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Jeffrey C Stone
Junior Member
Username: Shrllc

Post Number: 17
Registered: 12-2008
Posted on Tuesday, December 30, 2008 - 06:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I believe in Stortz products all the way. I have found the knurled hammer face works very well to trim down the edge of a shingle which was cut just a little too wide. Tap, tap, tap along the back face and it provides the beveled edge we desire. The recessed cutout on the estwing is as others pointed out, for holding a nail; I have little experience with this brand of slate hammer. Joe mentions that they have magnets available, to hold the nail for you, The head on a roofing nail is too large for the opening; additionally here we only use copper slating nails, so not to take a chance with any conflicting corrosion between metals. The copper nails are obviously non-magnetic which would prohibit the use of a magnet even if the head fit in the cut out.
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Roland Graham
New member
Username: Rollythegoalie

Post Number: 8
Registered: 09-2008
Posted on Thursday, October 02, 2008 - 09:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks for the slate hammer information!
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Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 327
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Thursday, October 02, 2008 - 06:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

First off, you can't punch holes with a hammer in small pieces of slate. You have to punch the hole first, then cut the slate, or else use a slate cutter with a hole punch to punch holes in smaller slates.

The hole in the top of the hammer is for a magnet. We opt to buy them without the magnet because you don't really need them when doing roofing and they raise the price of the hammer. The magnet is supposed to hold a nail in place while you drive it with one hand. It doesn't work for roofing nails because the heads are too big.

The hammers are, or were, made in the USA. They just ceased manufacturing them, probably because of a lack of market.

The cross-hatch face is a style common to Estwing hammers. Eric did a good job of explaining why.

The nail punch video can be seen here: http://josephjenkins.com/store/product.php?productid=16246&cat=253&page=1
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Eric Braymer
New member
Username: Braymer

Post Number: 3
Registered: 09-2008
Posted on Thursday, October 02, 2008 - 05:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You dont have to hit the slate very hard at all-Especially with a heavy hammer like the Estwing. The weight of the hammer does most of the punching, you dont want to knock it all the way through, only enough so the rock kind of crumbles away on the face side. Then you pick at the face side alittle with the point to knock away the loose stuff and it makes a good countersink for the nail head. There is a link here somewhere of Joe Jenkins doing a great demonstration of punching a hole with the Estwing, watch and listen to that real close. Here is alink >> http://www.slateroofcentral.com/index.html << then go to the how to drop down and select tool videos and hit punching a hole with slate hammer.

The waffle pattern on the head I believe is for some added traction on the striking face so there are fewer false or sideways hits on the first few strokes that sometimes bend the nail. This pattern is also on my big Estwing 30 oz. framing hammer, they call it a "milled face". The recessed cutout is for placing a nail and setting it with the first hit without holding the nail, although I think this does not hold our slate roofing nails since the heads are too big. These hammers are from England or somewhere in Europe, so the roofing nail heads over there may differ from region to region. I love the hammer - I recently bought one too. Watch that video of Joe and or ask some of these experts here and they will set you straight. Just dont hit it so hard! Cheers and fast healing.
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Roland Graham
New member
Username: Rollythegoalie

Post Number: 7
Registered: 09-2008
Posted on Thursday, October 02, 2008 - 12:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Take it from a true novice to the world of slating..."Use a large piece of slate when practicing making nail holes with a slate hammer". (My new Estwing slate hammer made a nice gash in the meat of my palm while practicing making nail holes with too small a piece of slate.)

While you're laughing at me, I have a couple of questions about my new Estwing Slate Hammer: 1) Why is the striking face of the hammer knurled? 2) What is the cutout on the top of the Estwing hammer used for? (It has a recessed cutout in the shape of a nail.) Thanks

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