Cost of Slate Log Out | Topics | Search
Moderators | Register | Edit Profile

Slate Roof Central Message Board » Slate Roofs » Cost of Slate « Previous Next »

Author Message
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Paramount Slate
New member
Username: Paramount_slate

Post Number: 7
Registered: 07-2007
Posted on Friday, October 19, 2007 - 12:54 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Rosemary Ruggiero:
it is our pleasure to offer the top quality(ASTM S1) slate with a price lower than your current quote. We are strict on the craft to ensure the thickness and sizes. Please read our report.
application/pdfASTM S1-Dark Gray
Dark Gray ASTM S1.pdf (47.4 k)

application/pdfASTM S1 Gray Green
Gray Green ASTM S1.pdf (47.2 k)

application/pdfASTM S1 Midnight Black
Midnight Black ASTM S1.pdf (47.0 k)


Our data is far more stronger than American Slate who buy from our competition. To contact us, please call 703-597-6482 (Andy) or info@solarstoneintl.com
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Kurtis Hord
New member
Username: Kwhord

Post Number: 8
Registered: 10-2006
Posted on Friday, October 12, 2007 - 10:37 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Eric, I'm taking on a similar project. I do lots of architectural metalwork, but have little slate experience. A homeowner (and close friend) took a chance on me to repair a slate turret where I am also duplicating a finial in copper. I'm going to be posting pictures of my progress on the job. I think with a little research and some patience, you can handLE the gable roof, no problem. You could probably even do the valleys if you have any sheet metal experience.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Slate Affair Inc.
Senior Member
Username: Slate_man

Post Number: 132
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Friday, October 12, 2007 - 04:37 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I think you could do it yourself. You may fine you like the work. if you have the bible and some construction no-how you should do fine. If you get in to replacement of the metal flashing you may want to call some more roofers being that would be a little harder.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

M. Eric Sosa
New member
Username: Mesosa

Post Number: 1
Registered: 10-2007
Posted on Thursday, October 11, 2007 - 05:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

I need some thought from an expert. Last year I ended up with my wifes uncles 1900 era farm house. Total wreck. I have been involved with construction all my life and have shingled my fair share of conventional roofs. This house has a beautiful slate roof that for the most part is intact. The roof is a straight gable roof with another gable coming into it at a right angle. Most of the needed repair is along the gable edges with some work needed in the rear valley where a chimney once stood that has long been gone. I would guess the pitch at a 6 or 7 max. All but a few field tiles are in place. I have attempted to get a few slate guys out to look at it and give me a price but have been unsuccessful to date. Everyone else wants the roof removed and replaced. My question is this. Do you think it is possible for someone with my experience and your Slate Roof Bible to exact this type of repair? I would really like to save this roof
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Joe Jenkins
Senior Member
Username: Joe

Post Number: 178
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Wednesday, October 10, 2007 - 09:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

You are nearly correct. There are 170 slates in a square of 10x20 slates, which would have an exposure 10" wide and 8" high (with 3" headlap), or $2.35 per slate. The smaller the slate, the less they cost per piece (and the more slates needed per square).
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message

Rosemary Ruggiero
New member
Username: Rruggiero

Post Number: 1
Registered: 10-2007
Posted on Wednesday, October 10, 2007 - 10:07 am:   Edit Post Delete Post View Post/Check IP Print Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only) Ban Poster IP (Moderator/Admin only)

Can someone help me with the math. If a square is 10 feet by 10 feet, or 100 square feet, and the exposed portion of a piece of slate is 8 inches high by 10 inches wide, then there are 180 pieces of slate in a square. If a square costs $400, then one piece of slate costs $2.22. This seems rather inexpensive to me for such a durable product. Am I understanding this correctly?

Add Your Message Here
Post:
Username: Posting Information:
This is a private posting area. Only registered users and moderators may post messages here.
Password:
Options: Enable HTML code in message
Automatically activate URLs in message
Action:

Topics | Last Day | Last Week | Tree View | Search | User List | Help/Instructions | Program Credits Administration