Curved Eaves Log Out | Topics | Search
Moderators | Register | Edit Profile

Slate Roof Central Message Board » Slate Roofs » Curved Eaves « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Joe Jenkins (Joe)
Posted on Monday, July 17, 2006 - 11:49 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

John, Take a look at a similar situation dealt with by using a copper snow apron (http://www.slateroofcentral.com/install_snow_aprons.htm)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

timmyd
Posted on Tuesday, July 11, 2006 - 05:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

a picture would be useful,but i think he could have done a better job "gauging in" the courses,is it a curved eave?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Notch
Posted on Thursday, November 13, 2003 - 03:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am considering a slate roof on my 1912 Prairie style house. The roof currently has a kink or bend line 4' from the facia edge forming a curved eave because the original built-in gutters were removed and the roof reframed to keep the original wide eaves. 3/4" CDX plywood was used as the roof decking for the lower section with the original 1x10 decking still in place above the transition. The roof slope is approximately 22 degrees (5 in 12) on the lower portion and 30 degrees (7 in 12) in the upper.

Can a normal size slate (16" or 18" length)safely "negotiate" this curve or should only shorter lengths (12" or 10") be considered? Should the resulting gaps under the slates at the transition be shimmed or can the slate safely span its own length?

Is a 3" headlap sufficient for the lower portion or should 4" be used? Should the headlap be a constant value for the entire roof?

Am I nuts even to consider slate? With the roof slope relatively low, it will certainly be walked on. Can I expect many of the slates, especially, in the transition area for the curved eave, to be broken over time?

Any input will be appreciated.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

admin
Posted on Thursday, November 13, 2003 - 07:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Slate makes the best roof, but it shold not be walked on. You should increase the headlap at the curved eaves. It is not necessary to have the same headlap over the entire roof. You can negotiate the curve with standard length slates and you can put a furring strip under the gap if you want to increase your nailing ability. Shorter lengths at the curve will make a tighter, perhaps neater looking roof job (looking from the gable edge).
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Anonymous
Posted on Friday, November 14, 2003 - 12:01 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Start with 2 layers of 30# felt(slaters mastic between layers)or 1 layer of Ice & watersheild and 1 layer of 30# felt(I know the admin.does not endorse I&WS).The wide curved eaves hold a large amount of snow and Ice,it truly helps to have some sort of underlayment on these areas.You will have to do a lay out to figure out what size and quanity of slate you will need-Example-12"undereaver,row 1-18"slate,row 2-16"(layout line at 5 or 6")row 3-16"(layout line at 5 or 6")row 4-14"(layout line at 4 or 5")row 5-14"-Layout line 4 or 5")the next rows will step down to 12" & 10"L slate ect.You can adjust lay out lines for whatever headlap you feel is necessary for water tightness,instead of having the bottom of the 3rd row of slate overlap the top of the 1st row of slate by 4 or 5"-you can layout slate so the 4th row overlaps the 1st row by 2 or 3" for extra protection on this low sloped area.The closer you get to the transition area shorter slate are used to roll thru the transition,you will use quite a few more slate,so a dry layout should help you figure out what is needed,once thru the transition you can continue with a conventional 3" headlap..sort your slate and use the thickest slate you have for this area,You can use lath where needed, it helps for support of snow weight,leave gaps between lath for drainage of ice dam water.Also if lath is used near transition and is nailed use a dap of roof cement wher nail is going to penetrate felt.Breakage should not be a problem if you continue to use your thickest slate and the short exposure of slate seems to help increse tensile strength.Good luck,this detail looks great,go with slate if you can.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Notch
Posted on Friday, November 14, 2003 - 10:14 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thank you Admin and Anonymous for your input.

I have prepared a scale drawing of the roof at the curved eave location. Based upon your suggestions, this is what I've come up with:

First 7 rows are 16" slates with 4" headlap (6" exposure). This is because the 48" straight incline at 5 in 12.

Next 6 rows are 10" slates with 4" headlap (3" exposure). This is the curved area with the transition to 7 in 12. An alternate here would be to use 12" slates (I've been told that 10 slates are hard to get) at a greater headlap dimension.

Remainder of roof to ridge line are 16" slates with 3" headlap (6.5" exposure).

Ice and Water shield has already been applied to the lower 6" of the roof which covers all of the 5 in 12 portion and ends about 12" above the transition line.

What do you fellows think of this?

Please add a message.

Best regards,

John Notch
P.S. I live in the Chicago area and snow and ice are common.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

admin
Posted on Friday, November 14, 2003 - 01:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sounds workable. You shouldn't have any trouble getting 10' slates.

Since you already have a plywood deck at the eaves, the IWS is probably a good idea (to protect the plywood, albeit only temporarily). Most curved eaves are built with narrow boards (and felt) - a system that is tried and proven to last the centuries required for a slate roof. No water should penetrate the slate roof system, hence the minimal importance of the underlayment when longer-lasting boards are used and the slate is properly installed. Don't let people walk on the roof - that's what typically damages curved eaves. We often work on curved eaves that have been damaged by foot traffic. These are usually a century old and have no effective underlayment, yet do not leak if the slates are in good repair, ice and snow or no ice and snow.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Anonymous
Posted on Friday, November 14, 2003 - 07:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Leaks-Snow and Ice dams-Slate roofs-Shingle roofs-do leak when Mother nature decides to dump 6-12" of snow-below 32 degrees at nite-daytime temps hover a little above freezing with some sun,A little more snow ,slight thawing thru the day,below freezing at nite ect..I went out on a call last winter,the leak was 12'up the roof from the gutter,the snow had melted to this point(No snow above 12',dry roof)the roof was dripping thru the tongue and groove boards about 2'below the snow line of this drive thru porch area ,the ceiling was exposed timbers ect.a non heated roof space,newer slate roof 18" random ,3" headlap-good sidelap,with a good base sheet,no tears ect.,no nail penetration of T&G,no penetrations such as vent pipes ect.,9/12 pitch with a rolled transition 4' from gutter-this is why the snow was backed up so far on the roof,the rolled area was not leaking,the solution was to shovel off the roof-stopped the leak-have checked this roof thru heavy rains and it does not leak.How was this roof leaking-it had to be a dam and the water had to be be coming thru where the copper nails penetrated the base sheet?.Ice and snow dams in conjunction with Mother nature cause water to be pushed under slate past their side and headlap-even on properly installed roofs.Some winters this may not occur,the conditions dictate.I know of a roofing co.that several years ago when the weather conditions were right recieved over 900 calls in one week for ice dam related leaks a week later the phones were dead after a thaw cycle.I have been out on many winter time leaks-shoveled snow-picked ice dams-and most of these roofs did not leak when it rains.I believe the New England states have eliminated Gutters and install a wide sheet of metal to deter ice dams.I have 20 some years on slate roofs and I just try to learn from my daily experiences and improve upon my workmanship to install a leak proof roof-though Mother nature has other ideas.The National Roofers Handbook,The SR bible and other recent publications have also helped.Yes I have been on many old slate roofs and it is true most of them do not leak even without a good base sheet-no base sheet-dry valleys(no roof cement on edges)have even seen roofs with slate missing with no apparent leak?I just feel one should reframe from using the word never-especially when dealing with a trade that is exposed to all Mother nature(and architects (HA) has to offer.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

admin
Posted on Saturday, November 15, 2003 - 02:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The broader issue is the insistence that the underlayment is critical to a slate roof. The suggestion is that a slate roof will leak without proper underlayment. Or that it will leak sometimes, under the right conditions, without serious underlayment protection. Yet, a good slate roof will last 150 years or more, which is much longer than any underlayment material. In effect, dependence on underlayment is the same as saying the effectiveness of a slate roof will only last as long as the underlayment, meaning that slate, as a roofing material, is not better than whatever underlayment one installs. This is all incorrect. A properly installed slate roof, underlayment or no underlayment, will not leak, no matter how much ice and snow is piled on top of it, and remain non-leaking for 150 years or longer with proper maintenance.

When you found the leak on the drive through porch area, 12' from the gutter, you were probably in no position to examine that spot closely (due to ice and snow). And I'm willing to guess that it was a *spot* and not the entire width of the roof (which should occur if it was a design problem or headlap problem, etc. and the ice dam was located across the entire roof, which is likely). So I would be willing to bet that if you went back there and looked closely at the spot where the water was penetrating during the ice dam, you will find a fault in the roof, probably a slate that was cracked during the installation. That what I have found in every ice dam leak I have ever had to repair. It doesn't take much of a fault to leak during ice dam conditions, so you may have to look real close. If there is something wrong with the roof, an ice dam will find it. The solution is not to rely on the underlayment, but to repair the roof. In ice dam prone situations (curved eaves in the northeast, for example) increase the headlap and build the roof to last a century or two. We have a lot of 100 year old curved eaves here in western PA, and a lot of ice damming. They will leak when they have been damaged, they will not leak otherwise, if properly installed.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Walter Musson
Posted on Saturday, November 15, 2003 - 07:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ice dam back up can certainly penetrate underneath the slates even with a 3" or 4" headlap and then find a crack in the sheathing or gap and come into the building.In the Northeast we use metal at the eaves to prevent this occurance,a practice which goes back over a hundred years.These old roofers knew that slate alone couldn't hold out water traveling backwards up the roof during certain ice conditions.Instead of fighting Nature they did what they had to to ensure the integrity of the homes interior.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Anonymous
Posted on Saturday, November 15, 2003 - 10:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Slate roofs do leak sometimes under the right weather conditions-with or without underlayment-I have seen it, on properly installed roofs(no cracked or broken slate-good side and headlap)We were right on top of the leak(ladder hooks)even pulled a few slate,truly could not see anything wrong,just a perfect Ice dam .One could install a EPDM roof system over the slate roof,this would stop ice dams from backing up under the slate-Just joking-Increased headlap may help,but will not solve the problem-plus you can not increase your side lap-A shovel and ice pick will stop the leak -When the ice dams occur and the roof has no underlayment or underlayment that has been burnt out from years of service the sheathing spaces are exposed for direct entry of water.Underlayment installed properly can help prevent ice dam water from entering the living space,even if the underlayment survies 10 or 20 years, in todays world whatever may help eliminate any water entry should be installed-Insurance Companys and people looking for any reason to file suit are a good reason for doing so.Plus the cost of water damage can be staggering.The people who developed I&WS,I feel were trying to help solve this problem as with any new product actual field use will help them solve any faults the product may have,plus I think they drove thru the New England States and said"Dam these roofs would look a lot better with all slate,How can we eliminate that metal flashing at the eaves?"Insurance and Liability are a major concern for all Roofers one serious leak can put you out of business,We are not working on to many $15,000 farm houses any more,Most customers will not tolerate water entry for any reason-Act of God included-This is what drives me to install a good underlayment system when installing a new or salvaged slate roof,You do what you can to eliminate a call back. Underlayment is truly not needed on a slate roof to assure that a slate roof will not leak when properly installed,My house has no felt,no snow gaurds,gutter edge below the roof line,the snow comes off in a hurry-no leaks for many many years,but roofs that do hold snow a good underlayment is a plus.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Notch
Posted on Saturday, November 15, 2003 - 11:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I would like to steer this discussion back to the issue of a curved eave and the likelihood of slate breakage at the bend transition. Can a 12" slate survive without breaking if it is spanning its full 12" length and someone steps on it (whether during construction or later in service) in the middle? What is the convential wisdom within the slating community?

I also have read the discussion about avoiding plywood decks under slate roofs. Even though I am a structural engineer, I never have heard of any problems regarding plywood decks delaminating. It seems to me that if plywood is kept dry that there should not be problem in it lasting a long, long time. I see no reason why plywood couldn't form a good base for a slate roof. Please comment.

What should be the design life for a slate roof or a house in a metropolitan area anyway? Where I live in the Chicago suburbs, older houses are being torn down and new larger houses being rebuilt in its place. How long will my 1912 house be around and should I be worrying about being a purist and only put a slate roof over green lumber? I say, if I want a slate roof and am willing to pay for it, why not do it!!! I am reminded of the old saying, "In the long run, we are all dead".
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Walter Musson
Posted on Sunday, November 16, 2003 - 08:13 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

John,
I would suggest using a dry mock up as the annymous gent suggested so that you can determine how thick a spacer you should have under each course of slate thru that transition.I have seen some where the slates were shorter than normal for their exposure with an 8" strip of copper which can conform to the curve,acting as the headlap.Just for those few courses where the most extreme curve is.
Try it yourself to see how the shorter slate holds yhe curve better.
As mentioned prior I don't like the looks of such short exposures as you had suggested .I think that would look choppy.Have you thought of using copper or lead coated in a standing seam at the curved eaves?
That might solve several issues for you,future breakage from unanticipated traffic,back up problems,and might even be more aesthetically appealing than slates of varying exposures.By all means use slate for the roof,since even after you're gone someone will salvage it prior to the wrecking ball hitting the house.
Since plywood is already there I don't see any reason to replace it,even though boards probably last longer.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Anonymous
Posted on Sunday, November 16, 2003 - 10:38 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Sorry got a little carried away-just trying to spice up this web site-Install slate on your curved eave you really should have no problem with breakage especially with the shorter slate and lath support under any large voids.some breakage may occur doing the life of the roof,you just have to maintain your roof and it will last the rest of your life and the next owner as well(providing a s-1 slate is used).Plywood is not a problem especially 3/4",I know of plywood decks that are 40+ years old and are in great shape no reason why they would not last another 40 years or longer as long as a good roof covers it.Yes we all do have death in common-So go for it.Good luck and may we all enjoy our days that we have left upon this wonderful earth.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

admin
Posted on Sunday, November 16, 2003 - 11:22 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Regarding the 12" slates and the ability to withstand foot traffic, I think you're making a mistake in thinking that the roof should be designed to carry the weight of someone walking on it. It is a roof after all and not a floor. There is nothing you can do to a slate roof to make it walkable. A slate *can* break or crack if you lay it flat on concrete and step on it. The slates are meant for roofing material, not flooring. If the roof requires work later, a competent slater can access it without having to walk on it (or, if he does walk on it, he will repair anything he may break).

We recently repaired a slated curved eave on a garage. We had to replace 30 slates in one area because someone had used that area to access the roof, and walked on it. This, by the way, was the only spot on the curved eaves that leaked. This is a 90 year old roof, virtually no underlayment, on boards. We had the worst ice damming I have ever seen last winter here in western PA. The only place the curved eaves leaked was at the spot where slates were broken. [By the way, we did not install underlayment in the repaired area.]

I might add that *if* slate roofs allow water to penetrate through three inches of headlap on a properly sloped roof, *then* virtually all slate roofs would have leaked in their lifetimes. This is not the case. In fact, slate roof systems have been developed over a period of hundreds of years. Problems with installation procedures have been worked out. Current, traditional installation procedures work just fine. If not, we would change them. The world hasn't been waiting for self-adhesive underlayment to be invented so that slate roofs would stop leaking. By the way, we recently re-roofed a Cathedral in Little Rock, Arkansas (I was the conultant on the project). You can see it at http://www.jenkinsslate.com/photos_consulting.htm.
It had no underlayment at all, according to the crew that removed the original 123 year old roof. [Nor do virtually all slated barns. They do not leak either, even after 100 years. If they did, I would be called.]

I might add that I have been working on slate roofs since 1968 and have easily worked on 1,000 of them. I have installed quite a few of them new. I have never used a square inch of self-sdhesive underlayment and have never had a call-back on account of a leak due to a lack of underlayment (we use 30# felt under new installations, no underlayment at all during restoration of old roofs). I have never used *any* underlayment under valleys when I replace them, or under any flashings when replacing them. How is the water going to get through the flashing?? It isn't. If it does, then I installed it incorrectly.

On the other hand, if I were using plywood decking (which I don't), then self-adhesive underlayment is probably a good idea. I believe that's what it was designed for (protecting plywood from delaminating). And yes, I have seen delaminating plywood and punky plywood - a huge pain for future slate roof restoration professionals to deal with. I don't envy my son and step son who may have to deal with such roofs in the future (or their sons).We are already having to deal with new slate roofs improperly installed (hundreds of broken slates, and yes, all installed on plywood decks).

Sure, you can get a lot of years out of 3/4" plywood. But can you get as many years out of the plywood as you can get from the slate itself? That is the question, and my gut feeling is, "I doubt it." To me the issue is moot when alternatives that are tried and proven are readily available, less expensive, and known to have the longevity that approaches or exceeds slate.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

John Notch
Posted on Tuesday, November 18, 2003 - 04:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

These are all very good ideas.

Based upon the above input, I now have altered my plan to the following:

1. A 4' section of lead-coated standing seam roof will be installed on the eave portion of the roof below the bend line around the perimeter of the roof.
2. The top flashing for the standing seam roof will negotiate the bend and continue up the steeper portion of the roof.
3. The first row of slates will be installed above the bend line and have a constant pitch up to the hip and ridge lines. Because of the steeper and constant pitch, longer slates will be able to be utilized with a 3" headlap.

This really is a good idea as it does not expose any of the lower slates to unnecessary breakage. The standing seam roof will allow for very good drainage at the lower slope portion (minimizing ice dams?) and the perimeter of the roof could now be accessed (on the standing seam portion) for the infrequent gutter cleaning or etc, without walking on any slates.

Thanks for all your suggestions.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Walter Musson
Posted on Tuesday, November 18, 2003 - 07:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

John,
I think you have made a well thought out choice which will be aesthetically pleasing and solve most of your concerns.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Anonymous
Posted on Tuesday, November 18, 2003 - 07:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I AGREE.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Walter Musson
Posted on Wednesday, November 19, 2003 - 06:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Anonymous: E-mail me if you would like to discuss some roofing thoughts.You have very similar work ethic and ideas about slating in the Northeast.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

slateworks
Posted on Sunday, November 23, 2003 - 07:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Walter,Joe & John,The roof that leaked during the Ice dam was on a roof we installed last year-180sq,18"x R,Heavy slate.Beautiful slate.The carpenters had installed a heavy type felt on the main roof and I&WS on the curved eaves(350')very low pitch this is where we had the bottom of the 4th row lap the top of the 1st row by an 1" or 2",Roof deck 3/4" plywood,curved eaves were 1"x 4",T & G cedar for all soffits and exposed ceilings.We had tons of snow last winter and I was doing some finish work and walked under the drive thru area and noticed some drips coming thru the T & G 12' up the roof,If anything I thought the curved area should of leaked(hopefully not)I checked for cracked and broken slate,everything looked good,checked for leaks when it is was raining-no leaks.That was during one of the last snow storms,Just have to see what happens this winter.I have to say that I do use felts and I&WS when installing new or salvaged roofs,we do install over alot of plywood most of these roofs are already built by the time we get there,I must say we have had no problems with slate installed over plywood.The slate may out last the plywood I really do not know.. I do admire Joe for is ecological and Traditional workmanship,He also lives his life in the same manner.I really did not use any I&WS for a long time,I tried it on a Ice dam leak and That roof has not leaked since,so I got sucked in to using it when I feel the roof may have a damming problem.It is going to be hell trying to remove that stuff when the time comes,I believe wood and all will have to be removed,but if the roof stays dry may be able to install a new roof right over it? Take care all. Ron
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Wally J. Corpse
Posted on Saturday, September 10, 2005 - 12:35 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Greetings, Mr. John Notch-

Curved eaves, you say? No problem. Slates can be crafted to fit any contour of substrate if you adhere to the following guidelines- even the challenging rolled eaves and rakes of a "gingerbread house" traditionally destined for wood shingles can be slated. First, some basic math is involved in the layout. One must calculate the arc of radius desired, and cypher into it the needed headlap. Often times a pencil and some paper is useful, if no neighborhood pocket protector clad pre-teen math geek kid is available. Once a plan has been somewhat formulated, the next step is the most closely guarded secret of the slater's trade- the bending of the slate itself. There are many methods to choose and reject from, but the one that works the best is thus: Prepare several clean, yet empty 55 gallon drums made out of heat resistant metal. Arrange slates to be bent inside drums, allowing space for the liquid key ingredient to circulate. Heat from outside using combustible materials, or flammable gaseous vapors. Once metal container begins to glow a light orangey color, pour in 5 gallons of unobtainium, and stir until stirring technichian reaches self awareness level of futile action, or until second shift of disposable assistants arrives. Repeat action until all actual slate roofers have chuckled themselves out. Apply slate while still hot. Any slates that break during application can be repaired with invisible putty, blends right in.

Always here to help...

AS ever,

Your ol' pal,

Wally J. Corpse
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

admin
Posted on Saturday, September 10, 2005 - 11:57 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Clever.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Raymond Brummel
Posted on Sunday, June 18, 2006 - 08:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The best underlayment I have used is Versa-Base, it has a 5 yr warranty once it is installed and seals around the nails. I would use this for the roof as it is the only one we use and have had no issues, I just feel that if your going to buy something permenant then you will want to use an underlayment that will last much longer than the others.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Anonymous
Posted on Monday, June 19, 2006 - 06:22 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

GRACE is the best we ever used. Never seen Versa-Base or even heard of it. But, it would have to be real good to be as good as GRACE. I'd like to learn more on this product, I will be visiting my local roofing distributor today and I will inquire about this product. And what it's best use is. Thanks for the info.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

claude holmes (Claude)
Posted on Monday, July 10, 2006 - 10:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

re.layout questions,client has new construction roof,with an approx7/12 slope of 43 inches,from the roof edge to the transition,which is approx 14/12,of approx. 12 ft.my slater laid out 3 courses of 18"at 71/2" ,with 4 courses of 12" slate at 4" exposure.
this layout followed the transition well,however the owner wants it to look uniform,and wants to use a small exposure,5" max.any ideas on this?
i will try to post a pic.but not sure where to post it.thanks
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Joe Jenkins (Joe)
Posted on Tuesday, July 11, 2006 - 01:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You would have to use a 12" long slate on the entire roof in order to get a similar exposure (i.e. 4.5" exposure in the field of the roof and 4" exposure on the eaves). This will run your labor cost way up, since there are a lot more slates to install in a square of 12" slates than in a square of 18" slates.

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Program Credits Administration