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Jim Korczak
Junior Member
Username: Jim_k_in_pa

Post Number: 17
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Wednesday, May 21, 2008 - 10:43 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Thanks Tim, I will. I have another 2-4 squares to lay up this summer on some out buildings. Then next year the barn gets done with PB (another 15-18 sq.).
Jim K in PA
www.pennbrookfarm.com
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Tim Dittmar
New member
Username: Tim_dittmar

Post Number: 4
Registered: 05-2008
Posted on Saturday, May 17, 2008 - 11:34 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Jim, get a professional roofer's pad (for your azz- protects your jeans, too and is non-skid)
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Jim Korczak
Junior Member
Username: Jim_k_in_pa

Post Number: 15
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Tuesday, May 13, 2008 - 12:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Slateaffair - thanks for the input. I enjoy engineering my own solutions, but will look at that system for potential ideas.

Joe - I installed all of the 16+ squares of the VAB on my roof, and certainly appreciate how damned hot the slate gets from the direct heating. I literally burned my azz through a hole in my jeans I did not know about - until I sat on the slate.

Some pics are at http://www.pennbrookfarm.com/Chronicles906.html


I plan to take some temp readings this summer under the slate to see what temps actually get to in the attic space, adjacent to the slate.

My best southern exposure roof section is shaded by a large silver maple, so I will have to use other sections of the roof that also get plenty of sun. Most of my roof is fully visible, so I was trying to come up with a system installed under the roof for aesthetic reasons.

If I can get some UV stable piping of smaller diameter (8-10mm), I may be able to hang it across the roof at the lower edges of the slate.

I'll come up with something. I also have to consider what to do with excess heat if I am TOO successful.


(BTW - the free beer was a solicitation, not an offer . . . ;~) )
Jim K in PA
www.pennbrookfarm.com
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Slate Affair Inc.
Senior Member
Username: Slate_man

Post Number: 243
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Tuesday, May 13, 2008 - 05:00 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Hi Jim, I am going to be installing a Solar hot water system under a standing seam roof. Its under the roofing not in the attic space. Dawn Solar make the system and have in adapted to slate too. You have to install it on the out side of the roof deck when you install the roof over it. I can see your idea and that it can work if you do it rigth. You can use the heat that in the attic by circulate the hot air in to the Dawn Solar system. The hot air is what heat the water/glycol mix which will be less then you think in the attic that why they install it on the out side. They also have you install a foil faced insulation about 1/4' thick. The tubing is installed inside steel tracks. They are developing a air circulater for the systm. Other cool think you can do is reverse the flow in the winter to pervent icing, but heating the system.
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Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 285
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Monday, May 12, 2008 - 11:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'll take the free beer.

Most of the heat on a slate roof is on the outside, not underneath the sheathing, as anyone who works on slate roofs knows. I have recorded 135 degrees F on the surface of a slate roof while working on it. I asked the homeowner - a farm lady - for a candy thermometer from her kitchen and I set it on the roof propped on a piece of bib flashing I slid under a slate as a prop. This was on a summer day. The thermometer read 135 F.

There is certainly heat to capture. How about a black hose or tubing laid on the outside of the roof on a south exposure where no one can see it (if that's an option)?
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Jim Korczak
Junior Member
Username: Jim_k_in_pa

Post Number: 13
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Monday, May 12, 2008 - 01:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I know this is really not a slate roofing question, but hopefully someone with a slate roof has attempted what I want to do.

My roof: VA Buckingham - ~18 sq.
My challenge: install a passive solar collection system UNDER the slate roof

OK - if anyone has not yet fallen out of their chair laughing, here is my idea. I am looking for feedback and/or alternative designs.

The idea is to gather heat during the day from the substantial thermal load buildup inside the attic for use in domestic hot water (DHW) heating. I would like to install a series of loops of heat collectors under the sheathing. The 3x6 rafter are 24" on center and the 9x18 slate is installed on 1x4 purlins spaced 7.5" on center (there is open space between the purlins). I would circulate a water/glycol mix through the tubing, and then to/from the basement. In the basement, my hot water furnace supplies my DHW via a coil in the water jacket. I would buy/build a water:water exchanger to pre-heat the potable water before it goes into the furnace.

Given the lack of adequate heating during the winter months, the glycol would prevent freezing. The system would only be used during the summer, or whenever the collector water temps exceeded 90 degrees or so. I would control the circulating pump with an aquastat in the line collector line.

Comments, criticisms and free beer are welcome.
Jim K in PA
www.pennbrookfarm.com

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