an anvil egde and then using a straight and narrow (2") stick of 1/4 inch steel as a slate cutting knife. Scratch a line on the back and cut from the back to get a bevel on the face. There may also be a video of Joseph Jenkins demonstrating cutting with a slate anvil (iron) on his site. The idea and technique is similar. But I really like my cutter - I can even cut right down the middle of a slate most of the time and get two unbroken 1/2 pieces from that one straight cut.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alan Wall
New member
Username: Wallala

Post Number: 2
Registered: 10-2008
Posted on Wednesday, October 29, 2008 - 01:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks, everyone, for the prompt replies. If I start doing more than just half-width slates, I suspect I'll buy a cutter. Right now I'm just focusing on a barn and a shed that each have a single long ridge, no protrusions, etc. Tim, your technique sounds like what I need. I'll give it a try.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Tim Dittmar
Intermediate Member
Username: Tim_dittmar

Post Number: 34
Registered: 05-2008
Posted on Wednesday, October 29, 2008 - 12:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Alan- use your broken/partial slates to practice with on this and maybe to also repair w/ if you learn fast- the old guys(even) would peck(from the backside) a line of closely-spaced holes(maybe half to 3/4 " apart or so) and then "snap" the slate over a backup straightedge- guess what? They could use both halves if that was what they were making- I would prefer a nailset to the slate hammer as you get better control of force and aim- this punching can be done on your thigh(up on the roof if you must)- you might need to clean up the snapped edges if they're really ragged- pay close attention to avoiding cross-grain slates when attempting to produce partial pieces unless the grain works for you(like the left or right side of a valley, etc.) large pliers/elec. dykes(sp?) can be used to "nibble" the edge of a slightly wide slate- sometimes one should punch the added nail holes on really skinny pieces first and then "break" the slate. Good luck!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Eric Braymer
Junior Member
Username: Braymer

Post Number: 13
Registered: 09-2008
Posted on Wednesday, October 29, 2008 - 08:36 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I spent the money on the AJC cutter from Joe's site and am very happy with the cutter. I makes it so much easier and there is less breakage. If you are doing alot of work I would at least look at that cutter and the videos of Joe demonstrating it. It is also better to stay up on the roof and make cuts this way.. Check Joe's site for comparisons and demonstrations of this stuff.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kurtis Hord
Senior Member
Username: Kwhord

Post Number: 108
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Tuesday, October 28, 2008 - 07:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If you have a slate hammer with a cutting shank, you can cut slate with a hammer and stake. You may be able to use a sturdy board or the edge of a work bench instead of a stake. Joe has a video of cutting with a hammer somewhere. Also, you can "score" slate on the back with a wet saw or grinder (not recommended) and then break it over the edge of a work bench to get your bevel.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Alan Wall
New member
Username: Wallala

Post Number: 1
Registered: 10-2008
Posted on Tuesday, October 28, 2008 - 09:34 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm a homeowner who is attempting to do some basic slate repairs the right way. (The local roofers I've talked to all say they screw through the slate to replace it.) I have a slate ripper, slate hooks, ladder hooks, etc. and am pretty comfortable on the roof. I've avoided buying a slate cutter because most of the replacements I need to make are in the main field of the roof. A few, however, are half-slates on the rake edge so I need to cut those. I've read through my first edition of the Slate Roof Bible and looked through this web site, but can't find anything on how to make a few simple straight cuts without using a slate cutter. (I'll buy one if I have to, but just don't feel like it's necessary at this point.) Maybe I just missed that advice? Would appreciate a very basic tutorial. Thanks.

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Program Credits Administration