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Andy Sorrell
Posted on Thursday, October 09, 2003 - 11:27 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have an old home I will be restoring that makes use of a saddle ridge. After reading the "S.R. Bible" I still have questions on how to make the ridge apex watertight where the two roof planes intersect to form the ridge. It seems that when originally laid, one plane of the saddle slates projected 1/2 inch over the other plane, and that was what kept the water out. Is this what is still done on saddle ridges today? Should I use the 50 yr silicon where the 2 planes meet? Thanks ahead of time for any advice provided! -- Andy Sorrell
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Walter Musson
Posted on Thursday, October 09, 2003 - 07:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If you need to keep the ridge a saddle ridge for restoration purposes then the long term solution would be to pull them off and relay them with step flashings laid with each pair of slates.You then would not need to project one out beyond the other.This would be the most labor intensive but a repair which would last possibly the longest.You might also want to replace the board which they are fastened to since if it hasn't been watertight then it may have deteriorated.
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Andy Sorrell
Posted on Friday, October 10, 2003 - 08:30 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Walter,

Thank you for the advice. I am somewhat confused about how step flashing would be used. I understand its use around a chimney, but how would it be used in this application? Perhaps you mean a piece of flashing that folds along the ridgeline that is installed before the saddle slates? If so, would the overlap of the copper need to be over 2"? I appreciate all your help! -- Andy
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Walter Musson
Posted on Friday, October 10, 2003 - 09:48 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yes,thats exactly how it would work.Sometimes you see a single piece of metal used which is o.k., but the flashing with each pair is the longest lasting and best but also more labor intensive.

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