Main Ridge Caps- Necessary? Log Out | Topics | Search
Moderators | Register | Edit Profile

Slate Roof Central Message Board » Slate Roofs » Main Ridge Caps- Necessary? « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Ward Hamilton
Intermediate Member
Username: Olde_mohawk_masonry__historic_restoration

Post Number: 34
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Saturday, June 21, 2008 - 03:24 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Screws aren't necessarily bad ... it depends on the application, like anything else. When we worked on an 1880's Queen Ann Victorian north of Boston, we encountered brass screws that had been used to fasten the relatively ornamental copper ridge pieces. Guess what? We were actually able to unscrew the pieces and remove them. No prying or wiggling out nails! And when we replace the cornice/decorative woodwork and moldings of a built-in gutter system we always use stainless steel trim screws instead of finish nails.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Tim Dittmar
New member
Username: Tim_dittmar

Post Number: 6
Registered: 05-2008
Posted on Friday, June 20, 2008 - 12:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Kurtis- nice to hear from you .. yes, I did leave the screw advice somewhat unqualified- limitations of one sort or another? rust? use s/s screws, or bronze, cu alloy, dbl hot dips but try to do the best one can w/ electrolysis issues to not rot a hole in the ridgecap, etc. drywall screws are an example of modern design where the screw isn't tapered(unwedge-like) and the high gain thread is to aid speed and retard stripping- other screw products with these features come w/ different heads to suit a need and can be augmented w/ washers ... often we slaters are working at pres./rest with olde, sun-baked, brittle, easily split wood decks and sometimes seek to fasten into a relatively short board on a hip- nailing w/o a pilot hole can often be destructive in this scenario and make the next attempt even harder- additionally, w/ a screw one can "sense" the integrity of the nailer(r'caps can often be fastened into hip rafters if the fastener is long enough) and the level of success to a good degree and the feeling that comes with good quality long-cycle roofing repair- alot of the screws I placed were to make up for a failed nail or two and hoping to improve things before wind might destroy the antique ridgecap- pres./rest work in particular/general involving re-fastening virtually demands pilot-holing to ease the fastener in order to avoid the risk of damaging the resource- excellence can often be demanding and I empathize with your feelings about the damage you've seen- perhaps we can proceed at greater length by phone or ? and not use too much of Joe's dime- take care ..
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kurtis Hord
Senior Member
Username: Kwhord

Post Number: 55
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Thursday, June 19, 2008 - 11:44 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Tim, I don't like screws on anything. The right nails strategically placed will be sufficient. The problem with screws is one they rust out or strip, more damage is done to remove them than if a nail had been used. I really really hate it when painters and repair people use wood screws on old decorative cornice trim. You can never get them out without damaging the priceless molding. This is a real big problem on the corners of old molding. Screws are for decks, and door hardware.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Tim Dittmar
New member
Username: Tim_dittmar

Post Number: 5
Registered: 05-2008
Posted on Wednesday, June 18, 2008 - 12:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

slated hips and ridges can be difficult to keep functional and visually intact- ropes, ladder hooks, tree branches, and people seeking access by "walking the ridge" can easily damage this treatment- esp. if not installed with the ultimate in craftmanship/experience- some install it anyway for tradition and appearance- it is vital to flash under or in it so that casual damage will not allow water to begin to attack roof deck integrity, loosen nails and begin a shedding of slates- the ridging slates are not nailed as others(if one intends to conceal the nails) so they tend to twist out of location over time even if not molested- cementing them in place creates its own set of problems- any repair work in the immediate ridge area is complicated if disassembly of the ridge is difficult, Metal ridgecaps are a much more cost-effective way to tightly weatherize a hip/ridge treatment- install them with screws for them to stay "tight" and still allow for repairwork. A wood form inside the ridge iron helps to keep the "ridge-walkers" from being as much of a worry of collapsing ridgecap.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 304
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Tuesday, June 17, 2008 - 08:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We sell copper ridge for $8.65 a lineal foot, but only in 100' lots.

http://josephjenkins.com/store/product.php?productid=16203&cat=271&page=1
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kurtis Hord
Senior Member
Username: Kwhord

Post Number: 54
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Tuesday, June 17, 2008 - 06:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

"Ridge iron" is the easiest way to finish for sure!
I've never done a mitered hip, but I imagine that would be the hardest to execute. Nothing but metal ridges on these old Victorians here.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

David Spradlin
Intermediate Member
Username: David_spradlin

Post Number: 37
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Tuesday, June 17, 2008 - 09:42 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Copper will need to be installed at the ridge in one form or another, whether with ridge iron on top of the field slate, or as step flashing undernieth the mitered slate or saddle ridges. I have not used ridge iron, but would think it would be a little less labor intensive, and therefore a little cheaper. You may even use less copper because you don't have the lapping factor when using iron. Maybe somebody else, with more experience installing ridge iron, could confirm this theory, but it makes sense to me. I think the "adamant" roofer may be trying to short change you if theres no copper being included in his bid for use at the ridge detail.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Slate Affair Inc.
Senior Member
Username: Slate_man

Post Number: 250
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Monday, June 16, 2008 - 05:21 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

All roofs need a cap, it can be made from slate but with copper under it, hidden from site. Or you can install just copper.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Stauckus
New member
Username: Slatequestion

Post Number: 1
Registered: 06-2008
Posted on Sunday, June 15, 2008 - 06:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We are doing a renovation on our house and need a new slate roof. The roof is original slate form 1937. WE have met with 4 roofing contractors who are pushing using Vermont black or multicolored due to the high cost now of North slate. Is that true??
Our main question is one about ridge capping. Two of the roofers said that we need to place a copper strip (cap) on the tip ridge to prevent leaking once the roof is finished. Another one was adamant that the cap is not necessary and is only a way of other roofers to charge for extra cost and to add to the "aesthetics" of the roof . Due to it being copper, it's a big expense.
Given the cost of the project and new roof, we want to do what is right to prevent leaking but also don't want to pay for an item that is not "neceessary". I dont' know if this roofer is applying copper falshing underneath the ridge line. Would that matter or prevent the need for a cap on the ouside?

Thankyou!

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Program Credits Administration