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Jack Robinson
New member
Username: Jack_robinson

Post Number: 4
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Tuesday, April 08, 2008 - 05:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Regarding Slate Roof Insulation:
I have read various ideas & solutions to venting a slate roof & I am still a little confused. We are renovating an existing building with a slate roof. (Yes, I am still fighting with the powers that be to maintain our existing slate roof in Oakland). There are large existing roof vents near the ridge but nothing near the eaves. The roof rafters will be insulated with 2" of air space above the insulation & below the 1x6 roof decking.
I have read that a slate roof, installed on 1x6 boards will breathe
but I cannot locate any technical information to satisfy a building inspector. We have to comply with the 1/300 roof ventilation code, 50% above & 50% below. I have found information on this message board about SmartVent & have read (dated 2005) of its use with slate roofs. Is there any new information regarding its use? Can it do the job of a cant in order to angle the starter course? Is it a problem to install the slate over the SmartVent after removing it for the SmartVent installation? The historical commission will be glad it is practically an invisible application.
It looks like the way to go. I would appreciate info from anyone with an opinion on this matter.
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Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 165
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Monday, July 30, 2007 - 06:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Do these photos help? One shows the flashing at a slope change. It is folded to include a built-in cant.

The second shows a copper cleat used to hold the bottom edge of the flashing down. The cleat is nailed to the roof underneath the flashing.

The overlying slates will cover the entire upper half of the flashing, but the bottom half will remain exposed.

slope change

copper cleat
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Philip Gugliuzza
New member
Username: Phil

Post Number: 1
Registered: 07-2007
Posted on Monday, July 30, 2007 - 01:14 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

i'm working on a house that has 7/12 roof pitch from the fascia up 32" +/- and than jump to 10/12 front and back and 12/12 on the side. what is the best way to install the slate or flashing for the transition of the two pitch
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Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 152
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Monday, July 23, 2007 - 12:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The aluminum roof fan will not adversely affect the copper on the roof.
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Slate Affair Inc.
Senior Member
Username: Slate_man

Post Number: 112
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Wednesday, July 18, 2007 - 05:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Depending on what you want to pay for these vents. A custom copper shop can make them for you or a sheet metal company. I use Vulcan Supply in Vermont.
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Taras Zawarski
New member
Username: Twz

Post Number: 1
Registered: 07-2007
Posted on Wednesday, July 18, 2007 - 09:42 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

In a new home I am building, I need to install two power roof fans for ventilation of a hip roof. Does someone make copper power roof fans?
If not, will a painted aluminum roof fan (the standard kind) adversely react with the copper nails, flashing, drip edge and gutters?
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Jon Kranes
Posted on Wednesday, March 21, 2001 - 10:09 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

What is your opinion on ventilation of slate roofs? I have an 1890 house with slate roof and I want to insulate the attic. The insulation contractor insists I must add soffit and ridge vents before I insulate. My roofer (who does a lot of slate) said that slate "breathes" naturally and does not need any ventilation. Who do I believe?
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Wednesday, March 21, 2001 - 04:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Slate breathes. Roof ventilation became imperative when roofers switched to plywood sheathing and asphalt shingles, both of which do not breathe.

You can ventilate your roof via gable vents or aluminum roof vents (not ridge vents) if you really feel a need for it, but ridge vents are awkward on slate roofs for a number of reasons: they reduce access to the roof with hook ladders, and they make it hard to move around on the roof during maintenance or repair. People stress ventilation on roofs today primarily in order to save the plywood deck from delamination. Slate roofs should not have a plywood deck. They should have a wood board deck, which is a breathable deck.
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larry murray
Posted on Thursday, September 11, 2003 - 11:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

any suggestions on walking on slate roofs during installation?
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Anonymous
Posted on Friday, September 12, 2003 - 04:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If you are working off roof brackets and planks,We usually put a ladder from the lower set of brackets to the next set,as you move up the roof you can use a longer ladder to reach your 3rd or 4th set ect,,or you can install by working from the furring strips in conjunction with a ladder hook system.If using 1/4"slate try to stay off them as much as possible,saves on repairs when you remove brackets.Some times we will leave a slate out above the brackett strap(PUT A FILLER UNDER THE EMPTY SPOT TO KEEP FROM BREAKING THE SLATE)Replace missing slate when you tear down ect..Good luck,Walk lightly grasshopper..
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Saturday, September 13, 2003 - 12:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You don't need to walk on a slate roof during installation. Stay on your roof scaffold planks or on your hook ladders, or on the unslated sheathing.
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Anonymous
Posted on Thursday, September 18, 2003 - 09:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Right, You do not walk on the slate,what I meant was you do put foot pressure on the slate at times for balance,to reach for something ect,even then your toe and foot pressure should be light and it comes with years of working on slate.And still you may break a few.Hope this helps. Good Luck
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Friday, September 19, 2003 - 11:02 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yes, that's right.

Some guys walk on a slate roof like they're strolling down a sidewalk on a sunny day. In construction boots. Obviously, these are guys who will suddenly not exist when the roof needs repaired later. You *can* walk on a slate roof if you know what you're doing and are 100% responsible for repairing the roof if something breaks. It takes experience, soft shoes, and you have to be careful when doing it. In general, however, walking on a slate roof should be avoided, if at all possible.
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Dig814
Posted on Wednesday, February 25, 2004 - 01:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My questions is regarding ventilation as well. I have a 1922 Arts and Crafts house in Erie, Pa with original PA Gray slate that is in decent condition. My roofer figures it has probably 20 years of life left. Currently I am remodeling my attic and am concerned about ventilation. I put in gable vents and soffit vents. I also used baffles to allow air flow before I insulated. Since my house has no insulation to speak of other than what is going in the attic, I am concerned it will get to hot up there. I only have 2x6 rafters and I did fur them out about an inch, but still only could fit r-19 in. I have central air so I will be cooling up there in the summer. I left about a foot from the top of my ceiling to the peak so there was a cavity running the whole length from vent to vent. My question is, do you think it is neccesary to put in a gable fan to help promote circulation?
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Anonymous
Posted on Sunday, February 29, 2004 - 12:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Yes.
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Roofnron
Posted on Friday, March 12, 2004 - 10:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

This question is easy to answer "yes" to because of the ventilation hype. You have already installed intake ventilation "soffit vents" and exhaust ventilation " the gable end vents". Each vent has an amount of air movement it will allow to move in or out of the attic, described in squares inches Net Free Area. You NEVER want to have more exhaust ventilation than intake. This would create a negative pressure in the attic which will pull your conditioned air through cracks and crevices into the attic, or pull moisture into your attic from the other vents. I would recommend finding out your intake and exhaust amounts before troubling yourself with the fan. You will likely create a lot more exhaust than intake.

You have a slate roof though on an old house. Don't waste your time and money on the fan. Your attic is breathing well already.
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John Shepherd
Posted on Tuesday, August 03, 2004 - 04:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Jon: Regarding attic ventilation, if you are going to add attic ventilation I have three tips. 1) add the largest gable end vents you can safely install without creating a point of entry for moisture into the building. 2) stay away from ridge vents if possible. 3)Consider using low-profile type vents. An example that I am familiar with (I'm a consultant in CA) is the Award Metals Stealth Vent. I have used the version of this vent designed for tile (has a sub-flashing) and it does little to detract from the appearance of the roof. And they make it in copper upon request.
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Asa
Posted on Friday, April 08, 2005 - 09:11 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have another question regarding ventilation. I seem to get different answers depending on who I ask...some say slate roofs do not need to be vented, some say they do...what is right? I am finishing a currently unfinished attic. I will have low kneewalls and central heating/cooling via air. I have an original slate roof with no other underlayment then the original "planks". I understand that ridge vents are not recommended for slate roofs and I have a hard time using gable end vents since the gables are very elaborately decorated (it's an old Victorian) and they would look awful with gable vents. Will soffit vents alone help me? Or are they useless unless I combine them with gable end vents/ridge vents? Should I just leave things as they are? The area behind the kneewalls is really the only enclosed areas since I an keeping my crossties exposed.
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Spencer P.
Posted on Friday, April 08, 2005 - 12:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You certainly can install ridge vents on slate roofs, we perform this type of work quite often. Also it dosen't matter what type of roof you have you need proper ventalation. This helps in the whole process of proper insulation and ventalation. Years ago you might not have needed ventalation in slate roofs, they could vent themselves but, as we want to save $ on heating bills we insulate more and with more insulation you need more ventalation. Your slate roof might vent it self good right right now (due to the fact you have no underlayment, vents thru the slate) but when you insulate to close in your attic space you are not allowing the proper air flow to the under side of slate roof. You need (have to) install baffles before you install the insulation (between each rafter) then insulate. This keeps the insulation from getting pressed tight to the under side of roof thus, shutting off air flow. By doing this you need to put some type of vent (circle vents,etc..) at the eve or you will not get air flow to ridge. The eve vent acts like a intake and the ridge vent acts like an exhaust (to try to explain it simply) thus creating air flow. You want the under side of your roof to be as close to the tempature outside as it can be. Then you eliminate melting of snow and turning to ice at the eve. Venting also helps with condisation. You ever go by a home in the winter and see (if you live in a snow climate) snow on a perticular house roof while many others are melted off, this is no miracle they have proper insulation and ventalation, they've got it working, RIGHT. They are also saving $ on heating bills, if there is snow on the roof not much heat loss. But, a slate roof, on the sunny side of the roof will melt the snow off on a sunny day due to the slates heating up. Spencer P.
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Anonymous
Posted on Tuesday, August 16, 2005 - 11:56 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My roofing company recommended installing a power fan for ventilation on my slate roof due to evidence of condensation in the attic around the nails holding down the slates. We already had the attic insulated with cellulose. If they install a power fan, would the slate roof "breathe" enough to provide enough air intake? From what I am reading, we should install soffit intake vents, but our house doesn't have any soffits.
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Anonymous
Posted on Thursday, August 18, 2005 - 11:12 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I'm confused. There is still conflicting information about needing soffit/roof ventilation. Joe says no, others say yes. I need to insulate my rafters (including vapor barrier and baffles) due to excessive heat in the attic. Obviously, to minimize work, I'd like to avoid having to add soffit and roof vents. I understand the rationale that you create an air flow from the soffit vent to the roof vent but if there is already some breathing from the roof, couldn't that be enough and the extra venting is overkill?
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admin
Posted on Thursday, August 18, 2005 - 04:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You can try it without the soffit vents and see what happens. You can always add them later if you think you need them.
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Anonymous
Posted on Monday, August 22, 2005 - 07:45 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

you need soffit vents, period. if not the ventalation will not work, period. the soffit vents act (are) the intake and the ridge or roof vents are the exhaust. one will not work without the other, period. you say the attic is hot is that during the summer? the attic, if insulating the floor of attic should be the same temp. in as it is out side. if your insulating the ceiling (rafters) of the attic then you must want to use this attic space for a room (livable space) if not insulate floor of attic to keep the warm/cool air in the livable space. but you do need soffit vents either way, your baffles will carry the air from soffit (intake) vents to the roof (exhaust) vents.
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Monday, August 22, 2005 - 08:52 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

There are many houses with slate roofs, roof vents, and no soffit vents whatsoever. When the roof is constructed of boards and stone, air can infiltrate without soffit vents. When a roof is constructed of plywood, self-adhering membrane, and seal-tab asphalt shingles, there is no way for air to infiltrate the roof and soffit vents are necessary.
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Anonymous
Posted on Wednesday, August 24, 2005 - 12:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Interesting discussion. BTW, my attic is hot because of an airhandler in a new addition. It is blocked off but still creating some heat. I'll need to insulate the rafters as a result. Joe, with no soffit vents, how would one calculate the number and size of roof vents?
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admin
Posted on Wednesday, August 24, 2005 - 11:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It's hard to say without looking at the roof.
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Tom in Cincy
Posted on Friday, September 09, 2005 - 11:34 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have a finished (1899) attic with good plaster and no insulation. It was used as maids quarters, but now a teenager wants the space. We have solid T&G soffits ( no vents ). Since the walls and ceiling are intact I don't want to pull down to add fiberglass and drywall. What will happen if I blow cellulose into rafter cavities and fill them up? I can use a vapor barrier paint. Roof is Buckingham slate on planks. Thanks
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Chris Thomas
Posted on Sunday, October 30, 2005 - 10:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I feel like this question is redundant after reading the posts but I am looking for a little reasurance. I have a 1923 built slate roof on a solid brick house in Toledo OH. There is no insulation in any part of the home and I want to cut down my energy costs. I think what the messages are telling me is that I can insulate the attic floor and not worry about adding ANY ventilation because slate roofs breathe naturally. It sounds like moisture will not stay in the attic because the roof functions kinda like gore-tex. So therefore I should just figure out how much insulation I need and install it and move on with life.

Chris In TOledo
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Joe Jenkins (Admin)
Posted on Wednesday, November 02, 2005 - 02:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

If you insulate the attic floor, you should ventilate the roof space so it remains at outdoor air temperature. Otherwise, some warm air will infiltrate into the attic space and you may get water condensation on the underside of the roof sheathing. Of course, you can wait and see. If you are not getting condensation on the underside of the roof in the winter, then you're OK.
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Phil Canon
Posted on Monday, November 07, 2005 - 07:49 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

We have been plagued by ice falling from our slate roof and damaging our cars etc. We have a contractor who is going to put those mushroom shaped roof vents up there but when I look around, I don't see any other houses with this kind of roof with those. Are we making a mistake?
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Anonymous
Posted on Monday, November 07, 2005 - 09:51 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I don't believe that JUST roof vents will solve your problem. You should also add insulation and eve vents (you have to create an air flow for the roof vents to work). We install ice/snow bars (if you look at church's or commercial buildings with slate you will see these installed in areas of doors, sidewalks or driveways) in all areas where things can be damaged from falling ice/snow. We even install these in areas where you have roofs below so they will not be damaged. They work 100% GREAT if, installed correctly. They (the ice/snow bars) will solve your problem of protecting things below from the falling ice/snow. As far as why you get ice/snow build up and falling you need to address that as I mentioned above. Also remember this, a slate roof (no matter how good it is insulated and ventalated) will form a certain amount of ice/snow at eves. You see the slates heat up when the sun comes out (no matter how cold it is) and the snow melts goes to eve where the over hang is (remember the over hang is like a bridge stuff freezes there first.i.e you have cold air above and below (underside) of eve like a bridge thus the old term watch out for the bridges they freeze first applies to over hangs) and freezes as winter rolls along stuff keeps melting and freezing. This is mostly on the south sides of roofs but, with a slate roof you get a certain amount every where. Hope i've helped.
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Phil Canon
Posted on Monday, November 07, 2005 - 06:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The thing I was wondering was if it was bad for the integrity of the slate roof to cut into it to put these vents in. As I said I don't see anybody else doing it when I look at other slate roofs in the neighborhood.
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Joe Jenkins
Posted on Monday, November 07, 2005 - 11:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

we sell snow guards on this web site at http://www.slateroofcentral.com/store_snow_guards.html
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Anonymous
Posted on Tuesday, November 08, 2005 - 11:21 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

No it is not bad for the integrity of the slate or the slate roof for that matter to cutt and install "box" vents. What will be bad for your slate roof (leaking) and the integrity for your slate roof is these "box" vents being installed incorrectly by a non-slater, that would be bad. If you get a true slater you should be alright. Although I (our company) prefers ridge mounted vents (if they can be installed) they just seem to work better and they look like they belong (if done correctly) the "box" vents to me looks like an after thought. Take a look at the ridge section Joe offers it shows how to install ridge ventalation and maintain the slate look.
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Anonymous
Posted on Tuesday, November 08, 2005 - 11:23 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Oh yea, one more thing alot of slate roof have the "box" style vents--ALOT. So you won't be alone with this style of vents on your slate roof.
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joe
Posted on Friday, November 11, 2005 - 11:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

inexpensive ridge venting on saddle ridges can be seen at http://www.slateroofcentral.com/install_hips_ridges.htm
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Anonymous
Posted on Sunday, January 22, 2006 - 10:25 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have a 1850 one and half storey, Scotish fishermans cottage,uninsulated with slate roof, 100m from the sea.
It is solid boarded, it needs the slates re-fixing or re-newing (nails have gone due to the salt air). What is the best way to insulate at the same time as re-slating.
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admin
Posted on Monday, January 23, 2006 - 10:54 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

What is the roof frame like?
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Bill
Posted on Monday, January 23, 2006 - 04:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Good
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admin
Posted on Thursday, January 26, 2006 - 12:59 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I mean, what is the spacing between the rafters, or are there rafters, and if so, what size, or are there purlins with heavy rafters spaced widely apart, etc., etc.?
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Bill
Posted on Sunday, January 29, 2006 - 09:58 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

The rafters are 100mm x 50mm, space between the rafters is 400mm.
The roof is gable ended,11m long by 4m deep.The roof space is divided by two partition walls, no purlins.
The roof space bedrooms have just a plasterboard, the 100mm joist, then the 30mm sarking board, then slate.
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admin
Posted on Sunday, January 29, 2006 - 01:34 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Is there an interior space above the attic ceiling that can be used for air ventilation out the gable ends?
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Bill
Posted on Monday, January 30, 2006 - 02:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

There is a small air space above the attic ceiling, but it is not ventilated.
It is just a triangle 800mm wide by 450mm to the hip. At each gable end there is a chimney brest so it is not possible to vent.
The roof has never had any purpose made ventilation, just the gaps in the boarding and slates.
I am reluctant to insulate under the plaster board, because it will lower the bedroom ceiling by 50mm.
Is it possible to insulate between the sarking board and slate.
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Marcie Spechl
Posted on Sunday, March 05, 2006 - 12:15 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

My Mom died and left me what used to be a beautiful 100+ year old house with a steep slate roof & 4 dormers almost the size of the roof itself on each side. I think its called a manserd roof. My roofer says the slate has to come off because the copper nails have deteriorated. He wants to replace the slates with Carriage House shingles. Should I do this?
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Anonymous
Posted on Sunday, March 05, 2006 - 12:40 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Ventilation and Headlap questions:

Ventilation:
The slate is being installed on my new roof. Two gables of the roof are steep (17-12) and the connecting middle is at 10-12.
The architect specified 5/8 CDX Plywood as an underlayment which is installed.
The architect spec'd a ridge vent of Rollvent continuous ridge vent and four 1'x2'6" gable vents, and about 110lf of soffit vents. I have 135ft of ridge. The attic floor area is 3400 sf. The roofing contractor is uncomfortable with the ridge vent and says gravity will cause it to leak in 5 years.
Assuming I am stuck with the plywood underlayment, what is the best way to vent the roof?

Headlap:
On the 17-12 section, they are using a 2" headlap (18" tile, 8" chalk lines). Is this sufficient? As they haven't begun the 10-12 section, should I insist on a 3" headlap there?
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Slate Admirer
Posted on Sunday, March 05, 2006 - 10:45 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

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My roofer says the slate has to come off because the copper nails have deteriorated. He wants to replace the slates with Carriage House shingles. Should I do this?
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Marcie:

NO! Have a QUALIFIED SLATE ROOF contractor look at the roof before doing anything. Unless the slate itself is in bad condition, the roof is more than likely repairable. Slate roofs are like a jigsaw puzzle and can be taken apart, FIXED, and rebuilt again reusing the existing slate. The slate has been on the roof for 100 years already. The shingles that your roofer wants to put on to replace the 100 year old slate will only last 20 years and you'll be putting another roof on the house.
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slateworks
Posted on Sunday, March 05, 2006 - 07:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Marcie, In 20+ years of Slate roofing I have not seen copper nails deteriorate - old iron nails yes ,than can rust away and cause problems. You will have to have your Slate evaluated to see if they are worth saving or if they have reached the end of thier useful life -Slate roofs can range from 40 to 100's of years,just depends on the quality of the slate,enviromental factors and the pitch of the roof..Most of the time on a mansard style roof the top section or lower pitch will wear out first , the steep section will last much longer ,it is just a general rule of roofing that lower pitched roofs wear out faster than steeper roofs..All in all you need a second opinion and a more detailed explanation of why you should replace or maintain your existing slate roof.Good Luck. If your located around Pittsburgh,Pa area let me know and I will give you an honest appraisal.
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Bobby P
Posted on Sunday, March 19, 2006 - 03:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I have PA slate which is 65 years old. Roofer indicates its in good shape with about another 10 years of life, but have to replace about 65 slates this spring.
Is it possible to start mixing other, more longer lasting slate (Vermont or Virginia). The hope is that within 10 years I will have replaced the PA with the longer lasting slate without doing large overhaul at once.
I presume the big issues is thickness differential between the types.
Thanks
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Anonymous
Posted on Monday, March 20, 2006 - 08:58 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

It's possible but, I think the best way is to fix it with the thought in mind it 'all' needs to be replaced. Maybe replace a section at a time, we have done that alot on old slate roofs. Then in about 4-5yrs. you'll have a new roof. Without wasted $ on repairs. Start in the worse areas first. Usually this is the West or North sides. Good luck! You can find sources for recylced slates or new slates on this web site. You can also find contractors. Your on the right track with the thought of keeping your slate roof!
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John K
Posted on Monday, March 27, 2006 - 12:09 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I am interested in installing a whole house fan for a 100+ year old farmhouse in VT without any existing attic ventilation (other than the existing slate roof). Installing soffit vents would be pretty tricky because the soffit is at the same steep angle as the roof. I plan to install gable vents on both ends, but still come up short with the amount of open venting space needed for some of these fan units. Can I count the "breathable slate roof" for any credit towards venting? Or should I forget the whole house fan concept and just buy a gable end attic fan?

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