Folding Ladder w/ Roof Hook. Good id... Log Out | Topics | Search
Moderators | Register | Edit Profile

Slate Roof Central Message Board » Slate Roofs » Folding Ladder w/ Roof Hook. Good idea / Bad idea??? « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Tim Dittmar
Intermediate Member
Username: Tim_dittmar

Post Number: 35
Registered: 05-2008
Posted on Monday, November 03, 2008 - 11:14 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Barry- that's the technique I liked, too- some old, beatup extension ladder no longer safe for climbing would still be basically safe for your application- I liked to think "redundancy" whenever possible- like if the ridge angle was questionable I'd add a rope to a tree or ? on the other side of the house and tie it to the hook or even the ladder itself... sometimes one can slip a pipe and pipeclamp into adjoining rungs to stiffen the whole affair and aid movement around the roof with less scratching of slate and whatever- be safe regardless!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Barry P. Smith
New member
Username: Barry_smith

Post Number: 1
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Sunday, November 02, 2008 - 02:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We always tie 2 ladders together by lapping them about 3 rungs side-by-side, and tying them with 2 short ropes. This makes a very flexible system that is quick and safe.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Eric Braymer
Junior Member
Username: Braymer

Post Number: 11
Registered: 09-2008
Posted on Monday, October 20, 2008 - 10:48 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

John, Those folding ladders of that brand are also very heavy and awkward to slide up the roof and into place since the legs stick out at an angle. This makes it harder to slide the ladder on its edge up the roof, and any of this added weight and awkwardness also adds to the danger when setting up. The bolted aluminum extension sections are the best solution I have seen so far. They are straight on the sides and weigh less than your folding model, making your setup safer and easier.
If there is a bow in your roof that makes the bottom of the ladder stick up, use a 2x4 or a 4x4 and slide it under the bottom so the ladder sits perfectly flat on the roof when you are climbing on it. Safety First..
The Slate Roof Bible has a great chapter on setting up ladders correctly and general safety rules to keep in mind when on a roof, I would read that if you already haven't. Safety First.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 328
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Monday, October 20, 2008 - 03:16 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We use a 20' hook ladder onto which we bolt an 8' aluminum ladder section when we have to access those long rafter areas. That give us a 28' hook ladder. We went to a metal fabricator and got aluminum plate that fit inside the side rails of the ladder. We had them drill four holes in the plates. We have 20' hook ladders and 8' hook ladders that are drilled with holes to accept the plates. We use stainless steel bolts to bolt the ladder sections together.

One thing to watch for when using a long hook ladder like that - if the roof is bowed convex, the bottom of the ladder will stick up off the roof and when you step on it, the top can pop off the ridge. This is common on barns, but not so common elsewhere.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kurtis Hord
Senior Member
Username: Kwhord

Post Number: 105
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Saturday, October 18, 2008 - 09:46 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Those things are great if you can find them, Slateaffair. There was a local retailer who was sued after an accident with that product and they no longer sell them here.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Slate Affair Inc.
Senior Member
Username: Slate_man

Post Number: 281
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Saturday, October 18, 2008 - 07:20 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

There a ladder out ther called a chicken ladder that comes in a number of pcs 6 feet long. Each section fits into the other with bolts, the top ladder has a build in hook that is a little different then the normal hook. This is thw way I would go, or install some roof brackets.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

David Spradlin
Advanced Member
Username: David_spradlin

Post Number: 43
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Friday, October 17, 2008 - 09:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have done it once or twice, but never as a primary source of security for myself. Both times were just to hold a LITTLE extra material. Every ladder hook I've seen is made to fit on a standard "D"-rung ladder, and I don't remember seeing any colapsables with these rungs, they're mostely squared so the hooks don't fit securely in my experience. Though I'm not familiar with the model your talking about.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kurtis Hord
Senior Member
Username: Kwhord

Post Number: 104
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Friday, October 17, 2008 - 08:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Don't do it.

Go to your local metal scrapyard and camp out for a few hours. At some point, someone will show up hoping to scrap an extension ladder that has been damaged. Offer to buy the ladder for the same price or slightly more than the scrap rate and use it for roof ladders. You can use aluminum plates and carriage bolts to connect multiple sections of ladders together.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Johanson
New member
Username: Jjohanson

Post Number: 1
Registered: 10-2008
Posted on Friday, October 17, 2008 - 12:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hello all, my first post to this message board. I'm enthralled such a resource exists!

I am dealing with a roof that has a ridge to eaves dimension from 22' - 28', which is way too long for me to use a section of my 32' extending ladder.

I was wondering what peoples thoughts were on using a folding ladder like the Louisville L-2094-22. I believe the hinges on these lock in both directions with solidity, and though there is a round hinge "bump" that extends on one side of the ladder, that could just face the sky to ensure it doesn't create a pivot point on a flat surface.

Has anyone used such a folding ladder with a roof hook?
Any experience, comments, recommendations?

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Program Credits Administration