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Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 102
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Tuesday, March 31, 2009 - 07:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Chris and Kword. If you make the pieces from the template, BEFORE you try and bend them up at a 90 degree angle, send them through a roller so that they want to roll up by themselves. When you bend the sides up, the panel will want to stay in the rolled up mode and most of your work will be done for you already. You will need a roller to make the battens anyway. When you shear the pieces for the battens, cut them to length and then fold them in half. Cut an extra piece and put it between the two sides before you roll them. That will make it easier to slide them over the two raised sides of the panel. When you take out the filler piece, it leaves a gap. The higher you make the "legs" of the panel, the harder it is going to be to stretch them. Good luck. We can talk about this and many other things in Frankfort. Looking forward to the seminar.
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Plaughlin1 (Plaughlin1)
Intermediate Member
Username: Plaughlin1

Post Number: 31
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Tuesday, March 31, 2009 - 08:20 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Old School, that is almost exacly how i did it, except once you bend up the sides of the panel for the seams you have to strech them to get the correct radius.that was the part that took alot of time.
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Kwhord (Kwhord)
Senior Member
Username: Kwhord

Post Number: 197
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Monday, March 30, 2009 - 10:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I like the aluminum idea. I might use that for a tapered barrel vault that we are doing soon.
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Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 101
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Monday, March 30, 2009 - 10:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Kurtis, you would still have to make a template for the small diamond shaped tiles. They have to get smaller as they go up the roof. This template would do it if you marked horizontal lines on it before you took it down. Each piece is one section of the pie.!
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Old_school (Old_school)
Senior Member
Username: Old_school

Post Number: 99
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Sunday, March 29, 2009 - 07:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

This is the first time I looked back at this one. This is quite a bit like roofing a cone in that you have to determine the widest piece you will be using to start with. In working with metal, I would determine the perimeter measurement first and then divide that up in even increments. A pair of dividers will help to make the final precise measurements. If you get to the last panel and it is close, you may have to custome make the last one to fit.

As far as getting a straight line from the center point to the bottom panel, I would just mark the even increments around the bottom and then just take a piece of flat aluminum ( a narrow roll will do); tack it on the top with one edge butting to the center point and then stretch it so it lies flat on the roof and it touches the line along the bottom perimeter. Then, just mark the edge with a pencil. Move the bottom to the next mark and make another pencil line. The shape between the lines is your template. Another short cut would be to tack a piece of felt to the roof and then lay the straight edge aluminum over it and instead of marking it with a pencil, just cut along the edge of the aluminum with a knife. Presto!, a template. Lay the template on your finished metal and take a scribe and mark the base metal with a scribe 1 inch wider on both sides. Bend them up at a ninety degree angle and install them on the roof. You will have to make batten caps to go over them, but that is easy as they will be straight pieces of metal. Try it!
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Tim Dittmar
New member
Username: Tim_dittmar

Post Number: 7
Registered: 05-2008
Posted on Monday, June 23, 2008 - 10:40 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Peter- your work looks great! From your description of difficulties, you must have alot of craftsmanship in your blood. The interval of standing seams on the dome scales well with the ribs on the lower roof and the patina that may come to your work might do quite well with the green enamel? ! For your radius line, my first thought was to run/jig a horizontal straightedge off the very point of the dome and any plumbed lines from it should give you points on the dome to connect and describe a straight line that's also hopefully square with the bulk of the work(depending on the dedication/craft of those before/around you)
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Kurtis Hord
Senior Member
Username: Kwhord

Post Number: 56
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Sunday, June 22, 2008 - 02:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I would have used small diamond-shaped panels instead of standing seam. That is the more traditional way to cover a dome. Sounds like you got it under control though. Are those copper, or copper-colored galvalume?
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Peter
Junior Member
Username: Plaughlin1

Post Number: 17
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Sunday, June 22, 2008 - 12:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I installed these metal panels on the dome - someone else made the template & fabricated the panels.
Unfortunatly none of them fit , so i had to re fab them all.
What is the easiest way to make a good template that will work all the way around for a dome?
To remake them i measured around the eave then divieded that number by the number of panels to install, then went up to the top center point & scribed a line from the top center to the edge of where a panel would sit.
Esablishing a line on the radius dome deck way VERY difficult, any suggestions for how to do the next one???
THanks - Peter

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